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I am wondering how would I convert the OpenCV C++ standard cv::Mat type to Qimage. I have been searching around, but have no luck. I have found some code that converts the IPlimage to Qimage, but that is not what I want. Thanks

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It will be useful if such code exists, but there are some issues in writing it: cv::Mat support more data types than QImage, cv::Mat supports multiple channels, should the data be copied or wrapped around the original data... –  Hristo Hristov Feb 17 '11 at 9:36
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8 Answers

Here is code for 24bit RGB and grayscale floating point. Easily adjustable for other types. It is as efficient as it gets.

QImage Mat2QImage(const cv::Mat3b &src) {
        QImage dest(src.cols, src.rows, QImage::Format_ARGB32);
        for (int y = 0; y < src.rows; ++y) {
                const cv::Vec3b *srcrow = src[y];
                QRgb *destrow = (QRgb*)dest.scanLine(y);
                for (int x = 0; x < src.cols; ++x) {
                        destrow[x] = qRgba(srcrow[x][2], srcrow[x][1], srcrow[x][0], 255);
                }
        }
        return dest;
}


QImage Mat2QImage(const cv::Mat_<double> &src)
{
        double scale = 255.0;
        QImage dest(src.cols, src.rows, QImage::Format_ARGB32);
        for (int y = 0; y < src.rows; ++y) {
                const double *srcrow = src[y];
                QRgb *destrow = (QRgb*)dest.scanLine(y);
                for (int x = 0; x < src.cols; ++x) {
                        unsigned int color = srcrow[x] * scale;
                        destrow[x] = qRgba(color, color, color, 255);
                }
        }
        return dest;
}
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This answered a question I was about to post about converting floating-point grayscale values into a QImage...thank you! –  Nathan Moos Feb 10 '12 at 19:17
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Michal Kottman's answer is valid and give expected result for some images but it'll fail on some cases. Here is a solution i found to that problem.

QImage imgIn= QImage((uchar*) img.data, img.cols, img.rows, img.step, QImage::Format_RGB888);

Difference is adding img.step part. qt won't complain without it but some images won't show properly without it. Hope this will help.

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This is essentially what OpenCV uses internally to convert (code.opencv.org/projects/opencv/repository/revisions/…, line 2389) image2Draw_qt = QImage(image2Draw_mat->data.ptr, image2Draw_mat->cols, image2Draw_mat->rows, image2Draw_mat->step, QImage::Format_RGB888); Also (approximately, line 2400) cvConvertImage(mat, image2Draw_mat, CV_CVTIMG_SWAP_RB); to convert from BGR to RGB. –  Nolan Sep 7 '12 at 18:50
    
img.step makes all the difference. I was having weird problems with this conversion, including having the resulting image show distorted and with the wrong colors. Testing a little bit I got the same code. –  MeloMCR Sep 19 '12 at 13:56
    
thanks! that was exactly what I was looking for! –  Dredok Nov 14 '13 at 12:28
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To convert from cv::Mat to QImage, you could try to use the QImage(uchar * data, int width, int height, Format format) constructor as follows (mat is a cv::Mat) :

QImage img((uchar*)mat.data, mat.cols, mat.rows, QImage::Format_RGB32);

It is more efficient than manually converting the pixels to the QImage, but you have to keep the original cv::Mat image in memory. It can be easily converted to a QPixmap and displayed using a QLabel:

QPixmap pixmap = QPixmap::fromImage(img);
myLabel.setPixmap(pixmap);

Update

Because OpenCV uses BGR order by default, you should first use cvtColor(src, dst, CV_BGR2RGB) to get an image layout that Qt understands.

Update 2:

If the image you are trying to show has nonstandard stride (when it is non-continuous, submatrix), the image may appeard distorted. In this case, it is better to explicitly specify the stride using cv::Mat::step1():

QImage img((uchar*)mat.data, mat.cols, mat.rows, mat.step1(), QImage::Format_RGB32);
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This will not work in the general case. What if mat has >1 channels or data format is not RGB32? –  Hristo Hristov Feb 18 '11 at 7:18
1  
Well, yes, and it can also have multiple dimensions, or can have different 'step size'. I am expecting that Hien wants to display 'standard' cv::Mat, i.e. loaded by imread, or converted to appropriate type. –  Michal Kottman Feb 18 '11 at 8:39
    
@Michael Yes that is what I wanted. I'll try out your code once I have time to work on my project. =) –  Hien Feb 20 '11 at 1:34
    
opencv uses the BGR channel order. –  etarion Feb 20 '11 at 12:51
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    Mat opencv_image = imread("fruits.jpg", CV_LOAD_IMAGE_COLOR); 
    Mat dest;
    cvtColor(opencv_image, dest,CV_BGR2RGB);
    QImage image((uchar*)dest.data, dest.cols, dest.rows,QImage::Format_RGB888);

This is what worked for me. I modified Michal Kottman's code above.

