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I'm writing a class for a simple game of 4 in a row, but I'm running into a problem calling a method in the same class. Here's the whole class for the sake of completeness:

class Grid:
    grid = None
    # creates a new empty 10 x 10 grid
    def reset():
        Grid.grid = [[0] * 10 for i in range(10)]
    # places an X or O
    def place(player,x,y):
        Grid.grid[x][y] = player
    # returns the element in the grid
    def getAt(x,y):
        return Grid.grid[x][y]
    # checks for wins in a certain direction
    def checkLine(player,v,count,x,y):
        x = x+v[0]
        y = y+v[1]
        if x < 0 or x > 9:
            return
        if y < 0 or y > 9:
            return
        if Grid.grid[x][y] == p:
            count = count+1
            if count == 4:
                return True
            checkLine(player,v,count,x,y)
        return False
    # returns the number of the player that won
    def check():
        i = 'i'
        for x in range(0,10):
            for y in range(0,10):
                if Grid.grid[x][y] > 0:
                    p = Grid.grid[x][y]
                    f = checkLine(p,0,array(i,[1,0]),x,y)
                    if f:
                        return p
                    f = checkLine(p,0,array(i,[0,1]),x,y)
                    if f:
                        return p
                    f = checkLine(p,0,array(i,[1,1]),x,y)
                    if f:
                        return p
                    f = checkLine(p,0,array(i,[-1,0]),x,y)
                    if f:
                        return p
                    f = checkLine(p,0,array(i,[0,-1]),x,y)
                    if f:
                        return p
                    f = checkLine(p,0,array(i,[-1,-1]),x,y)
                    if f:
                        return p
                    f = checkLine(p,0,array(i,[1,-1]),x,y)
                    if f:
                        return p
                    f = checkLine(p,0,array(i,[-1,1]),x,y)
                    if f:
                        return p
        return 0
    reset = staticmethod(reset)
    place = staticmethod(place)
    getAt = staticmethod(getAt)
    check = staticmethod(check)
    checkLine = staticmethod(checkLine)

I'm trying to call checkLine() from check(), but I get the error "NameError: global name 'checkLine' is not defined". When I call Grid.checkLine() instead, I get "TypeError: 'module' object is not callable"

How do I call checkLine()?

EDIT:

@beer_monk

class Grid(object):
    grid = None
    # creates a new empty 10 x 10 grid
    def reset(self):
        Grid.grid = [[0] * 10 for i in range(10)]
    # places an X or O
    def place(self,player,x,y):
        Grid.grid[x][y] = player
    # returns the element in the grid
    def getAt(self,x,y):
        return Grid.grid[x][y]
    # checks for wins in a certain direction
    def checkLine(self,player,v,count,x,y):
        x = x+v[0]
        y = y+v[1]
        if x < 0 or x > 9:
            return
        if y < 0 or y > 9:
            return
        if Grid.grid[x][y] == p:
            count = count+1
            if count == 4:
                return True
            checkLine(self,player,v,count,x,y)
        return False
    # returns the number of the player that won
    def check(self):
        i = 'i'
        for x in range(0,10):
            for y in range(0,10):
                if Grid.grid[x][y] > 0:
                    p = Grid.grid[x][y]
                    for vx in range(-1,2):
                        for vy in range(-1,2):
                            f = self.checkLine(p,0,array(i,[vx,vy]),x,y)
                            if f:
                                return p
        return 0
    reset = staticmethod(reset)
    place = staticmethod(place)
    getAt = staticmethod(getAt)
    check = staticmethod(check)
    checkLine = staticmethod(checkLine)
share|improve this question
    
what version of python? – Foo Bah Feb 17 '11 at 2:12
    
I'm using 2.7.1 – exodrifter Feb 17 '11 at 2:14
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Get rid of the class. Use plain functions and module level variable for grid. The class is not helping you in any way.

