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Django has some good automatic serialization of ORM models returned from DB to JSON format.

How to serialize SQLAlchemy query result to JSON format?

I tried jsonpickle.encode but it encodes query object itself. I tried json.dumps(items) but it returns

TypeError: <Product('3', 'some name', 'some desc')> is not JSON serializable

Is it really so hard to serialize SQLAlchemy ORM objects to JSON /XML? Isn't there any default serializer for it? It's very common task to serialize ORM query results nowadays.

What I need is just to return JSON or XML data representation of SQLAlchemy query result.

SQLAlchemy objects query result in JSON/XML format is needed to be used in javascript datagird (JQGrid http://www.trirand.com/blog/)

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5 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It is not so straighforward. I wrote some code to do this. I'm still working on it, and it uses the MochiKit framework. It basically translates compound objects between Python and Javascript using a proxy and registered JSON converters.

Browser side for database objects is db.js It needs the basic Python proxy source in proxy.js.

On the Python side there is the base proxy module. Then finally the SqlAlchemy object encoder in webserver.py. It also depends on metadata extractors found in the models.py file.

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Quite complicated from the first glance... What I need - is to get SQLAlchemy objects query result in JSON/XML format to use it in javascript datagird (JQGrid trirand.com/blog) –  Zelid Feb 16 '11 at 22:33
    
Sometimes problems are more complicated than you exect at first glance... This handles objects returned as foreign keys, and tries to avoid the infinite recursion that happens with deeply nested relations. However, you could probably write some custom queries that return base types only and serialize those with simplejson directly. –  Keith Feb 16 '11 at 22:40
1  
Right, maybe I'll really go with querying for dicts using SQLAlchemy and will use benefits of ORM performing save/update actions only. –  Zelid Feb 16 '11 at 22:54
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A flat implementation

You could use something like this:

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import DeclarativeMeta
class AlchemyEncoder(json.JSONEncoder):
def default(self, obj):
    if isinstance(obj.__class__, DeclarativeMeta):
        # an SQLAlchemy class
        fields = {}
        for field in [x for x in dir(obj) if not x.startswith('_') and x != 'metadata']:
            data = obj.__getattribute__(field)
            try:
                json.dumps(data) # this will fail on non-encodable values, like other classes
                fields[field] = data
            except TypeError:
                fields[field] = None
        # a json-encodable dict
        return fields

    return json.JSONEncoder.default(self, obj)

and then convert to JSON using:

c = YourAlchemyClass()
print json.dumps(c, cls=AlchemyEncoder)

It will ignore fields that are not encodable (set them to 'None').

It doesn't auto-expand relations (since this could lead to self-references, and loop forever).

A recursive, non-circular implementation

If, however, you'd rather loop forever, you could use:

from sqlalchemy.ext.declarative import DeclarativeMeta
    def new_alchemy_encoder():
        _visited_objs = []
        class AlchemyEncoder(json.JSONEncoder):
            def default(self, obj):
                if isinstance(obj.__class__, DeclarativeMeta):
                    # don't re-visit self
                    if obj in _visited_objs:
                        return None
                    _visited_objs.append(obj)

                    # an SQLAlchemy class
                    fields = {}
                    for field in [x for x in dir(obj) if not x.startswith('_') and x != 'metadata']:
                        fields[field] = obj.__getattribute__(field)
                    # a json-encodable dict
                    return fields

                return json.JSONEncoder.default(self, obj)
        return AlchemyEncoder

And then encode objects using:

print json.dumps(e, cls=new_alchemy_encoder(), check_circular=False)

This would encode all children, and all their children, and all their children... Potentially encode your entire database, basically. When it reaches something its encoded before, it will encode it as 'None'.

A recursive, possibly-circular, selective implementation

Another alternative, probably better, is to be able to specify the fields you want to expand:

def new_alchemy_encoder(revisit_self = False, fields_to_expand = []):
    _visited_objs = []
    class AlchemyEncoder(json.JSONEncoder):
        def default(self, obj):
            if isinstance(obj.__class__, DeclarativeMeta):
                # don't re-visit self
                if revisit_self:
                    if obj in _visited_objs:
                        return None
                    _visited_objs.append(obj)

                # go through each field in this SQLalchemy class
                fields = {}
                for field in [x for x in dir(obj) if not x.startswith('_') and x != 'metadata']:
                    val = obj.__getattribute__(field)

                    # is this field another SQLalchemy object, or a list of SQLalchemy objects?
                    if isinstance(val.__class__, DeclarativeMeta) or (isinstance(val, list) and len(val) > 0 and isinstance(val[0].__class__, DeclarativeMeta)):
                        # unless we're expanding this field, stop here
                        if field not in fields_to_expand:
                            # not expanding this field: set it to None and continue
                            fields[field] = None
                            continue

                    fields[field] = val
                # a json-encodable dict
                return fields

            return json.JSONEncoder.default(self, obj)
    return AlchemyEncoder

You can now call it with:

print json.dumps(e, cls=new_alchemy_encoder(False, ['parents']), check_circular=False)

To only expand SQLAlchemy fields called 'parents', for example.

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that's a great response, however I get a "could not encode "BaseQuery" whenever it hits a relationship with the non-flat methods, any ideas? –  Ben Kilah Nov 4 '13 at 23:29
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You can convert a RowProxy to a dict like this:

 d = dict(row.items())

Then serialize that to JSON ( you will have to specify an encoder for things like datetime values ) It's not that hard if you just want one record ( and not a full hierarchy of related records ).

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You could just output your object as a dict:

class User:
   def as_dict(self):
       return {c.name: getattr(self, c.name) for c in self.__table__.columns}

And then you use User.as_dict() to serialize your object.

As explained in Convert sqlalchemy row object to python dict

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5  
The most sane answer so far :) –  maxm Jan 25 '13 at 5:03
    
@charlax, How'd I fix a DateTime? By using this I get 'datetime.datetime(2013, 3, 22, 16, 50, 11) is not JSON serializable' when I do json.dumps –  Asken Mar 22 '13 at 16:07
    
It's the responsibility of the JSONEncoder object. You can subclass it to define your own encoder for some object, including datetime. Note that Flask, for instance, support encoding datetime in JSON out of the box (with the latest version). –  charlax Mar 22 '13 at 20:40
1  
If you use sqlalchemy's "declarative" method you can add something like this to a custom Base class - this is pretty handy as you can then call my_orm_object.toDict() on any ORM object you have. Similarly you can define a .toJSON() method which uses your toDict method and a custom encoder for handling dates, blobs etc –  FredL Apr 15 '13 at 10:17
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I recommend using a recent surfaced library marshmallow. It allows you to create serializers to represent your model instances with support to relations and nested objects.

Have a look at theier SQLAlchemy Example.

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