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When working with variables/parameters that can only take a finite number of values, I try to always use Java's enum, as in

public enum BonusType {
  MONTHLY, YEARLY, ONE_OFF
}

As long as I stay inside my code, that works fine. However, I often need to interface with other code that uses plain int (or String) values for the same purpose, or I need to read/write from/to a database where the data is stored as a number or string.

In that case, I'd like to have a convenient way to associate each enum value with a an integer, such that I can convert both ways (in other words, I need a "reversible enum").

Going from enum to int is easy:

public enum BonusType {
  public final int id;

  BonusType(int id) {
    this.id = id;
  }
  MONTHLY(1), YEARLY(2), ONE_OFF(3);
}

Then I can access the int value as BonusType x = MONTHLY; int id = x.id;.

However, I can see no nice way for the reverse, i.e. going from int to enum. Ideally, something like

BonusType bt = BonusType.getById(2); 

The only solutions I could come up with are:

  • Put a lookup method into the enum, which uses BonusType.values() to fill a map "int -> enum", then caches that and uses it for lookups. Would work, but I'd have to copy this method identically into each enum I use :-(.
  • Put the lookup method into a static utility class. Then I'd only need one "lookup" method, but I'd have to fiddle with reflection to get it to work for an arbitrary enum.

Both methods seem terribly awkward for such a simple (?) problem.

Any other ideas/insights?

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I <3 java enums but hate them for this reason exactly! It always seems like they're perfect aside from one really ugly flaw... –  Chris Thompson Feb 16 '11 at 19:46
6  
for enum->int you can just use ordinal() –  davin Feb 16 '11 at 19:48
1  
Are your id-values decidable by you (meaning, couldn't you just use .ordinal()), or are they decided by outside forces? –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 16 '11 at 19:57
2  
@davin: Yes, and have your code break the moment someone rearranges the enum declaration, or deletes a value in the middle. I'm afraid that's not a robust solution :-/. –  sleske Feb 16 '11 at 19:58
    
@davin using "ordinal()" should be avoided whenever possible, it's in the language's specification –  Jubbat May 16 '13 at 12:12
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11 Answers

up vote 21 down vote accepted

http://www.javaspecialists.co.za/archive/Issue113.html

The solution starts out similar to yours with an int value as part of the enum definition. He then goes on to create a generics-based lookup utility:

public class ReverseEnumMap<V extends Enum<V> & EnumConverter> {
    private Map<Byte, V> map = new HashMap<Byte, V>();
    public ReverseEnumMap(Class<V> valueType) {
        for (V v : valueType.getEnumConstants()) {
            map.put(v.convert(), v);
        }
    }

    public V get(byte num) {
        return map.get(num);
    }
}

This solution is nice and doesn't require 'fiddling with reflection' because it's based on the fact that all enum types implicitly inherit the Enum interface.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't this use the ordinal? Sleske uses an id just because the ordinal changes when the enum values get reordered. –  extraneon Feb 16 '11 at 19:52
    
No, it doesn't use ordinal. It relies on an explicitly defined int value. That int value is used as the map key (returned by v.convert()). –  Jeff Feb 16 '11 at 19:57
2  
I really like this solution; it seems this is the most general you can get. –  sleske Feb 17 '11 at 14:05
    
+1. My only note is that I'd use Number instead of Byte, because my backing value might be larger in size. –  Ivaylo Slavov Jan 4 '13 at 10:56
1  
Really and truly read the question. If you're dealing with a legacy database or external system that has defined integers that you don't want to propagate through your own code, then this is exactly one of those cases. The ordinal is an extremely fragile way to persist the value of an enum, and beyond that it is useless in the specific case mentioned in the question. –  Jeff Mar 19 at 16:06
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enum → int

yourEnum.ordinal()

int → enum

EnumType.values()[someInt]

String → enum

EnumType.valueOf(yourString)

enum → String

yourEnum.name()

A side-note:
As you correctly point out, the ordinal() may be "unstable" from version to version. This is the exact reason why I always store constants as strings in my databases. (Actually, when using MySql, I store them as MySql enums!)

