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I'm only vaguely familiar with making setups, and I have been asked to create a setup that distributes a pre-built ClickOnce deployment package for an Excel add-in that uses VSTO. The problem: the customer should be able to change a parameter in an (already signed) config file.

What I have found is that according to http://blogs.msdn.com/b/vsto/archive/2009/04/29/signing-and-re-signing-manifests-in-clickonce.aspx, I can update and re-sign the package, but as I want to do this during installation, it looks like I need to include mage.exe and our certificate during the installation process. Presumably, I can do this and still remove them before the installation completes.

My question: Is the best option to write the moral equivalent of a batch file that does an update and sign of the manifests, or is there a pre-existing custom action or similar function that I've just not noticed.

Tell me if more info is needed.


More Info: The point of contention is a setting within the .config file that tells it where the webservice that provides its information is. This will change for each customer, being on their intranet, and we can't / don't want to create an install customized for each customer. We're taking advantage of the ClickOnce's deployment capabilities so that once the add-in is on the user's system, it has the info it needs, which would be set up once by an administrator.

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Why would you do this during your install? This is typically a build activity? Do you really want to distribute your private key in the install? –  Christopher Painter Feb 16 '11 at 22:42
    
I don't really want to distribute it, but as far as I know, it's not avoidable. The app includes a .config file that an central user (admin, but not necessarily with admin knowledge) modifies through the installer before it's distributed to multiple users. To use the ClickOnce .deploy, it has to be signed, also. We don't know all the variations necessary, and don't want to do a custom build for each customer. –  jrnewman42 Feb 17 '11 at 18:13
    
I've done AllUsers MSI that had ClickOnce internally and basically I signed it before packaging in MSI. Then when I wired the addin to my offfice application I used the |VSTOLOCAL option. –  Christopher Painter Feb 18 '11 at 3:11

2 Answers 2

What sort of option are you changing (is there a better way?), and how many possible values are there for this option? If it's just two or three values, consider pre-building each of these variants and installing the selected one. If it's too many to pre-build, see Christopher's comment about distributing your private key: you should drop that plan unless you're going to create a key on the fly.

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Unfortunately, I don't have much control over that part of the design, and I don't know if there's another / better way. Forgive the copy paste, but "The app includes a .config file that an central user (admin, but not necessarily with admin knowledge) modifies through the installer before it's distributed to multiple users. To use the ClickOnce .deploy, it has to be signed, also. We don't know all the variations necessary, and don't want to do a custom build for each customer." –  jrnewman42 Feb 17 '11 at 18:15
    
I don't get how you're supposed to make a change with your installer without knowing what the change is. –  Michael Urman Feb 18 '11 at 4:25
    
I'm beginning to suspect it's a design flaw. We're passing in a string indicating connection info that will be put into a .config file. The connection info will be different for each customer, as it'll refer to a local web service. However, if that config file is changed, then any previous signature doesn't apply, and I need to re-sign it. My thought was that if the setup could take care of signing, then the changing config file would not be an issue. –  jrnewman42 Feb 21 '11 at 18:25

It turns out the answer is "don't!". I was able to convince the developer to have the application download updated configuration information after it was deployed from a central location, which bypassed this particular mess.

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