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Given this contrived example:

struct point_2d {
  point_2d& x( int n ) {
    x_ = n;
    return *this;
  }

  point_2d& y( int n ) {
    y_ = n;
    return *this;
  }

  int x_, y_;
};

struct point_3d : point_2d {
  point_3d& z( int n ) {
    z_ = n;
    return *this;
  }

  int z_;
};

int main() {
  point_3d p;
  p.x(0).y(0).z(0); // error: "point_2d" has no member named "z"
  return 0;
}

the idea is to use "member-function chaining" to be able to call more than one member-function in a row. (There are many examples of this; the above is the shortest one I could think of for the purpose of asking this question. My actual problem is similar and is described below.)

The problem is that if a derived class adds its own chaining member-functions but you call a base class's member function first, you get a base-class reference that of course won't work for calling a derived class's member-function.

Are there any clever ways to solve this problem and still maintain the ability to do member-function chaining?


The Actual Problem

My actual problem is that my base class is an exception and my derived class is a class derived from the base exception. For those classes also, I want to use member-function chaining:

class base_exception : public std::exception {
  // ...
  base_exception& set_something( int some_param ) {
    // ...
    return *this;
  }
};

class derived_exception : public base_exception {
  // ...
};

int main() {
  try {
    // ...
    if ( disaster )
      throw derived_exception( required_arg1, required_arg2 )
            .set_something( optional_param );
  }
  catch ( derived_exception const &e ) {
    // terminate called after throwing an instance of 'base_exception'
  }
}

The problem is that set_something() returns base_exception but the catch expects a derived_exception. Of course a human can tell that the actual type of the exception is a derived_exception but the compiler apparently can't tell.

That's the problem I'm really trying to solve, i.e., how to have a base exception class be able to set optional parameters on the exception object yet return an instance of the derived type. The point_2d example I gave above is (I believe) a smaller and simpler version of the same problem for people to understand and that a solution to the smaller problem will also solve my actual problem.

Note that I did consider making base_exception a template and pass in the derived type like:

template<class Derived>
class base_exception {
  // ...
  Derived& set_something( int some_param ) {
    // ...
    return *this;
  }
};

I believe that in fact does solve the problem, but it's not a perfect solution because if another class more_derived_exception derives from derived_exception, then we're back to the same problem.

share|improve this question
1  
The base_exception<class Derived> idea you have at the end of your question is known as the Curiously Recurring Template Pattern (CRTP). I don't think it'll provide a solution in your case because you won't be able to have single root base class for your exception hierarchy. –  Emile Cormier Feb 16 '11 at 17:43
    
@Emile: Yes, I said that it's not a perfect solution and why. –  Paul J. Lucas Feb 16 '11 at 17:54
    
I was merely pointing out, for the benefit of other readers, that the pattern you've shown had a particular name. I was also giving another reason why (different than yours) the solution would not work. It wasn't my intention to criticize you. :-) –  Emile Cormier Feb 16 '11 at 19:46
    
@Emile: the solution works in the case of an exception hierarchy if you derive 'base_exception' from the actual root of the hierarchy. (I had to replace 'return *this' by 'static_cast<Derived&>(*this)' though). It is however still not perfect for the reason given above by Paul. Cheers. –  Francois Apr 20 '11 at 13:34

3 Answers 3

What you're looking for is the Named Parameter Idiom, which I am copying from this StackOverflow answer. Rather than return a reference to the actual object, you return a reference to a special parameter object, and rely on a constructor for your exception object to do an implicit conversion once all the parameters are filled in. It's quite clever, really.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, seems like the best way to go. :) –  João Portela Feb 16 '11 at 19:04
    
+1 for linking to my answer –  Sam Miller Feb 16 '11 at 19:46
    
The linked-to example works only because the assignment of the parameter object to the actual object causes a conversion via constructor. In my case, there's no opportunity for any such conversion via the "throw" that will throw whatever you give it without conversion. –  Paul J. Lucas Feb 16 '11 at 21:28
    
Also, this solution suffers from the same problem in that if I have a DerivedParameter class to add new parameters but call a base Parameter member-function first, it will return a Parameter& and not a DeriverParameter&. We're back to where we started. –  Paul J. Lucas Feb 16 '11 at 21:36

Hi there I just had a similar Problem and here My Solution:

template<class DerivedOptions>
class SomeOptions
{
  private:
    DerivedOptions* derived;
    int param1_;
  public:
    SomeOptions()
    {
        derived = reinterpret_cast<DerivedOptions*>(this);
    }

    DerivedOptions & set_some_options(int param1)
    {
        param1_ = param1;
        return *derived;
    }
};

struct MoreOptions: public SomeOptions<MoreOptions>
{
  private:
    int more_;
  public:
    MoreOptions & set_more_options(int more)
    {
        more_ = more;
        return *this;
    }
};

Defininately contains some I know what I'm doing foo but on the other hand (at least in my application) the Base class is not meant to be used without inheritence.

Best regards, Regi

share|improve this answer
    
(1) You should use static_cast, not reinterpret_cast. (2) I don't think you need to store any pointer at all: you can simply cast *this in the return of set_some_options(). (3) This solution works only for one level of inheritance. –  Paul J. Lucas May 31 '11 at 18:21

Why don't you go for the simplest approach (maybe not the most elegant):

if ( disaster )
{
    derived_exception e = derived_exception( required_arg1, required_arg2 );
    e.set_something( optional_param );
    throw e;
}

Wouldn't that solve your problem or do I miss something?

share|improve this answer
    
he wants to be able to call e.set_something( optional_param ).set_another_something(). the set_another_something drived class method won't be able to be called if the set_something returns a pointer to the base class. –  cppanda Feb 16 '11 at 17:49
    
@cppanda OK, seems I partially misunderstood the question. –  sstn Feb 16 '11 at 17:58

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