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I have the following table structure:

table Parent (Id)

table Child (ParentId, SortOrder, Id, Data)

Normal data should look like this in the Child table:

ParentId    SortOrder   Id     Data
--------    ---------   ----   ----
   1            0        100   'Samuel'
   1            1        101   'Levi'
   1            2        102   'Isaac'
   2            0        103   'Emma'
   3            0        104   'Maddison'

Unfortunately, something has become corrupted to make the data look like this:

ParentId    SortOrder   Id     Data
--------    ---------   ----   ----
   1            2        100   'Samuel'
   1            4        101   'Levi'
   1            5        102   'Isaac'
   2            3        103   'Emma'
   3            0        104   'Maddison'

How can I identify, through SQL, parents with children that are not properly ordered through my zero-based SortOrder column?

In the above example, the SQL query would tell me that ParentId 1 and 2 are invalid.

share|improve this question
    
Do you have a "correct" data source that you can compare against? –  Abe Miessler Feb 16 '11 at 19:26
    
sql server version 2005+? –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 16 '11 at 19:28
    
i'd bet this got "corrupted" by deleting some entries from table –  Imre L Feb 16 '11 at 19:37
    
@Abe: no I don't; both production & test have the same data –  Michael Hedgpeth Feb 16 '11 at 19:53
    
@Richard: SQL Server 2008 –  Michael Hedgpeth Feb 16 '11 at 19:53

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can compare the generated Row_number against the recorded sortorder

select distinct ParentId
from 
(
select *, rn=ROW_NUMBER() over (partition by parentid order by sortorder) -1
from Child
) X
where rn <> Sortorder
share|improve this answer
    
change distinct ParentId to * to see all mismatches –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 16 '11 at 19:37
    
Great solution; worked like a charm! Thanks so much. –  Michael Hedgpeth Feb 16 '11 at 20:23

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