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The first part of my code gets the IQueryable data results:

var issues = repository.GetAllIssues().Where(i => 
                  i.IssueNotificationRecipients.Any(r => r.Status == "Open"));

Then I determine which sort order the user has requested, and add it:

switch (sort)
{
case 1:
    issues.OrderBy(x => x.Customer);
    break;
case 2:
    issues.OrderBy(x => x.Description);
    break;
case 3:
    issues.OrderBy(x => x.CreatedBy);
    break;
default:
    issues.OrderBy(x => x.DueDateTime);
    break;
}

This throws the error:

The method 'Skip' is only supported for sorted input in LINQ to Entities. The method 'OrderBy' must be called before the method 'Skip'

So how can I add the OrderBy dynamically, in response to my user's input?

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1  
Where is the Skip part? –  Alex Bagnolini Feb 16 '11 at 20:39

2 Answers 2

You haven't shown us all of your code, but one problem is that you're expecting issues.OrderBy(..) to mutate the queryable referred to by the issues variable. But it doesn't actually do that; it returns a new IOrderedQueryable that represents an ordered version of the original queryable.

Since your ordering operations aren't actually touching the queryable referred to be your issues variable; it makes sense that calling Skip on it results in the error that you're getting, because it hasn't actually been sorted.

You probably want to do:

issues = issues.OrderBy(...);
share|improve this answer
    
This answer was a life saver! Most of my entities I call ToList in my service classes because I return small numbers of records. I started using IQueryable to return larger sets and I couldn't figure out why OrderBy was not working. Using a different variable returns IOrderedQueryable which fixed everything. Thanks. –  nameEqualsPNamePrubeGoldberg Dec 1 '11 at 0:45

Did you perhaps mean

switch (sort)
{
case 1:
    issues = issues.OrderBy(x => x.Customer);
    break;
case 2:
    issues = issues.OrderBy(x => x.Description);
    break;
case 3:
    issues = issues.OrderBy(x => x.CreatedBy);
    break;
default:
    issues = issues.OrderBy(x => x.DueDateTime);
    break;
}

You may need to change the type of issues, or set it to a new variable, since it returns IOrderedQueryable<T>

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Exactly what I was typing. –  Sorax Feb 16 '11 at 20:39

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