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I'm struggling with this one. I have a table A which looks like this:

Employee_ID      Dependant_FirstName     DOB
1                John                    12/12/1980
1                Lisa                    11/11/1982
2                Mark                    06/06/1985
2                Shane                   07/07/1982
2                Mike                    03/04/1990
3                NULL                    NULL

and would like to copy these data in Table B like this (knowing that there could only be a maximum of 6 dependants in Table A):

Employee_ID  Dependant1_FirstName  DOB        Dependant2_FirstName DOB         Dependant3_FirstName  DOB   
1            John                  12/12/1980 Lisa                 11/11/1982  NULL                  NULL
2            Mark                  06/06/1985 Shane                07/07/1982  Mike                  03/04/1990
3            NULL                  NULL       NULL                 NULL        NULL                  NULL

Thanks very much for the help.

Marc

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1  
Is there any reason why Mark would be before Shane and why Shane would be before Mike? –  Lieven Keersmaekers Feb 17 '11 at 9:43
    
Is this a one-time thing? Can you add columns to table A? Because if table A had a Dependant_Counter field which went from 1-n for each employee, this would be fairly easy, if a tad longwinded. –  Matt Gibson Feb 17 '11 at 9:51

4 Answers 4

This is a working example for just your example data, to give an idea of how I'd do it. I'm using a faked-up dependant counter based on date of birth and name. Bear in mind it will break if an employee has twins with the same name, but if they do that, then they deserve all the lifelong data-confusion that they've got in store :)

Also, please consider upgrading that SQL Server. Or moving this kind of pivoting to your reporting tool rather than the database.

CREATE TABLE #employees (employee_id INTEGER, Dependant_FirstName VARCHAR(20), DOB DATETIME)

INSERT INTO #employees VALUES (1,                'John',                    '12/12/1980')
INSERT INTO #employees VALUES (1,                'Lisa',                    '11/11/1982')
INSERT INTO #employees VALUES (2,                'Shane',                   '07/07/1982')
INSERT INTO #employees VALUES (2,                'Mark',                    '06/06/1985')
INSERT INTO #employees VALUES (2,                'Mike',                    '03/04/1990')
INSERT INTO #employees VALUES (3,                NULL,                    NULL)

SELECT 
    employee_id, 
    MAX(CASE WHEN dep_count = 1 THEN Dependant_FirstName ELSE NULL END) 'Dependant1_FirstName',
    MAX(CASE WHEN dep_count = 1 THEN DOB ELSE NULL END) 'Dependant1_DOB',
    MAX(CASE WHEN dep_count = 2 THEN Dependant_FirstName ELSE NULL END) 'Dependant2_FirstName',
    MAX(CASE WHEN dep_count = 2 THEN DOB ELSE NULL END) 'Dependant2_DOB',
    MAX(CASE WHEN dep_count = 3 THEN Dependant_FirstName ELSE NULL END) 'Dependant3_FirstName',
    MAX(CASE WHEN dep_count = 3 THEN DOB ELSE NULL END) 'Dependant3_DOB'
FROM
    (
        SELECT 
            employee_id, 
            Dependant_FirstName, 
            DOB, 
            (
                SELECT 
                    COUNT(*) 
                FROM 
                    #employees deps 
                WHERE 
                    #employees.employee_id = deps.employee_id AND 
                    CONVERT(VARCHAR, #employees.DOB, 126) + #employees.Dependant_FirstName <= 
                        CONVERT(VARCHAR, deps.DOB, 126) + deps.Dependant_FirstName
            ) 'dep_count'
        FROM 
            #employees
    ) add_dep_count_query
GROUP BY 
    employee_id
share|improve this answer
    
+1 on the data-confusion joke and mentioning the fact this would better be dealth with by a reporting tool. –  Lieven Keersmaekers Feb 17 '11 at 10:19
    
+1 for the advice to upgrade away from the dead-end SQL Server 2000..... –  marc_s Feb 17 '11 at 10:40
    
Well, to be fair, a lot of people are still having to use SQL Server 2000 for the same reason that a lot of people are still having to use IE6 -- because someone else whom they have little or no influence over has made the decision for them, whether it's their head office IT department or a paying client they have to support. Often when I say these things I know I'm preaching to the converted, sadly... –  Matt Gibson Feb 17 '11 at 10:57
    
