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I have an xml like this:

<todo>
    <doLaundry cost="1"/>
    <washCar cost="10"/>
    <tidyBedroom cost="0" experiencePoints="5000"/>
</todo>

And the XSD schema for it is:

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <xs:complexType name="todo">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:choice maxOccurs="unbounded">
                <xs:element name="doLaundry" type="doLaundry" />
                <xs:element name="washCar" type="washCar" />
                <xs:element name="tidyBedroom" type="tidyBedroom" />
            </xs:choice>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="doLaundry">
        <xs:attribute name="cost" type="xs:int" />
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="washCar">
        <xs:attribute name="cost" type="xs:int" />
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="tidyBedroom">
        <xs:attribute name="cost" type="xs:int" />
        <xs:attribute name="experiencePoints" type="xs:int" />
    </xs:complexType>
</xs:schema>

And when I process this schema through JAXB I get a class with a method like this:

public class Todo {

    public List<Object> getDoLaundryOrWashCarOrTidyBedroom() {
        ...
    }

}

Ideally, what I would like is a way to define a generic base type that all the other XSD types extend. The Jaxb classes generated from the XSD schema should have a method to return a list of generic tasks. This would make it very easy to add new tasks to the todo list:

public class Todo {

    public List<Task> getTasks() {
        ...
    }

}

public abstract class Task {
    public int getCost() {
        ...
    }
}

public class TidyBedroom extends Task {
    public int getExperiencePoints() {
        ...
    }
}

What should the XSD schema look like in order to generate the above Java classes?

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4 Answers

up vote 12 down vote accepted

I found the answer with the help of Blaise Doughan's article here: http://bdoughan.blogspot.com/2010/11/jaxb-and-inheritance-using-xsitype.html

This schema:

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <xs:complexType name="todo">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:choice maxOccurs="unbounded">
                <xs:element name="doLaundry" type="doLaundry" />
                <xs:element name="washCar" type="washCar" />
                <xs:element name="tidyBedroom" type="tidyBedroom" />
            </xs:choice>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType abstract="true" name="Task">
        <xs:attribute name="cost" type="xs:int" use="required" />
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="doLaundry">
        <xs:complexContent>
            <xs:extension base="Task">
            </xs:extension>
        </xs:complexContent>
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="washCar">
        <xs:complexContent>
            <xs:extension base="Task">
            </xs:extension>
        </xs:complexContent>
    </xs:complexType>

    <xs:complexType name="tidyBedroom">
        <xs:complexContent>
            <xs:extension base="Task">
                <xs:attribute name="experiencePoints" type="xs:int" />
            </xs:extension>
        </xs:complexContent>
    </xs:complexType>

</xs:schema>

combined with a binding file:

<jxb:bindings version="1.0" xmlns:jxb="http://java.sun.com/xml/ns/jaxb" xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <jxb:bindings>
      <jxb:bindings schemaLocation="todo.xsd" node="/xs:schema/xs:complexType[@name='todo']/xs:sequence/xs:choice">
            <jxb:property name="Tasks"/>
        </jxb:bindings>
    </jxb:bindings>
</jxb:bindings>

Will give abstract and inherited classes as I described in the question. The binding file will change Jaxb's default method name from getDoLaundryOrWashCarOrTidyBedroom() to getTasks().

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xsd:choice corresponds to the @XmlElements annotation. You could apply this annotation directly to your desired object model.

For more information see:

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I think I didn't make my question clear enough intially. I am starting with an XSD schema and want to generate the Java classes from that with JAXB. I'd like to know if it is possible to structure the XSD in such a way as to give the desired Java object model - not the other way round. –  Alex Spurling Feb 17 '11 at 11:16
    
You could define an inheritance relationship between the types in your XML schema. Check out this post for an example: bdoughan.blogspot.com/2010/11/… –  Blaise Doughan Feb 17 '11 at 11:30
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Use xs:extension in your schema and your JAXB classes will be inherited (extended) as you define in your schema.

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Maybe I'm not 'getting' the question, but what is wrong with..

<xs:schema xmlns:xs="http://www.w3.org/2001/XMLSchema">
    <xs:complexType name="todo">
        <xs:sequence>
            <xs:choice maxOccurs="unbounded">
                <xs:element name="doLaundry" type="task" />
                <xs:element name="washCar" type="task" />
                <xs:element name="tidyBedroom" type="task" />
            </xs:choice>
        </xs:sequence>
    </xs:complexType>


    <xs:complexType name="task">
        <xs:attribute name="cost" type="xs:int" />
        <xs:attribute name="experiencePoints" type="xs:int" />
    </xs:complexType>
</xs:schema>
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1  
Given this schema, Jaxb will not generate the class hierarchy I showed in the question. It will create a single class 'Task' and after unmarshalling the xml, there would be no way to distinguish one instance of Task from another. For example, apart from their cost, there would be no difference between the doLaundry and washCar Task objects. –  Alex Spurling Feb 19 '11 at 16:39
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