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I am writing a function, which I want to return "const std::string&". Let's just look at the codes.

class A
{
public:
    const std::string& GetString() const
    {
        if (list.empty())
        {
            return "Warning!";    // how to get around this line.
        }
        return list[0];
    };
protected:
    std::vector<std::string> list;
};

The above codes are an example. The basic idea is to write a function that returns const reference, but also able to check for errors.

So, how to get around "return "Warning!";"?

Thanks,

share|improve this question
    
That's nice to know. So what's the question? –  Mehrdad Feb 16 '11 at 19:28
    
You could throw an exception. –  birryree Feb 16 '11 at 19:29
    
Maybe I can just return "std::string" instead, but any other thoughts? –  Snowfish Feb 16 '11 at 19:29
2  
@Snowfish under normal circumstances returning a std::string by value is not too expensive - it uses implicit sharing, so what is really copied is a lightweight wrapper, not the data itself. So yes, thats also a good possibility. –  Fiktik Feb 16 '11 at 19:41
3  
If you return by value, most compilers nowadays do something called "return value optimization". They won't construct a temporary object just to copy it into the final place, they will construct the result straight were it should go - hope that was understandable. –  sstn Feb 16 '11 at 19:51

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted
if (list.empty()) {
    static std::string w("Warning!");
    return w;
}

since you're returning a const reference, it does not matter that you're always returning a reference to the same object.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 this is cleaner that my solution :) –  Fiktik Feb 16 '11 at 19:43
    
+1 better than mine too. except i'd still prefer to use error flags because they're faster to test. –  wilhelmtell Feb 16 '11 at 19:45
    
I would have preferred to use an empty string in this case because it is so much cleaner and faster to test for, but I was trying to stick to the original behavior. Also, I don't know if an empty string is already a valid return. –  Ferruccio Feb 16 '11 at 20:44

If you're interested in using string references, why not take a string reference as a parameter and return a Boolean success/failure flag?

class A
{
public:
    const bool GetString(std::string& outString) const
    {
        if (list.empty())
            return false;

        outString = list[0];
        return true;
    };
protected:
    std::vector<std::string> list;
};

Achieves same result, and gives a simple Boolean result.

EDIT: as Ferruccio points out, this isn't an approach to be taken lightly. Use of parameters for output in this manner is prone to causing confusion and bugs, and should be used sparingly, and be well documented where used.

share|improve this answer
    
This will certainly work (+1), but in general it's not a good idea to return values through the argument list. –  Ferruccio Feb 16 '11 at 21:31
    
@Ferrucio: agreed. I'd certainly try to avoid this thing as much as possible, but like all such potentially dodgy practices it does have its uses if all other avenues don't work out. –  Mac Feb 16 '11 at 21:39

If you really want to avoid using exceptions (that would be my first choice), you may consider this:

class A
{
public:
    const std::string& GetString() const
    {
        if (list.empty())
        {
            return warning;
        }
        return list[0];
    };
protected:
    std::vector<std::string> list;

private:
    static std::string warning;
};

// in *.cpp
std::string A::warning = "warning";
share|improve this answer

You might throw an exception in this function and add a function to check whether the list is empty. Then the caller can check before calling GetString(). But if they fail to do that, they get an exception they can't ignore.

share|improve this answer

If you don't want to use exceptions (there are pros and cons of going either way), I'd first ask if it's reasonable to require the caller to call an "isValid" method first.

class A
{
public:
    bool IsStringValid() const
    {
         return !list.empty();
    }
    const std::string& GetString() const
    {
        if (list.empty())
        {
            return "";
        }
        return list[0];
    };
protected:
    std::vector<std::string> list;

private:
    static QString warning;
};

If it were me, I'd probably have it return a const std::string* instead so NULL is an option, or define a sentinel value as Fiktik suggested.

share|improve this answer
1  
So, the usual question: Who owns a std::string* and who is going to delete it? –  sstn Feb 16 '11 at 19:53
    
If you return a const std::string*, you're pretty much declaring ownership (or at least telling the caller that they aren't responsible). Compiler won't let you delete a const pointer. Why the vote down? –  Simeon Fitch Feb 17 '11 at 19:08

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