PS. If you really want to call checkline from within the class, you'd call Grid.checkline. For example:

class Foo:
    @staticmethod
    def test():
        print('Hi')
    @staticmethod
    def test2():
        Foo.test()

Foo.test2()       

prints

Hi
share|improve this answer
    
I did do that, but I got a TypeError: 'module' object is not callable error. – exodrifter Feb 17 '11 at 2:11
1  
If you change checkLine --> Grid.checkLine, and add Grid.reset() and Grid.check() at the end, the code you posted runs with no errors raised. But really the answer is to stop using the class, or stop using staticmethods. As it stands, you're not using classes as they were intended. – unutbu Feb 17 '11 at 2:24
    
It runs with no errors, but that's because if Grid.grid[x][y] > 0: always evaluates to false when the grid is reset, meaning the call to checkLine() is never reached. Sorry, I'll do it properly next time :x – exodrifter Feb 17 '11 at 2:53

Unlike java or c++, in python all class methods must accept the class instance as the first variable. In pretty much every single python code ive seen, the object is referred to as self. For example:

def reset(self):
    self.grid = [[0] * 10 for i in range(10)]

See http://docs.python.org/tutorial/classes.html

Note that in other languages, the translation is made automatically

share|improve this answer
    
You missed the fact that he turns them all into static methods at the bottom. – Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Feb 17 '11 at 2:02

There are multiple problems in your class definition. You have not defined array which you are using in your code. Also in the checkLine call you are sending a int, and in its definition you are trying to subscript it. Leaving those aside, I hope you realize that you are using staticmethods for all your class methods here. In that case, whenever you are caling your methods within your class, you still need to call them via your class's class object. So, within your class, when you are calling checkLine, call it is as Grid.checkLine That should resolve your NameError problem.

Also, it looks like there is some problem with your module imports. You might have imported a Module by name Grid and you have having a class called Grid here too. That Python is thinking that you are calling your imported modules Grid method,which is not callable. (I think,there is not a full-picture available here to see why the TypeError is resulting)

The best way to resolve the problem, use Classes as they are best used, namely create objects and call methods on those objects. Also use proper namespaces. And for all these you may start with some good introductory material, like Python tutorial.

share|improve this answer
    
reset() will always be called before actual use of the class, which is why I didn't bother defining it when I instantiated it. I did call Grid.checkLine(), but, as I said in the question, it throws TypeError: 'module' object is not callable. I do not import a module called Grid, and I did post a fully contained example of what I'm trying to run in Python. – exodrifter Feb 17 '11 at 2:37
    
How is array defined and how will checkLine work when you are sending 0 and subscripting it? (I did not get the TypeError when I called it via Grid.CheckLine, but stumbled upon the above two). – Senthil Kumaran Feb 17 '11 at 2:45
    
The array isn't defined until you call Grid.reset(), which sets the array to a 10 x 10 grid of 0. And what do you mean if I send 0? – exodrifter Feb 17 '11 at 2:53
    
I am sorry,but i dont see array being defined anywhere. Also, look at how you are calling checkLin, checkLine(p,0,..,..,..) and in it's definition you can doing v[0] and v[0]. Here v is 0 and will raise Exception. – Senthil Kumaran Feb 17 '11 at 2:59

A reworked example (hopefully showing a better use of classes!)

import itertools

try:
    rng = xrange   # Python 2.x
except NameError:
    rng = range    # Python 3.x

class Turn(object):
    def __init__(self, players):
        self.players = itertools.cycle(players)
        self.next()

    def __call__(self):
        return self.now

    def next(self):
        self.now = self.players.next()

class Grid(object):
    EMPTY = ' '
    WIDTH = 10
    HEIGHT = 10
    WINLENGTH = 4

    def __init__(self, debug=False):
        self.debug = debug
        self.grid = [Grid.EMPTY*Grid.WIDTH for i in rng(Grid.HEIGHT)]
        self.player = Turn(['X','O'])

    def set(self, x, y):
        if self.grid[y][x]==Grid.EMPTY:
            t = self.grid[y]
            self.grid[y] = t[:x] + self.player() + t[x+1:]
            self.player.next()
        else:
            raise ValueError('({0},{1}) is already taken'.format(x,y))

    def get(self, x, y):
        return self.grid[y][x]

    def __str__(self):
        corner = '+'
        hor = '='
        ver = '|'
        res = [corner + hor*Grid.WIDTH + corner]
        for row in self.grid[::-1]:
            res.append(ver + row + ver)
        res.append(corner + hor*Grid.WIDTH + corner)
        return '\n'.join(res)

