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Is it possible to somehow refer to the value I am returning from a function? An example explains better:

CFTypeRef foo()
{
    CFTypeRef valueRef = NULL;
    bar(&valueRef); // fills valueRef with some data
    return valueRef;
}

I thought it would be nice to rewrite this as:

CFTypeRef foo()
{
    bar(&__retvalue);
}

Where of course __retvalue would be some magical token. Does this make sense? Is it possible to do that? If not, why?

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5  
Why would you want to? I don't understand what you would gain? –  GrahamS Feb 17 '11 at 9:30
    
In the example bar is not under my control and requires a pointer to CFTypeRef that it fills with some data. The purpose of foo is mainly to wrap the call to bar to make it easier to use. I found it weird to create a variable just to have a name for the value I want to return. –  zoul Feb 17 '11 at 9:45
1  
So the only advantage then, were it possible, would be for foo() to be shorter. It's already only three lines! –  jmtd Feb 17 '11 at 9:51
1  
Yes, it’s just a trifle. Hope that doesn’t disqualify the question :) –  zoul Feb 17 '11 at 9:55
1  
It's not a good idea to return non-primitive data types in C, because that leads to the compiler embedding memory copy within the generated code (the foo() will return the structure on the stack, from where the caller of foo() will copy it into whatever Lvalue it's being assigned to). Besides, you write CTypeRef myval = foo(), where you could CTypeRef myval; bar(&myval); so where's the point of the wrapper ? –  FrankH. Feb 17 '11 at 10:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

a) It makes sense. b) There is no such magic token. c) The "If not, why"? question is just bizarre ... Why isn't there such a magic token? Because the language designers never thought of it or, thinking of it, didn't think it was a good thing to add to the language. (Someone mentioned that the return value is usually held in a register but that's irrelevant; the compiler could generate code to load that register from an in-memory variable, exactly as happens in your current foo).

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1  
"just bizarre" - well, it's a question about how C was designed. Some languages have named return parameters. In VB you can return a value by assigning it to the name of the function prior to exit. It might be interesting to know which if the two possibilities you offer is correct - did this concept exist when C was designed? If so was it rejected out of hand as unnecessary syntactic sugar, or after careful consideration of certain non-obvious disadvantages? And so on. –  Steve Jessop Feb 17 '11 at 11:37
    
@Steve What I said was just bizarre was the question of why it wasn't provided. That's not a question about how C was designed, it's a question about why C wasn't designed some other way. –  Jim Balter Feb 17 '11 at 11:51
    
@Steve "did this concept exist when C was designed?" Yes, of course it did -- FORTRAN returns values that way. But that's not a "magic token", and FORTRAN doesn't provide both mechanisms, a return statement with a value and using the function name (at least, it didn't back when I wrote in FORTRAN). –  Jim Balter Feb 17 '11 at 11:56
    
The “bizzare question” simply wants to know the drawbacks that would speak against this feature. Judging by the feedback to my question, the answer is simply that nobody wants it. –  zoul Feb 17 '11 at 12:16
    
@zoul No one needs it and, in the form you gave, it's ugly and confusing. But note the above comments -- other languages allow this sort of thing by storing into a variable with the same name as the function. (That wouldn't work in C because the name of the function represents a valid value, and passing its address is a form of callback.) –  Jim Balter Feb 17 '11 at 12:43

This is not possible. At a low level, the return value is usually returned in a processor register, making it impossible to pass as a reference.

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Probably not.

Maybe you could define a macro if you're looking to make the code cleaner?

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It’s such a trifle that it’s not worth a macro. If there was a simple way to do it in plain C, I would happily get rid of the extra variable declaration. If not, it’s not a big deal. –  zoul Feb 17 '11 at 9:48

You could make bar() return its argument. You would save a line of code, if that's the point.

CFTypeRef foo()
{
    CFTypeRef valueRef = NULL;
    return bar(&valueRef);
}
share|improve this answer
    
bar is not under my control – sorry, should have mentioned that. –  zoul Feb 17 '11 at 9:47

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