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2  
+1 This is the obvious correct answer. Note though, there is a single argument method for valueOf which takes only a String and exists as long as you are using the concrete enum type (e.g. BonusType.valueOf("MONTHLY")) –  Tim Bender Feb 16 '11 at 19:57
5  
Using ordinal() strikes me as a problematic solution, because it will break when the list of enum values is rearranged, or a value is deleted. Also, this is only practical if the int values are 0...n (which I have often found not to be the case). –  sleske Feb 16 '11 at 20:00
3  
@sleske, if you start deleting constants you're in trouble with existing persisted data anyway. (Updated my answer in this regard.) –  aioobe Feb 16 '11 at 20:01
2  
Using the values() array will only work if all your values are 0 indexed for their id and are declared in order. (I tested this to verify that if you declare FOO(0), BAR(2), BAZ(1); that values[1] == BAR and values[2] == BAZ despite the ids passed in .) –  corsiKa Feb 16 '11 at 20:14
2  
@glowcoder, well of-course, the integer argument is merely a field in the enum-object. It has nothing to do with the ordinal constant associated with the enum object (it could just as well have been a double). –  aioobe Feb 16 '11 at 20:16
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I found this on the web, it was very helpful and simple to implement. This solution was NOT made by me

http://www.ajaxonomy.com/2007/java/making-the-most-of-java-50-enum-tricks

public enum Status {
 WAITING(0),
 READY(1),
 SKIPPED(-1),
 COMPLETED(5);

 private static final Map<Integer,Status> lookup 
      = new HashMap<Integer,Status>();

 static {
      for(Status s : EnumSet.allOf(Status.class))
           lookup.put(s.getCode(), s);
 }

 private int code;

 private Status(int code) {
      this.code = code;
 }

 public int getCode() { return code; }

 public static Status get(int code) { 
      return lookup.get(code); 
 }

}

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You could perhaps use something like

Interface EnumWithId {
    public int getId();

}


enum Foo implements EnumWithId {

   ...
}

That would reduce the need for reflection in your utility class.

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I'm not sure if it's the same in Java, but enum types in C are automatically mapped to integers as well so you can use either the type or integer to access it. Have you tried simply accessing it with integer yet?

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2  
Enums in Java don't behave that way. They're an explicit type. –  Chris Thompson Feb 16 '11 at 19:39
    
Each enum object would have a internal number (namely the position in which it was declared), and it can be accessed by the .ordinal() method. (The other way, use BonusType.values()[i].) But in the example cited above, the indexes here and the outside values don't coincide. –  Paŭlo Ebermann Feb 16 '11 at 19:55
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Use an interface to show it who's boss.

public interface SleskeEnum {
    int id();

    SleskeEnum[] getValues();

}

public enum BonusType implements SleskeEnum {


  MONTHLY(1), YEARLY(2), ONE_OFF(3);

  public final int id;

  BonusType(int id) {
    this.id = id;
  }

  public SleskeEnum[] getValues() {
    return values();
  }

  public int id() { return id; }


}

public class Utils {

  public static SleskeEnum getById(SleskeEnum type, int id) {
      for(SleskeEnum t : type.getValues())
          if(t.id() == id) return t;
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("BonusType does not accept id " + id);
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {

      BonusType shouldBeMonthly = (BonusType)getById(BonusType.MONTHLY,1);
      System.out.println(shouldBeMonthly == BonusType.MONTHLY);

      BonusType shouldBeMonthly2 = (BonusType)getById(BonusType.MONTHLY,1);
      System.out.println(shouldBeMonthly2 == BonusType.YEARLY);

      BonusType shouldBeYearly = (BonusType)getById(BonusType.MONTHLY,2);
      System.out.println(shouldBeYearly  == BonusType.YEARLY);

      BonusType shouldBeOneOff = (BonusType)getById(BonusType.MONTHLY,3);
      System.out.println(shouldBeOneOff == BonusType.ONE_OFF);

      BonusType shouldException = (BonusType)getById(BonusType.MONTHLY,4);
  }
}

And the result:

C:\Documents and Settings\user\My Documents>java Utils
true
false
true
true
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.IllegalArgumentException: BonusType does not accept id 4
        at Utils.getById(Utils.java:6)
        at Utils.main(Utils.java:23)

C:\Documents and Settings\user\My Documents>
share|improve this answer
1  
Just like with Turd Ferguson's answer, that's the unelegant solution I'd like to avoid / improve... –  sleske Feb 16 '11 at 19:47
    
I usually create the reverse mappings in a static{ } block to not have to loop over values() every time I ask for a value by id. I also usually call the method valueOf(int) to make it appear somewhat like the valueOf(String) method already there for Strings (also part of the OP's question). Somewhat like item 33 in Effective Java: tinyurl.com/4ffvc38 –  Fredrik Feb 16 '11 at 19:51
    
@Sleske Updated with a more refined solution. @Fredrik interesting, although I doubt the iteration is going to be a significant issue. –  corsiKa Feb 16 '11 at 20:09
    
@glowcoder Well, not having to iterate more than once means that it doesn't matter if you do it a thousand times per second where it can be a very significant issue or just call it twice. –  Fredrik Feb 16 '11 at 20:30
    
@Fredrik I'll admit there are times where it may be necessary to optimize. I'm also saying that until it's an identified performance issue, don't optimize for it. –  corsiKa Feb 16 '11 at 21:01
show 2 more comments

Really great question :-) I used solution similar to Mr.Ferguson`s sometime ago. Our decompiled enum looks like this:

final class BonusType extends Enum
{

    private BonusType(String s, int i, int id)
    {
        super(s, i);
        this.id = id;
    }

    public static BonusType[] values()
    {
        BonusType abonustype[];
        int i;
        BonusType abonustype1[];
        System.arraycopy(abonustype = ENUM$VALUES, 0, abonustype1 = new BonusType[i = abonustype.length], 0, i);
        return abonustype1;
    }

    public static BonusType valueOf(String s)
    {
        return (BonusType)Enum.valueOf(BonusType, s);
    }

    public static final BonusType MONTHLY;
    public static final BonusType YEARLY;
    public static final BonusType ONE_OFF;
    public final int id;
    private static final BonusType ENUM$VALUES[];

    static 
    {
        MONTHLY = new BonusType("MONTHLY", 0, 1);
        YEARLY = new BonusType("YEARLY", 1, 2);
        ONE_OFF = new BonusType("ONE_OFF", 2, 3);
        ENUM$VALUES = (new BonusType[] {
            MONTHLY, YEARLY, ONE_OFF
        });
    }
}

Seeing this is apparent why ordinal() is unstable. It is the i in super(s, i);. I'm also pessimistic that you can think of a more elegant solution than these you already enumerated. After all enums are classes as any final classes.

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For the sake of completeness, here is a generic approach to retrieve enum values by index from any enum type. My intention was to make the method look and feel like Enum.valueOf(Class, String). Fyi, i copied this method from here.

Index related issues (already discussed in depth here) still apply.

/**
 * Returns the {@link Enum} instance for a given ordinal.
 * This method is the index based alternative
 * to {@link Enum#valueOf(Class, String)}, which
 * requires the name of an instance.
 * 
 * @param <E> the enum type
 * @param type the enum class object
 * @param ordinal the index of the enum instance
 * @throws IndexOutOfBoundsException if ordinal < 0 || ordinal >= enums.length
 * @return the enum instance with the given ordinal
 */
public static <E extends Enum<E>> E valueOf(Class<E> type, int ordinal) {
    Preconditions.checkNotNull(type, "Type");
    final E[] enums = type.getEnumConstants();
    Preconditions.checkElementIndex(ordinal, enums.length, "ordinal");
    return enums[ordinal];
}
share|improve this answer
    
That's not really what I'm looking for, as this only retrieves enum values by their ordinal, not by an assigned integer id (see my question). Also, if I do want that, I can just use MyEnumType.values() - no need for a static helper method. –  sleske Feb 17 '11 at 14:00
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Both the .ordinal() and values()[i] are unstable since they are dependent to the order of enums. Thus if you change the order of enums or add/delete some your program would break.

