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This is something I am not sure about in core data.

Suppose I have a loop like this:

for (int i=0; i<count; i++) {

  myManagedClass *myData = [NSEntityDescription insertNewObjectForEntityForName:@"myEntity"
 inManagedObjectContext:context];

  // adjust myData properties, something like
  // myData.name = [name objectAtIndex:i];
  // myData.address = [address objectAtIndex:i];
  // etc
}

Obviously this loop is not changing anything on the database unless I commit the changes. As I believe Core Data is intelligent, I suppose I have to put this

NSError *error = nil;
if (![contexto save:&error]) {
    // Handle the error.
}

outside the loop, right? I mean, all objects I create inside the loop are being added to the context and once the loop is finished I commit the changes, storing them on the database right?

Another questions:

  1. will this loop represent any load on the app in terms of database access (= disk access). I suppose no, but I prefer to hear your opinion.
  2. what kind of limit does this context has? How many objects can add to it before crashing or exhausting the memory? What's the best practice here?

thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Main question: Right.

Question 1 : No.

Question 2 : It depends on the size of your managed objects. The context itself has no restrictions in the size of the object graph other than the size of memory available for your application.

The first good practice is to exploit faults in the object graphs. For example, if you need a property of a managed object (in a fault) that is related to the object you already have in the context, fetch only the property, not the whole managed object. If you need a property of an object (in a fault) related to the object (also in a fault) that is related to the object you have in the context, use KVC to get the property only, leaving the two related objects in faults.

The second good practice is to send refreshObject:managedObject mergeChanges:NO messages to the context whenever appropriate. By setting the argument mergeChanged to NO, this message will simply fault the object and release the memory it used. In extreme cases you can send a reset message to fault all objects in the context.

Also, set the undo manager of the context to nil if you do not use the feature. Finally, consider using a custom autorelease pool when you are creating/fetching a lot of managed objects in a tight, heavy loop. For example,

NSAutoreleasePool *localPool = [[NSAutoreleasePool alloc] init];
for (int i=0; i<count; i++) {

    myManagedClass *myData = [NSEntityDescription 
            insertNewObjectForEntityForName:@"myEntity"
                     inManagedObjectContext:context];

    // adjust myData properties, something like
    // myData.name = [name objectAtIndex:i];
    // myData.address = [address objectAtIndex:i];
    // etc
}
[localPool release];

It depends on what you do in the loop whether having an autorelease pool is helpful/relevant.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks!!!! btw, do you know any tutorial on how to use the undo manager? thanks again! – SpaceDog Feb 17 '11 at 6:45

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