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Background

I have been now using Entity Framework + Linq for about year and I haven't had a single case that where SQL sentences would have been -required-. Of course there might have been things that skilled SQL writer could do faster, but I'm looking things that are impossible or very difficult do with ORM's.

Question

My question (to fulfill my curiosity) is that what kind operations/situations ORM's in general cannot handle?

I have only little knowledge about databases, but isn't it so that if you would like delete all the content from one table then at least in Entity Framework you would have to loop items that you want delete.

Thank you for your information

Summary It seems that performance and vendor specific commands are being the reason why ORM cannot be used (out-of-the-box)

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

I have yet to encounter an ORM that can do the kind of things you can do with Oracle's analytic queries. (Which became part of the SQL 2003 standard, and are finding their way into other databases.) See http://www.orafaq.com/node/55 for an introduction to analytic queries.

There are also subtleties around left joins that I typically don't see exposed in ORMs, but I don't know Linq, and it might have them. For example compare

SELECT ...
FROM foo
  LEFT JOIN bar
    ON bar.bar_id = foo.bar_id
      AND bar.category_id = 5
  LEFT JOIN baz
    ON baz.baz_id = bar.bar_id
  ;

with

SELECT ...
FROM foo
  LEFT JOIN bar
    ON bar.bar_id = foo.bar_id
  LEFT JOIN baz
    ON baz.baz_id = bar.bar_id
      AND bar.category_id = 5
  ;

Can Linq express both queries properly?

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Excellent. That's a good answer. I have to admit that my little knowledge of SQL that I had is now almost completely lost. Maybe someone who knows both SQL and Linq could answer you. – Tx3 Feb 17 '11 at 8:59
    
Just because Linq can't do something, doesn't mean an ORM can't do it. Translating Linq into SQL is hard and imperfect. Non-Microsoft ORMs provide other query interfaces that are easier to convert to SQL (in addition to providing a Linq query interface). – Michael Maddox Feb 17 '11 at 11:13
    
@michael-maddox: Obviously it is possible for an ORM to expose any and all possible SQL functionality. My point was to bring up specific standard functionality that I have not seen ORMs support. My question about whether Linq handles this case is an honest one. I not worked with a predominantly MS technology stack in this millennium, and so have no familiarity with Linq. – btilly Feb 17 '11 at 15:26

Given a proper open source ORM, the ORM can likely be modified to generate whatever SQL you want it to in whatever scenario you want against any database vendor.

So, while no ORM out of the box likely has 100% coverage of what you can do with SQL (especially database vendor specific / non-standard SQL), there isn't really a technical reason why the ORM can't be modified to do so.

The feature releases of Entity Framework and Linq are not very agile so those are potentially slower to adapt to what ORM users want. That said, Linq (not LinqToSql) has been a great addition to the ORM world.

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I think this is a good point to emphasize the fact that users of the ORM's can extend functionaly +1 – Tx3 Feb 17 '11 at 11:40

In my experience, there are always situations in where it is better to write the SQL itself, instead of letting the ORM tool generate the SQL. I'd like to avoid that though, but in some cases, the ORM is not able to generate the most efficient SQL for some complex queries.

In fact, when I use native SQL instead of letting the ORM i use (NHibernate) do the work, it is mostly because of performance issues.
However, NHibernate does a really good job of generating the most performant SQL possible, so having to write the SQL myself, is really rare.

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