Here is a simple yet effective method to map between enum and int.

public enum Action {
    ROTATE_RIGHT(0), ROTATE_LEFT(1), RIGHT(2), LEFT(3), UP(4), DOWN(5);

    public final int id;
    Action(int id) {
        this.id = id;
    }

    public static Action get(int id){
        for (Action a: Action.values()) {
            if (a.id == id)
                return a;
        }
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid id");
    }
}

Applying it for strings shouldn't be difficult.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I realize I could do that - or even better, use a map for the reverse lookup, rather than iterate through all values. I mentioned this in my question, and I also mentioned that I am looking for a better solution, to avoid having boilerplate code in each enum. –  sleske May 10 '13 at 10:22
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A very clean usage example of reverse Enum

Step 1 Define an Interface EnumConverter

public interface EnumConverter <E extends Enum<E> & EnumConverter<E>> {
    public String convert();
    E convert(String pKey);
}

Step 2

Create a class name ReverseEnumMap

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class ReverseEnumMap<V extends Enum<V> & EnumConverter<V>> {
    private Map<String, V> map = new HashMap<String, V>();

    public ReverseEnumMap(Class<V> valueType) {
        for (V v : valueType.getEnumConstants()) {
            map.put(v.convert(), v);
        }
    }

    public V get(String pKey) {
        return map.get(pKey);
    }
}

Step 3

Go to you Enum class and implement it with EnumConverter<ContentType> and of course override interface methods. You also need to initialize a static ReverseEnumMap.

public enum ContentType implements EnumConverter<ContentType> {
    VIDEO("Video"), GAME("Game"), TEST("Test"), IMAGE("Image");

    private static ReverseEnumMap<ContentType> map = new ReverseEnumMap<ContentType>(ContentType.class);

    private final String mName;

    ContentType(String pName) {
        this.mName = pName;
    }

    String value() {
        return this.mName;
    }

    @Override
    public String convert() {
        return this.mName;
    }

    @Override
    public ContentType convert(String pKey) {
        return map.get(pKey);
    }
}

Step 4

Now create a Communication class file and call it's new method to convert an Enum to String and String to Enum. I have just put main method for explanation purpose.

public class Communication<E extends Enum<E> & EnumConverter<E>> {
    private final E enumSample;

    public Communication(E enumSample) {
        this.enumSample = enumSample;
    }

    public String resolveEnumToStringValue(E e) {
        return e.convert();
    }

    public E resolveStringEnumConstant(String pName) {
        return enumSample.convert(pName);
    }

//Should not put main method here... just for explanation purpose. 
    public static void main(String... are) {
        Communication<ContentType> comm = new Communication<ContentType>(ContentType.GAME);
        comm.resolveEnumToStringValue(ContentType.GAME); //return Game
        comm.resolveStringEnumConstant("Game"); //return GAME (Enum)
    }
}

Click for for complete explanation

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1  
This I really, really like - I've been searching for a solid solution to this problem for some time now. The only change I made was to make ContentType convert(String pKey) static, which removes the need for the Communication class and was more to my liking. +1 –  Chris Mantle Oct 30 '13 at 20:51
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Int -->String :

public enum Country {

    US("US",0),
    UK("UK",2),
    DE("DE",1);


    private static Map<Integer, String> domainToCountryMapping; 
    private String country;
    private int domain;

    private Country(String country,int domain){
        this.country=country.toUpperCase();
        this.domain=domain;
    }

    public String getCountry(){
        return country;
    }


    public static String getCountry(String domain) {
        if (domainToCountryMapping == null) {
            initMapping();
        }

        if(domainToCountryMapping.get(domain)!=null){
            return domainToCountryMapping.get(domain);
        }else{
            return "US";
        }

    }

     private static void initMapping() {
         domainToCountryMapping = new HashMap<Integer, String>();
            for (Country s : values()) {
                domainToCountryMapping.put(s.domain, s.country);
            }
        }
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