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Is it possible to reorder sql table rows?

I have about 8000 rows and they are kinda in a mess as dates are out of order compared to id, I know you can reset order by deleting and re-adding id (INT auto imp) but I want to re-order by date.

I know I could simply 'ORDER BY date' from the script but I would rather 'ORDER BY id' and have a nice clean DB ...

I'm guessing its an UPDATE ... query and have searched high and low for an answer but have yet to find it.

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If you have binary index on column date there is no matter you order it by id or by date - but you simply don't need to reorder –  SergeS Feb 17 '11 at 7:24
1  
Typically, in SQL database systems, you don't "order" and re-order tables physically. If you need an order, specify a ORDER BY in your SELECT query - that's all. –  marc_s Feb 17 '11 at 7:25
    
Yeah I know can simply 'ORDER BY date' in my SELECT query but I would rather have an organised DB and be able to 'ORDER BY id', i did say that in my first post ;) –  Dizzi Feb 17 '11 at 7:34
    
What database system and version? –  RichardTheKiwi Feb 17 '11 at 7:43
2  
To amplify marcs comment - tables don't have an order. Any order you perceive is incidental. The only place where an actual order is defined is when selecting the data (and only then, if you actually specify an order) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Feb 17 '11 at 8:00
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3 Answers

I disagree with your goal, but I think you could write a procedure such that:

  • selects all rows ordered by date, saving them in a recordset (using cursor)
  • removes all rows from the table
  • adds cyclically each row, exploiting an auto-incremental id
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I don't really agree with the goal, but.

In SQL Server 2005+, you can use this. Doing it in one go keeps table constraints, defaults etc intact while still obeying all foreign key hooks from other tables.

create table badlyordered( id int identity, date datetime, otherdata varchar(100))
insert badlyordered(date) select getdate()+4
insert badlyordered(date) select getdate()+2
insert badlyordered(date) select getdate()+3
insert badlyordered(date) select getdate()
insert badlyordered(date) select getdate()+10
insert badlyordered(date) select getdate()-10
update badlyordered set otherdata = date

select * from badlyordered order by id

id          date                    otherdata
----------- ----------------------- ---------------------
7           2011-02-21 18:51:55.087 Feb 21 2011  6:51PM
8           2011-02-19 18:51:55.087 Feb 19 2011  6:51PM
9           2011-02-20 18:51:55.087 Feb 20 2011  6:51PM
10          2011-02-17 18:51:55.087 Feb 17 2011  6:51PM
11          2011-02-27 18:51:55.087 Feb 27 2011  6:51PM
12          2011-02-07 18:51:55.087 Feb  7 2011  6:51PM

;with tmp as (
select *,
table_seq = row_number() over (order by id),
nice_seq = row_number() over (order by date, id)
from badlyordered
)
update t1
set date = t2.date
   ,otherdata = t2.otherdata
   -- and any other columns in the table
from tmp t1
inner join tmp t2 on t1.table_seq=t2.nice_seq

select * from badlyordered order by id

id          date                    otherdata
----------- ----------------------- ---------------------
7           2011-02-07 18:51:55.087 Feb  7 2011  6:51PM
8           2011-02-17 18:51:55.087 Feb 17 2011  6:51PM
9           2011-02-19 18:51:55.087 Feb 19 2011  6:51PM
10          2011-02-20 18:51:55.087 Feb 20 2011  6:51PM
11          2011-02-21 18:51:55.087 Feb 21 2011  6:51PM
12          2011-02-27 18:51:55.087 Feb 27 2011  6:51PM

But I know you're using MySQL. You can do the same by row-numbering twice in MySQL using variables, then using the row numbers to perform the update.

This produces the same data as the CTE in SQL Server.

select ..(rownumber variable by date).. from
(
select ..(rownumber variable by id).. from tbl order by id
) n

You then need 2(!) of them

select n.id, o.id
from
(

select ..(rownumber variable by date).. from
(
select ..(rownumber variable by id).. from tbl order by id
) n

inner join

select ..(rownumber variable by date).. from
(
select ..(rownumber variable by id).. from tbl order by id
) n

on ....
) o

To produce the map of update ids from original to target. The finally, you need to use an UPDATE FROM JOIN MySQL technique to join the table to this set of IDs to perform the update.

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What is the id used for? You seem to not have a problem with changing the ID, but if it referenced elsewhere that will be a problem. If it isn't referenced elsewhere then you might want to rethink your database design as the column can probably go away.

If you still want to do this, could you create a new table with an identity column and insert the row data without the id column, drop the old table and rename the new table using the old table's name.

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