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cv::Mat has a conversion operator to IplImage, so if you have something that converts the IplImage to a QImage, just use that (or make the - probably minor - adjustments to take the cv::Mat directly, the memory layout is the same, it's "just" the header that is different.)

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The project that I am working on requires me to print out the image onto the QtGui, but I will be working on the images in cv::Mat most of the time. The reason I am asking is that my program will do a lot of computation so I want to get rid of the overhead of converting cv::Mat to IplImage and then to qimage. This is my first image processing project so I don't really know much about the data that are in an image. I will learn about this soon enough once I dive more into the project. Anyway, if I can't find anything, then I'll follow your suggestion =) –  Hien Feb 17 '11 at 10:46
    
Can you please share the code for IplImage -> QImage conversion? I am interested to make the needed adjustments to convert it to cv::Mat. –  Hristo Hristov Feb 17 '11 at 11:04
    
@Hien: The overhead of the conversion cv::Mat to IplImage is, compared to all the other stuff you do when doing image processing, completely negligible. There is no copying of data involved. –  etarion Feb 17 '11 at 11:57
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This post shows how to convert a QImage to OpenCV's IplImage and vise-versa.

After that, if you need help to convert between IplImage* to cv::Mat:

// Assume data is stored by: 
// IplImage* image;

cv::Mat mat(image, true); // Copies the data from image

cv::Mat mat(image, false); // Doesn't copy the data!

It's a hack, but will get the job done.

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Use the static function convert16uc1 for the depth image:

QPixmap Viewer::convert16uc1(const cv::Mat& source)
{
  quint16* pSource = (quint16*) source.data;
  int pixelCounts = source.cols * source.rows;

  QImage dest(source.cols, source.rows, QImage::Format_RGB32);

  char* pDest = (char*) dest.bits();

  for (int i = 0; i < pixelCounts; i++)
  {
    quint8 value = (quint8) ((*(pSource)) >> 8);
    *(pDest++) = value;  // B
    *(pDest++) = value;  // G
    *(pDest++) = value;  // R
    *(pDest++) = 0;      // Alpha
    pSource++;
  }

  return QPixmap::fromImage(dest);
}

QPixmap Viewer::convert8uc3(const cv::Mat& source)
{
  quint8* pSource = source.data;
  int pixelCounts = source.cols * source.rows;

  QImage dest(source.cols, source.rows, QImage::Format_RGB32);

  char* pDest = (char*) dest.bits();

  for (int i = 0; i < pixelCounts; i++)
  {
    *(pDest++) = *(pSource+2);    // B
    *(pDest++) = *(pSource+1);    // G
    *(pDest++) = *(pSource+0);    // R
    *(pDest++) = 0;               // Alpha
    pSource+=3;
  }

  return QPixmap::fromImage(dest);
}

QPixmap Viewer::convert16uc3(const cv::Mat& source)
{
  quint16* pSource = (quint16*) source.data;
  int pixelCounts = source.cols * source.rows;

  QImage dest(source.cols, source.rows, QImage::Format_RGB32);

  char* pDest = (char*) dest.bits();

  for (int i = 0; i < pixelCounts; i++)
  {
    *(pDest++) = *(pSource+2);    // B
    *(pDest++) = *(pSource+1);    // G
    *(pDest++) = *(pSource+0);    // R
    *(pDest++) = 0;               // Alpha
    pSource+=3;
  }

  return QPixmap::fromImage(dest);
}
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This did the trick for me. It's a little dodgy, but works with all color formats I have thrown at it so far, and it is also very simple to do.

The procedure is as follows:

cv::Mat image = //...some image you want to display

// 1. Save the cv::Mat to some temporary file
cv::imwrite("../Images/tmp.jpg",image);

// 2. Load the image you just saved as a QImage
QImage img;
img.load("../Images/tmp.jpg");

Done!

If you, say, want to display it in a QLabel, then continue with:

// Set QImage as content of MyImageQLabel
ui-> MyImageQLabel->setPixmap(QPixmap::fromImage(img, Qt::AutoColor));

I personally use this for a simple image editor.

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