    def _check(self, s):
        if self.debug: print("Check '{0}'".format(s))
        # Exercise left to you!
        # See if a winning string exists in s
        # If so, return winning player char; else False
        return False

    def _checkVert(self):
        if self.debug: print("Check verticals")
        for x in rng(Grid.WIDTH):
            winner = self._check([self.get(x,y) for y in rng(Grid.HEIGHT)])
            if winner:
                return winner
        return False

    def _checkHoriz(self):
        if self.debug: print("Check horizontals")
        for y in rng(Grid.HEIGHT):
            winner = self._check([self.get(x,y) for x in rng(Grid.WIDTH)])
            if winner:
                return winner
        return False

    def _checkUpdiag(self):
        if self.debug: print("Check up-diagonals")
        for y in rng(Grid.HEIGHT-Grid.WINLENGTH+1):
            winner = self._check([self.get(d,y+d) for d in rng(min(Grid.HEIGHT-y, Grid.WIDTH))])
            if winner:
                return winner
        for x in rng(1, Grid.WIDTH-Grid.WINLENGTH+1):
            winner = self._check([self.get(x+d,d) for d in rng(min(Grid.WIDTH-x, Grid.HEIGHT))])
            if winner:
                return winner
        return False

    def _checkDowndiag(self):
        if self.debug: print("Check down-diagonals")
        for y in rng(Grid.WINLENGTH-1, Grid.HEIGHT):
            winner = self._check([self.get(d,y-d) for d in rng(min(y+1, Grid.WIDTH))])
            if winner:
                return winner
        for x in rng(1, Grid.WIDTH-Grid.WINLENGTH+1):
            winner = self._check([self.get(x+d,d) for d in rng(min(Grid.WIDTH-x, Grid.HEIGHT))])
            if winner:
                return winner
        return False

    def isWin(self):
        "Return winning player or False"
        return self._checkVert() or self._checkHoriz() or self._checkUpdiag() or self._checkDowndiag()

def test():
    g = Grid()
    for o in rng(Grid.WIDTH-1):
        g.set(0,o)
        g.set(Grid.WIDTH-1-o,0)
        g.set(Grid.WIDTH-1,Grid.HEIGHT-1-o)
        g.set(o,Grid.HEIGHT-1)
    print(g)
    return g

g = test()
print g.isWin()
share|improve this answer

Instead of operating on an object, you are actually modifying the class itself. Python lets you do that, but it's not really what classes are for. So you run into a couple problems

-You will never be able to make multiple Grids this way

  • the Grid can't refer back to itself and e.g. call checkLine

After your grid definition, try instantiating your grid and calling methods on it like this

aGrid = Grid()
...
aGrid.checkLine()

To do that you, you first need to modify all of the method definitions to take "self" as your first variable and in check, call self.checkLine()

def check(self):
    ...
    self.checkLine()
    ...

Also, your repeated checking cries out for a FOR loop. You don't need to write out the cases.

share|improve this answer
    
I was being lazy, sorry. I'll optimize it after I figure this one out xD – exodrifter Feb 17 '11 at 2:15
    
What do I pass as self though, when I call on the method? Python is complaining that TypeError: reset() takes exactly 1 argument (0 given) when i change reset() to reset(self) – exodrifter Feb 17 '11 at 2:21
    
You don't pass anything, just ignore it, it is automagically passed in. What does your line of code calling reset() look like? If you're calling it from within another method, it should be something like self.reset(). If you're calling it from outside of the class, it should be something like aGrid.reset(). – beer_monk Feb 17 '11 at 2:23
    
@beer_monk I changed reset() to reset(self) and outside of the class I did aGrid = Grid() then aGrid.reset(). Python throws TypeError: reset() takes exactly 1 argument (0 given) – exodrifter Feb 17 '11 at 2:29
    
@DDT hmm you're still calling it on the class somehow. can you update your code in your post? – beer_monk Feb 17 '11 at 2:33

Syntax:

class_Name.function_Name(self)

Example:

Turn.checkHoriz(self)
share|improve this answer

Java programmer as well here, here is how I got it to call an internal method:

class Foo:
    variable = 0

    def test(self):
        self.variable = 'Hi'
        print(self.variable)

    def test2(self):
        Foo.test(self)

tmp = Foo()
tmp.test2()    
share|improve this answer

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