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Consider this piece of code:

 struct Trade
        {
         float Price;
             char* time;
             int shares;
             struct list_head *tradeList;
        };
typedef struct Trade Trade;

    void DisplayTrades(Trade* TBook)
        {
            if(TBook==NULL)
            {
                printf("NO TRADES\n");
                return;
            }
            struct list_head *pos;
            Trade *tmp;
            pos = TBook->tradeList;
            __list_for_each(pos,TBook->tradeList)
            {
                tmp = list_entry((pos),Trade,tradeList);
                printf("Price %f, Time %s, Shares %d\n",tmp->Price,tmp->time,tmp->shares);
            }

        }

In this code, when I compile, the compiler gcc returns a warning that initialization from incompatible pointer type in the line where list_entry is evoked. I have used list_entry in other places of the same code, and its working without any glitch. So the only thing that struck me was perhaps I passed unintended variable types to the function, hence attached the definition of structure Trade.The problem persists even then.

Would appreciate,to know where things are going wrong.

EDIT : This is just a small snippet from an otherwise large code. I apologise for making it look like, that I am trying to use Trade* object when none exists. In the code, I have indeed used typedef to define struct Trade;

share|improve this question
    
How are we supposed to know what's going on here when you don't include the definition of list_entry? Presumably it's a macro, since you're passing a type (Trade) to it. P.S. I would guess that it's supposed to be Trade*, not Trade, but I'm shooting in the dark without the definition. –  Jim Balter Feb 17 '11 at 11:38
    
list_entry() function is defined in list.h of LINUX KERNEL.List.h is a standard header file for Kernel Linked List. I can attach the code, if you insist –  Soham Feb 17 '11 at 13:13
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

For this to work, pos must be an actual list head pointer, but the structure field shoud be a list_head and not a list_head pointer :

struct Trade
        {
             float Price;
             char* time;
             int shares;
             struct list_head tradeList;
        };

And then :

  void DisplayTrades(Trade* TBook)
        {
            if(TBook==NULL)
            {
                printf("NO TRADES\n");
                return;
            }
            struct list_head *pos;
            Trade *tmp;
            __list_for_each(pos,&TBook->tradeList)
            {
                tmp = list_entry((pos),Trade,tradeList);
                printf("Price %f, Time %s, Shares %d\n",tmp->Price,tmp->time,tmp->shares);
            }

        }
share|improve this answer
    
Hmm precisely the thing I was afraid of. Thanks, yes I had the same hunch as well. –  Soham Feb 17 '11 at 19:40
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In DisplayTrades function while declaring the pointer of Trade structure as its argument you must use

struct Trade * Tbook.

share|improve this answer
    
To avoid this, always declare structs/unions with typedef. –  Lundin Feb 17 '11 at 9:57
    
@Algorithmist @Lundin Please take a look at my edit. I forgot to add it to the snippet, but the larger code base from where it is taken does contain a typedef of struct Trade Trade; (which is now added to the snippet) –  Soham Feb 17 '11 at 10:27
    
Or better yet, always use 'struct trade'. That avoids the namespace pollution that typedefs incur. –  user611775 Feb 17 '11 at 14:13
    
@Lundin Structure typedefs are frowned upon in Linux kernel code. This would be bad advice for anyone intending to share code upstream. –  Eric Seppanen Feb 17 '11 at 18:49
    
@user611775 There is no such thing as "namespace pollution". Professional programmers have variable/function/type naming in their coding standards, and use naming prefixes. –  Lundin Feb 18 '11 at 8:35
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