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I have to integrate with a third-party web-service (behind firewall), and I do have their WSDL and proxy class. I want to develop the client stuff outside the firewall.

What is the best approach to mock the web-service to ease integration with them?

Do I create a web-service project on my side? Somehow use their proxy classes ad mock the methods? This would create the service references so I can just change the target URL when the time comes. Or do I create a service layer that returns mock classes in my dev. environment but would use real web-services at run-time? The former approach would take a lot of work, I would think.

Any ideas?

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With just the WSDL, you could host a mock service using soapUI.

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I've used the latter approach to good effect in our projects. I've usually found that my apps use a subset of the functionality exposed by a given web service's API, to it's usually made good sense to expose a simpler API to my client code that's more streamlined and that reflects the workflow of my client better. So, since the way I typically use web services already involves writing an abstraction layer, replacing the endpoint on the other side of my adapter classes with a mock service is a very low-friction way to test interaction with the service.

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thx for the response. I consume all service methods of their service and need more of a a wrapper. I'm going to host a wrapper service on my network connected to their VPN. The problem is that we need to be on our LAN. But then, any machine on my LAN can hit the wrapper which will then invoke their service (via VPN).Let's see – Ra. Feb 17 '11 at 2:01

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