Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Assuming n testers were testing the same application for a given period. Each tester found a given set of bugs (Some of the bugs were detected by more than one tester).

For example:

Tester 1 found bugs {1,2,3,4,5} Tester 2 found bugs {3,5,6,7} Tester 3 found bugs {1,3,5,8,9,10}

Assuming all bugs have equal probability to be detected, can I estimate how many undetected bugs are there is my application?

Edit

Even more challenging: How can I calculate the probability of having x undetected bugs?

share|improve this question
    
Interesting question. I don't think you've specified enough parameters to provide a solution. Consider number of runs and test coverage. –  Paul Nathan Feb 16 '11 at 19:43
    
@Paul Nathan: That's all my input. The three testers were testing the same app for about 40 hours each, without any methodology or guidance. –  Lior Kogan Feb 16 '11 at 19:47
    
"Assuming all bugs have equal probability to be detected" - is this just a theoretical question, or are you planning to rely on the answer you come up with? This seems a pretty dangerous assumption, if you're planning to put a lot of weight on the resulting metric. –  testerab Feb 16 '11 at 21:01

3 Answers 3

Here is a blog post I wrote on this problem: How many errors are left to find?

Of course no model can tell you precisely, but this is better than a finger in the wind.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! Can the suggested formula be extended to more than two testers? –  Lior Kogan Feb 16 '11 at 19:52
    
One possibility would be to apply the Lincoln index idea to each pair of testers. You'll get different estimates based on each pair, and that's good! If they approximately agree, maybe you have a good estimate. And if they're very different, that tells you the estimate isn't very reliable, possibly because its assumptions don't hold. –  John D. Cook Feb 17 '11 at 1:38

Assuming all bugs have equal probability to be detected, can I estimate how many undetected bugs are there in my application?

Your assumption is not true, but, to answer your question.

For example:

Tester 1 found bugs {1,2,3,4,5} Tester 2 found bugs {3,5,6,7} Tester 3 found bugs {1,3,5,8,9,10}

You have 10 known bugs.

Tester 1 found 50% of the bugs, Tester 2 found 40% of the bugs, and Tester 3 found 60% of the bugs.

Multiplying the 3 numbers together (.50 x .40 x .60), yields .12

You can estimate that you've found 12% of the bugs, or that there are 85 more bugs to find.

So, why such a low number?

We're calculating the probable number of bugs remaining.

Let's take another example. Suppose your 3 testers found the same 6 bugs. The probability would be high that they found all the bugs.

And that's what multiplying does. Multiplying 1 x 1 x 1 yields 1.

Let's take a much worse example. Suppose your 3 testers found 6 unique bugs each. We have to assume that there are many more bugs out there, since no one found the same bug.

And that's what multiplying does. Multiplying .33 x .33 x .33 yields .04 or 4% of the bugs found.

I know that seems like a low number. But 4% is a conservative estimate when 3 people find 6 unique bugs each.

share|improve this answer
    
Why is it so ?? –  Lior Kogan Feb 16 '11 at 20:12
    
I'll answer your question in my answer. –  Gilbert Le Blanc Feb 16 '11 at 20:21

Appoint a Project Saboteur, see http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?ProjectSaboteur for details. The basic idea is that you deliberately inject N random bugs, then go through a test cycle. Your testing will detect some fraction of those N, and by dividing the number of known bugs by that fraction, you can estimate the total number of bugs. There are lots of gotchas to the method, of course.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.