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I have a model class like this:

public class SomeClass
{
    public int EmployeeId {get;set;}
    public int DayTotal {get;set}
}

For this model class I am creating a custom ValidationAttribute for the 'DayTotal' property. The custom validator will check the entered value 'DayTotal' value against another table that defines the maximum days allowed.

How to I refer to the selected 'EmployeeId' from the Create view when writing my query in the validator?

public class DayTotalAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    ProjectDBContext db = new ProjectDBContext();

    public override bool IsValid(object value)
    {
        if (value == null)
        {
            return false;
        }

        var products = from p in db.EmployeeDayMax
                       where p.EmployeeId = ???
    }
}

UPDATE:

My solution has taken a different approach. The helpful answers got me looking in other places. This blog from Scott Gu helped to provide a simpler approach:

In my model ->

public class SomeClass : IValidateObject { public int EmployeeId {get; set;} public int DayTotal {get; set;}

     public IEnumerable<ValidationResult> Validate(ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        ProjectDBContext db = new ProjectDBContext();
        //check maxes...can refer directly to EmployeeId in LINQ queries
        if(failed)
        {
           yield return new ValidationResult("Days have been maxed!");
        }
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2 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

@Luke Bennett is completely right, ValidationContext is new in MVC 3.

Here's an example using your code:

public class DayTotalAttribute : ValidationAttribute
{
    ProjectDBContext db = new ProjectDBContext();

    protected override ValidationResult IsValid(object value, ValidationContext validationContext)
    {
        if (value != null)
        {
            var model = (SomeClass)validationContext.ObjectInstance;
            var products = from p in db.EmployeeDayMax
                       where p.EmployeeId = model.EmployeeId

            bool somethingIsWrong = // do your validation here

            if (somethingIsWrong)
            {
                return ValidationResult("Error Message");
            }
        }

        return base.IsValid(value, validationContext);
    }    
}
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I am getting close. The line 'var (model) = (SomeClass..' compiles fine but throws a 'InvalidCastException' when I actually run the program and enter some values in. Any ideas? –  John M Feb 16 '11 at 18:59
    
@John M: The Type of ObjectInstance should be the type of your ViewModel. So if you use ´SomeClass´ as the model of your view it should be fine. Can you see in the debugger what the actual type of ObjectInstance is? –  fretje Feb 16 '11 at 20:17
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In .NET 4.0 there is another overload for IsValid that takes a ValidationContext parameter. This has an ObjectInstance property which you can cast to SomeClass and gives you access to its other properties.

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