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I trying to create an array of filename hashes (key) and filenames (value), but most functions I use don't seem to work like I want them to...

Why are these functions when used in a loop resulting in the same output string while the input string varies? md5 and sha1 don't have this problem, but aren't reversible and that's needed.

foreach ($files as $file)
{
  debug(array(bin2hex($file), $file));
}

// result
app/views/helpers/monolith.php (line 45)

Array
(
    [0] => 2f686f6d652f6d746572736d697474656e2f7075626c69635f68746d6c2f6170702f707269766174652f6d622f323031302f31322e706466
    [1] => /home/mtersmitten/public_html/app/private/mb/2010/12.pdf
)


app/views/helpers/monolith.php (line 45)

Array
(
    [0] => 2f686f6d652f6d746572736d697474656e2f7075626c69635f68746d6c2f6170702f707269766174652f6d622f323031302f31312e706466
    [1] => /home/mtersmitten/public_html/app/private/mb/2010/11.pdf
)


app/views/helpers/monolith.php (line 45)

Array
(
    [0] => 2f686f6d652f6d746572736d697474656e2f7075626c69635f68746d6c2f6170702f707269766174652f6d622f323031302f31302e706466
    [1] => /home/mtersmitten/public_html/app/private/mb/2010/10.pdf
)

I hope this example is more clear...

share|improve this question
    
I can't speak to bin2hex() - maybe it just uses part of the input string or chokes on dots or something - but base64_encode() should work fine. –  Pekka 웃 Feb 16 '11 at 17:40
3  
You should look again. The keys are indeed different. 3132 is the hex-encoding for 12.pdf and 3131 for 11.pdf. Maybe you should explain your use case. As the keys you are using now are just obfuscated filenames. –  mario Feb 16 '11 at 17:42
    
I posted a better (simple) example... –  tersmitten Feb 16 '11 at 18:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

In fact the strings are different. You should check more carefully. They are the same for the most part, because both bin2hex and base64_encode encode the sequence of bytes and do not generate a hash like sha1 or md5.

bin2hex just converts every character in the string to its hex value and as for base64, check the wikipedia article to see exactly why the string is the same for large part of the outcome

share|improve this answer
 ... f6d622f323031302f31322e706466
                         ^
                       1 2 . p h p
 ... f6d622f323031302f31312e706466
                         ^
                       1 1 . p h p
 ... f6d622f323031302f31302e706466
                         ^
                       1 0 . p h p

Your "hashes" are different at the spot I've indicated. bin2hex isn't encryption or hashing, it simply takes each character of the input string and converts it into the string version of its hexadecimal ascii code.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 nice one.... –  enam Feb 16 '11 at 18:43
    
Thanks a million! Do you think bin2hex is suited for passing file names to an url? –  tersmitten Feb 16 '11 at 19:01
1  
No. bin2hex has a best & worst-case size increase of 2x - it ALWAYS doubles the length of a string. why not just use urlencode()? Best case is no change in length, worst case is double, average case is only a few bytes more. –  Marc B Feb 16 '11 at 19:05
    
urlencoded strings can't be array keys, can they? –  tersmitten Feb 16 '11 at 19:12
1  
Any string can be an array key, including an empty string. –  Marc B Feb 16 '11 at 19:15

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