Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make this layout happen without javascript.

I have a parent div and a child div that contains content which keeps being appended. I want the child to be bottom aligned inside the parent and grow vertically. I also want the parent div to scroll when the height of the child > height of parent.

Child expands from the bottom, causing parent to scroll

The first part is pretty easy with:

#child { position:absolute; bottom: 0 }

The second part is difficult because absolutely positioned elements are outside of the content-flow and won't trigger scrolling.


Edit

The parent div spans the entire height of the browser window (which I don't know at design-time)

share|improve this question
    
Any chance you could put your example up on jsfiddle? –  Dan Feb 17 '11 at 4:17
    
Here is a JSFiddle with-out the bottom alignment: jsfiddle.net/epgdn/1 I'm trying to achieve bottom alignment when the child is smaller and auto-scroll when it's bigger than the parent. –  Daniel Beardsley Feb 17 '11 at 7:43
add comment

2 Answers 2

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Edited to show that it is possible

Turns out it IS possible to provide the dynamic layout described without using javascript. There is a way (using just CSS) to have a div bottom aligned that causes scrolling when it overflows it's parent.

The trick is to make the scrolling happen on the child, setting it's max-height to 100% (i.e. the parents height) and then bottom aligning the child with position:absolute;. You only need to make sure the parent has position:relative or absolute.

Here is the simple CSS to make it work:

#parent{
    position:absolute;
    /* these parts are obviously not necessary */
    width:500px;
    top:10px;
    bottom:10px;
}
#child{
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0px;
    right:0px;
    left:0px;
    overflow-y:auto;
    /* this is the key */
    max-height:100%;
}

This is reflected in the following jsfiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/epgdn/5/ simply resize the run-window until the child is bigger than the parent and the parent will scroll appropriately.

share|improve this answer
1  
You saved my day, thank you! –  Roman Mar 5 '12 at 10:26
    
You are so cool –  Gastón Sánchez Jul 3 '13 at 20:44
    
The scrollbars still show up even when the content is smaller than the container. So if the content is half of the parents height, there will be vertical scrollbars half of the height. –  Gavin Aug 18 '13 at 10:14
add comment

You won't be able to do this with CSS alone. If you position the child at top:0, you'd be fine since the page is being processed from top down (so do the scroll bars).

body { font-size:1.2em; height:50%; color:#735005; }
div { margin:0; padding:0; }
#parent {
    border:1px solid red;
    height:100%; max-height:400px;
    overflow:auto;
    position:relative;
    width:300px;
    }
#child, #child2 {    /* #child2 is STRICTLY here to illustrate the desired effect */
    border:1px solid blue;
    position:absolute;
    bottom:0;
    }
#child2 { visibility:hidden; top:0; }

  <div id="parent">
     <div id="child">scroll scroll scroll ... scroll scroll scroll scroll</div>
     <div id="child2">scroll scroll scroll ... scroll scroll scroll scroll</div>
  </div>

Obviously, you don't want to hard code duplicate code for a UI effect. Server-/client-side scripting would be needed.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.