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Let's say I have the following query.

SELECT ID, Email, ProductName, ProductModel FROM Products

How can I modify it so that it returns no duplicate Emails?

In other words, when several rows contain the same email, I want the results to include only one of those rows (preferably the last one). Duplicates in other columns should be allowed.

Clauses like DISTINCT and GROUP BY appear to work on entire rows. So I'm not sure how to approach this.

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2  
Ok, you need use PARTITION or use two select statements? –  Carnotaurus Feb 16 '11 at 20:25
    
And what should be shown if there are say 2 rows with same Email but different ProductName? The (preferably the last one) is not clear. Last by which ordering? –  ypercube Feb 16 '11 at 20:28
    
@ypercube As stated in the question, preferably the last one. However, that's not really critical to me. I just want one of them. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 16 '11 at 20:29
1  
You can look at the following questions: question1, question2 or question3. –  Marian Feb 16 '11 at 20:30

5 Answers 5

up vote 36 down vote accepted

If you are using SQL Server 2005 or above use this:

SELECT *
  FROM (
                SELECT  ID, 
                        Email, 
                        ProductName, 
                        ProductModel,
                        ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY Email ORDER BY ID DESC) rn
                    FROM Products
              ) a
WHERE rn = 1

EDIT: Example using a where clause:

SELECT *
  FROM (
                SELECT  ID, 
                        Email, 
                        ProductName, 
                        ProductModel,
                        ROW_NUMBER() OVER(PARTITION BY Email ORDER BY ID DESC) rn
                    FROM Products
                   WHERE ProductModel = 2
                     AND ProductName LIKE 'CYBER%'

              ) a
WHERE rn = 1
share|improve this answer
    
I must investigate this PARTITION clause, never seen it in action before. Thanks for the example –  LorenVS Feb 16 '11 at 20:41
    
@Cybernate Seems to work exactly right. Thanks! –  Jonathan Wood Feb 16 '11 at 20:58
    
@Cybernate One complication: My inner SELECT needs a WHERE condition. I'm thinking the row numbers will be assigned to all rows in the table. This syntax is just a little beyond me. Any chance of an update that would guarantee one row with a particular email that meets the WHERE condition? –  Jonathan Wood Feb 16 '11 at 21:12
    
You can add where clause to the inner sql. I will update the post once I can access my laptop –  Chandu Feb 16 '11 at 21:24
    
Updated the post with a sample using where clause. –  Chandu Feb 16 '11 at 22:05

This assumes SQL Server 2005+ and your definition of "last" is the max PK for a given email

;WITH CTE AS
(
SELECT ID, 
       Email, 
       ProductName, 
       ProductModel, 
       ROW_NUMBER() OVER (PARTITION BY Email ORDER BY ID DESC) AS RowNumber 
FROM   Products
)
SELECT ID, 
       Email, 
       ProductName, 
       ProductModel
FROM CTE 
WHERE RowNumber = 1
share|improve this answer

When you use DISTINCT think of it as a distinct row, not column. It will return only rows where the columns do not match exactly the same.

SELECT DISTINCT ID, Email, ProductName, ProductModel
FROM Products

----------------------
1 | something@something.com | ProductName1 | ProductModel1
2 | something@something.com | ProductName1 | ProductModel1

The query would return both rows because the ID column is different. I'm assuming that the ID column is an IDENTITY column that is incrementing, if you want to return the last then I recommend something like this:

SELECT DISTINCT TOP 1 ID, Email, ProductName, ProductModel
FROM Products
ORDER BY ID DESC

The TOP 1 will return only the first record, by ordering it by the ID descending it will return the results with the last row first. This will give you the last record.

share|improve this answer
    
As stated in the question, I see that DISTINCT works on the entire row. I want to do like you suggest above, but for every time the email is duplicated in the results (not just once). –  Jonathan Wood Feb 16 '11 at 20:37
    
In that case I would recommend going with @Cybernate answer. That should do exactly what you need. –  jon3laze Feb 16 '11 at 20:44

For Access, you can use the SQL Select query I present here:

For example you have this table:

CLIENTE|| NOMBRES || MAIL

888 || T800 ARNOLD || t800.arnold@cyberdyne.com

123 || JOHN CONNOR || s.connor@skynet.com

125 || SARAH CONNOR ||s.connor@skynet.com

And you need to select only distinct mails. You can do it with this:

SQL SELECT:

SELECT MAX(p.CLIENTE) AS ID_CLIENTE
, (SELECT TOP 1 x.NOMBRES 
    FROM Rep_Pre_Ene_MUESTRA AS x 
    WHERE x.MAIL=p.MAIL 
     AND x.CLIENTE=(SELECT MAX(l.CLIENTE) FROM Rep_Pre_Ene_MUESTRA AS l WHERE x.MAIL=l.MAIL)) AS NOMBRE, 
p.MAIL
FROM Rep_Pre_Ene_MUESTRA AS p
GROUP BY p.MAIL;

You can use this to select the maximum ID, the correspondent name to that maximum ID , you can add any other attribute that way. Then at the end you put the distinct column to filter and you only group it with that last distinct column.

This will bring you the maximum ID with the correspondent data, you can use min or any other functions and you replicate that function to the sub-queries.

This select will return:

CLIENTE|| NOMBRES || MAIL

888 || T800 ARNOLD || t800.arnold@cyberdyne.com

125 || SARAH CONNOR ||s.connor@skynet.com

Remember to index the columns you select and the distinct column must have not numeric data all in upper case or in lower case, or else it won't work. This will work with only one registered mail as well. Happy coding!!!

share|improve this answer

The reason DISTINCT and GROUP BY work on entire rows is that your query returns entire rows.

To help you understand: Try to write out by hand what the query should return and you will see that it is ambiguous what to put in the non-duplicated columns.

If you literally don't care what is in the other columns, don't return them. Returning a random row for each e-mail address seems a little useless to me.

share|improve this answer
    
@JohnFix I want to return whole rows. I just don't want rows to be returned when the results already include a row with the same value in the Email column. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 16 '11 at 20:33
    
So how should it decide which one to return? Do you really want a query that returns an arbitrary row for each e-mail. This really smells like you might need to re-think the problem you are trying to solve. Almost every time I've been asked this question (and it comes up a lot) it turns out the developer hasn't thought through the consequences in the app for this behavior. –  JohnFx Feb 16 '11 at 20:34
    
I'm really having trouble following your logic. As stated in the question, I would prefer the last one (sorted by ID). Yes, if it selected a random row that would be okay. And, yes, I've thought about it. –  Jonathan Wood Feb 16 '11 at 20:39

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