Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Does guava (or another java library) have something like reduce() function in Python?

I'm looking for something like this http://docs.python.org/library/functions.html#reduce

share|improve this question
2  
Java SE 8 will probably add Collections.reduce once lambdas are added. FWIW Python 3 encourages an explicit for-loop instead of reduce; reduce was moved from the built-ins to the functools module. –  ide Feb 17 '11 at 0:27
1  
@ide: It may well even have a Collection.reduce method, given that there will be extension methods. I know they plan to add stuff like filter and map as extension methods. –  ColinD Feb 17 '11 at 1:11
1  
Does code.google.com/p/lambdaj ? Not sure so just a comment... –  CurtainDog Feb 17 '11 at 2:48
1  
Have a look at functionaljava.org –  gpampara Feb 18 '11 at 7:54
    

7 Answers 7

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I've not (yet) managed to find any Java collections libraries that support map and reduce. (I exclude map/reduce functionality in parallel / distributed processing frameworks ... because you need a "big" problem for these frameworks to be worthwhile.)

Probably, the reason for this "lack" is that map/reduce coding without closures is just too cumbersome. Too much boilerplate code, too much heavy-weight syntax. Since the main point of using map / reduce primitives on simple collections is to make your code simple and elegant ...


@CurtainDog contributed a link to lambdaj. That does the kind of thing that the OP is after (though there's no method specifically called reduce). But it illustrates what I was saying about boilerplate. Notice that many of the higher order operations involve creating classes that extend one or other of the Closure classes.

(FWIW, I think that the Lambda.aggregate(...) methods are the lambdaj analog of reduce.)

share|improve this answer
    
@user359996 - You've just linked to the root of the Guava javadoc tree. What's the point of that? –  Stephen C Oct 12 '11 at 7:04
2  
Believe it or not, that wasn't on purpose. Here is the correct link: docs.guava-libraries.googlecode.com/git-history/v10.0.1/javadoc/… –  user359996 Oct 12 '11 at 15:33

I have developed a library to do map/filter/reduce with standard J2SE. Sorry it is in french, but with google translate you can read it : http://caron-yann.developpez.com/tutoriels/java/fonction-object-design-pattern-attendant-closures-java-8/

You can use if like this :

int sum = dogs.filter(new Predicate<Arguments2<Dog, Integer>>() {

    @Override
    public Boolean invoke(Arguments2<Dog, Integer> arguments) {
        // filter on male
        return arguments.getArgument1().getGender() == Dog.Gender.MALE;
    }
}).<Integer>map(new Function<Integer, Arguments2<Dog, Integer>>() {

    @Override
    public Integer invoke(Arguments2<Dog, Integer> arguments) {
        // get ages
        return arguments.getArgument1().getAge();
    }
}).reduce(new Function<Integer, Arguments2<Integer, Integer>>() {

    @Override
    public Integer invoke(Arguments2<Integer, Integer> arguments) {
        // sum âges
        return arguments.getArgument1() + arguments.getArgument2();
    }
});

System.out.println("Le cumul de l'âge des mâles est de : " + sum + " ans");

Enjoy this help

share|improve this answer

Use Totally Lazy, it implements all of those things an even more. It basicly copied the whole funcional approach from Clojure.

share|improve this answer

Guava has transform (map). Seems like reduce is missing though?

share|improve this answer

Jedi has a reduce operation. Jedi also helps reduce the boiler plate by using annotations to generate functors for you. See these examples.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 jedi is super-wicked-sweet –  Toby Jul 1 '11 at 10:51

I have recently submitted an issue where I requested / discussed something similar. This is what would be needed in my implementation

/**
 * Aggregate the selected values from the supplied {@link Iterable} using
 * the provided selector and aggregator functions.
 * 
 * @param <I>
 *            the element type over which to iterate
 * @param <S>
 *            type of the values to be aggregated
 * @param <A>
 *            type of the aggregated value
 * @param data
 *            elements for aggregation
 * @param selectorFunction
 *            a selector function that extracts the values to be aggregated
 *            from the elements
 * @param aggregatorFunction
 *            function that performs the aggregation on the selected values
 * @return the aggregated value
 */
public static <I, S, A> A aggregate(final Iterable<I> data,
    final Function<I, S> selectorFunction,
    final Function<Iterable<S>, A> aggregatorFunction){
    checkNotNull(aggregatorFunction);
    return aggregatorFunction.apply(
        Iterables.transform(data, selectorFunction)
    );
}

(The selector function can pull the value to aggregate from the object to query, but in many cases it will be Functions.identity(), i.e. the object itself is what's aggregated)

This is not a classic fold, but it requires a Function<Iterable<X>,X> to do the work. But since the actual code is a one-liner, I have instead chosen to request some standard aggregator functions (I'd put them in a class called something like Aggregators, AggregatorFunctions or even Functions.Aggregators):

/** A Function that returns the average length of the Strings in an Iterable. */
public static Function<Iterable<String>,Integer> averageLength()

/** A Function that returns a BigDecimal that corresponds to the average
    of all numeric values passed from the iterable. */
public static Function<Iterable<? extends Number>,BigDecimal> averageOfFloats()

/** A Function that returns a BigInteger that corresponds to the average
    of all numeric values passed from the iterable. */
public static Function<Iterable<? extends Number>,BigInteger> averageOfIntegers()

/** A Function that returns the length of the longest String in an Iterable. */    
public static Function<Iterable<String>,Integer> maxLength()

/** A Function that returns the length of the shortest String in an Iterable. */
public static Function<Iterable<String>,Integer> minLength()

/** A Function that returns a BigDecimal that corresponds to the sum of all
    numeric values passed from the iterable. */
public static Function<Iterable<? extends Number>,BigDecimal> sumOfFloats()

/** A Function that returns a BigInteger that corresponds to the integer sum
    of all numeric values passed from the iterable. */
public static Function<Iterable<? extends Number>,BigInteger> sumOfIntegers()

(You can see my sample implementations in the issue)

That way, you can do things like this:

int[] numbers = { 1, 5, 6, 9, 11111, 54764576, 425623 };
int sum = Aggregators.sumOfIntegers().apply(Ints.asList(numbers)).intValue();

This is definitely not what you are asking for, but it would make like easier in many cases and would overlap with your request (even if the approach is different).

share|improve this answer

No. It might eventually, though functional stuff like that isn't a core focus of Guava. See this issue.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.