Thank you so much! It works like a charm. When I tried I was also woried about the twin scenario, but hopefully the parents know better not to give them the same names! Regarding SQL 2000, if the decision was mine, the server would have been updated a long time ago... ;). THANK YOU AGAIN FOR YOUR PROMPT SOLUTION!!! –  Marc Feb 17 '11 at 13:09

You could

  • Create a view
  • Calculate a fictuous ranking
  • Group to find the maximum ranking for each employee_ID
  • return the results.

Note: I have ommitted the DOB column in the examples

Statement

CREATE VIEW dbo.VIEW_Employees_Ranking AS 
  SELECT  Ranking = ISNULL(e6.Employee_ID, 0)
            + ISNULL(e5.Employee_ID, 0)
            + ISNULL(e4.Employee_ID, 0)
            + ISNULL(e3.Employee_ID, 0)
            + ISNULL(e2.Employee_ID, 0)
            + ISNULL(e1.Employee_ID, 0)          
          , e1.Employee_ID
          , Name1 = e1.Dependant_FirstName
          , Name2 = e2.Dependant_FirstName
          , Name3 = e3.Dependant_FirstName
          , Name4 = e4.Dependant_FirstName
          , Name5 = e5.Dependant_FirstName
          , Name6 = e6.Dependant_FirstName
  FROM    dbo.Employees e1
          LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.Employees e2 ON e2.Employee_ID = e1.Employee_ID AND e2.DOB > e1.DOB
          LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.Employees e3 ON e3.Employee_ID = e2.Employee_ID AND e3.DOB > e2.DOB
          LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.Employees e4 ON e4.Employee_ID = e3.Employee_ID AND e4.DOB > e3.DOB
          LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.Employees e5 ON e5.Employee_ID = e4.Employee_ID AND e5.DOB > e4.DOB
          LEFT OUTER JOIN dbo.Employees e6 ON e6.Employee_ID = e5.Employee_ID AND e6.DOB > e5.DOB
GO

SELECT  er.*
FROM    dbo.VIEW_Employees_Ranking er
        INNER JOIN (
          SELECT  Ranking = MAX(Ranking)
                  , Employee_ID
          FROM    dbo.VIEW_Employees_Ranking
          GROUP BY
                  Employee_ID
        ) ermax ON ermax.Ranking = er.Ranking AND ermax.Employee_ID = er.Employee_ID
share|improve this answer

Check this code please, It might work for you.

declare @Emp_Id int
declare @Name int
declare @DOB int
declare @Count int
set @Count=1
DECLARE x_cursor CURSOR FOR
SELECT distinct  Employee_ID from tableA
OPEN x_cursor
FETCH NEXT FROM x_cursor
INTO @Emp_Id
WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN


DECLARE second_cursor CURSOR FOR
SELECT distinct  Dependant_FirstName,DOB from tableA
where Employee_ID=@Emp_Id
OPEN second_cursor
FETCH NEXT FROM second_cursor
INTO @Name,@DOB

WHILE @@FETCH_STATUS = 0
BEGIN


if(@Count=1)
    begin 
        insert into tableB (Employee_ID , Dependant1_FirstName,DOB)
        values(@Emp_Id,@Name,@DOB)
        set @Count=@Count+1
    end
else
    begin
        exec('Update  tableB set  Dependant'+@count+'_FirstName='+@Name+' ,DOB'+@Count+'='+@DOB+'  where Employee_ID='+@Emp_Id)
        set @Count=@Count+1
    end

   FETCH NEXT FROM second_cursor
   INTO @Name,@DOB
END
CLOSE second_cursor
DEALLOCATE second_cursor


 set @Count=1
   FETCH NEXT FROM x_cursor
   INTO @Emp_Id

END
CLOSE x_cursor;
DEALLOCATE x_cursor
GO
share|improve this answer

Have a look at this example:

http://ryanfarley.com/blog/archive/2005/02/17/1712.aspx

here he is concatentating the child elements of a parent key into a string which should allow you to write out a flat record.

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