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I'm working on Generator of cellular automata in .NET 3.5. I decided to use WPF because I wanted to learn something new in WPF.

I draw OneDimensional automata like Rule 30 and TwoDimensional like Life.

I need something to draw many images quick.

For example, dimensions of mesh is 64 x 64 and size of cell is 12px. So I draw 64*64 = 4096 images in one step. And interval between one step is about 100 ms.

I rewrite my application to the WinForms and there is everything ok. But in WPF is slow and I don't know why.


My example of drawing in WPF:

I have a class derived from Image. In this class I draw a bitmap and I use it in Source property.

        public void DrawAll()
    {

        DrawingGroup dg = new DrawingGroup();


        for (byte i = 0; i < this.DimensionX; ++i)
        {

            for (byte j = 0; j < this.DimensionY; ++j)
            {

                Piece p = this.Mesh[i][j];

                Rect rect = new Rect(j * this.CellSize + (j + 1), i * this.CellSize + (i + 1),
                    this.CellSize, this.CellSize);

                ImageDrawing id = new ImageDrawing();
                id.Rect = rect;

                if (p == null)
                    id.ImageSource = this._undefinedPiece.Image.Source;
                else
                    id.ImageSource = p.Image.Source;


                dg.Children.Add(id);


            }

        }

        DrawingImage di = new DrawingImage(dg);

        this.Source = di;

    }

Second example of drawing in WPF:

I have derived class from Canvas and override OnRender function. Based on this article: http://sachabarber.net/?p=675

protected override void OnRender(DrawingContext dc)
    {
        base.OnRender(dc);

        for (byte i = 0; i < this.DimensionX; ++i)
        {

            for (byte j = 0; j < this.DimensionY; ++j)
            {


                Rect rect = new Rect(j * this.CellSize + (j + 1), i * this.CellSize + (i + 1),
                    this.CellSize, this.CellSize);



                BitmapImage bi;

                int counter = i + j + DateTime.Now.Millisecond;

                if (counter % 3 == 0)
                    bi = this.bundefined;
                else if (counter % 3 == 1)
                    bi = this.bwhite;
                else
                    bi = this.bred;


                dc.DrawImage(bi, rect);

                ++counter;

            }

        }
    }

Thanks for all replies

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2 Answers 2

As written in this article, the fastest way to draw 2D in wpf is the StreamGeomerty. I'm sure you're able to accomodate your pattern generation logic to the needs of this class.

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Actually, the linked article at the end resorts to using an InteropBitmap. –  Jens Feb 17 '11 at 16:22
    
I think that performances achieved prior to use unsafe code is already suitable for most needs. –  BertuPG Feb 17 '11 at 16:47
    
An alternative without resorting on unsafe code can be the use of WriteableBitmap, that of course will be a little slower than InteropBitmap. –  BertuPG Feb 17 '11 at 16:58
    
I was looking at WriteableBitmap and StreamGeometry, but there is the possibility of painting images from Image or ImageSource? I didn't find anything like DrawImage etc. –  austinem Feb 17 '11 at 18:28
    
Geometries are for drawing paths. If all you need are rectangles, it would be sufficient. If you need images - I never tried it - but I think you can use a ImageBrush to paint filled areas, using AlignementX, AlignementY and ViewPort properties to make tiles aligned with your rectangles. –  BertuPG Feb 18 '11 at 8:28

WPF real power is in rendering vector. Is there a way that instead of using Image, you can create rectangle objects of a predetermined size assign color and then assign location? Bitmap is pretty resource intensive to work with vs vector. Even though WPF pushes the rendering off to the video card, it is still a lot of processing.

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