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The following code simply prints the word "hi" when run.

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

class poly
{
    public static void main(String c)
    {
        System.out.println("enter a char");
        InputStreamReader ir=new InputStreamReader(System.in);
        BufferedReader br =new BufferedReader(ir);
        //char l= br.readLine();
        System.out.println("this is "+c);
    }

    public static void main(String args[]) throws Exception
    {
        System.out.println("hi");
    }
}

Is there a way to overload the main() method?

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1  
What does this have to do with C? –  EboMike Feb 16 '11 at 21:12
1  
What problem is it that you really are trying to solve? –  birryree Feb 16 '11 at 21:14
2  
@EboMike, notice that the overloaded version of main takes a parameter String c :-) –  Péter Török Feb 16 '11 at 21:41
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6 Answers 6

Your program only starts at one location, so that makes no sense. Furthermore, polymorphism is a totally different concept; that's called overloading, not polymorphism.

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What you are trying to do is overloading the main method, not making it polymorphic. And no, you can't do it (or to be precise: overload you can, just the JVM won't call the overloaded versions). The JVM is looking for a main method with a specific signature, namely taking a String[] parameter.

Maybe if you tell us more about the actual problem you are trying to solve, we can offer alternative solutions.

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The code is correct, you've overloaded the main method. But, as Peter mentioned, the main thread of an application will always start at the method with the signature

 public static void main(String[] args)

and nothing else. For starting an application, JVM will ignore all other main methods. To execute the content, you'll have to call it in your code, like so:

 public static void main(String args[]) {
    main("me");
 }

(Should print "this is me" to the console)

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You can overload a main method in Java; however, getting the classloader to start from the overloaded main method is going to be quite a trick.

The class you pass the the java executable is inspected, it's static methods are read, and control is passed off to only the one that looks like

public static void main(String[] args) { ... }

Since this is a static method, and Java does not have the concept of inheriting static methods, you have no way to overload this method. Since Java does not have the concept of inheritance of static methods, sub-classing the static bits of a class is a nonsensical idea.

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After that polymorphise comment, I made sure to use all real words :) –  Edwin Buck Feb 16 '11 at 21:29
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Maybe you want something like this?

import java.util.*;
import java.io.*;

class poly {

   public static void main(String c)
   {
      System.out.println("enter a char");
      InputStreamReader ir=new InputStreamReader(System.in);
      BufferedReader br =new BufferedReader(ir);
      //char l= br.readLine();
      System.out.println("this is "+c);

   }
   public static void main(String args[])throws Exception
   {
       if (args.length == 1) {
          poly.main(args[0]);
       }
       else {
          System.out.println("hi");
       }
   }
}
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The java runtime environment only looks for the exact match to public static void main(String[]), which is defined as the entry-point for standalone java applications.

To simulate the behaviour you want you have to call the other main yourself:

/**
* Your method called main, ignored by the java runtime since
* it does not match the signature. Called by the valid main(String[]) 
**/
public static void main(String c)
    {
    System.out.println("enter a char");
    InputStreamReader ir=new InputStreamReader(System.in);
    BufferedReader br =new BufferedReader(ir);
    //char l= br.readLine();
    System.out.println("this is "+c);

}
/**
* Starting point of your program, called by the java runtime.
*/
public static void main(String args[])throws Exception
    {
    if(args.length >= 1){
       main(args[0]);

    }else{

        System.out.println("hi");
    }
}

As others point out having several methods with the same name but different parameters is called over*loading* and not polymorphism (over*writing*).

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