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I have to test and see if this method has shuffled a deck of cards. Here if the code for the actual shuffling part.

 public void randomShuffle () {
               for (int i = 0; i < DECK_SIZE; i++) {
                   int place = (int)((Math.random()*(51-i))+i);
                   Card temp = this.cardAt(i);
                   this.cardList[i] = this.cardAt(place);
                   this.cardList[place] = temp;
           }
       }

The problem with testing whether its been shuffled is that I could only switch two cards and it would be considered shuffled. Here is what i have so far for the test of the random shuffle.

static void randomShuffleTest () {
       Deck deck1 = Deck.newDeckOf52();
       Deck deck2 = Deck.newDeckOf52();
       deck2.randomShuffle();           

       assert false == deck1.equals(deck2);
    }

So, my question is, how do I test if something has been shuffled enough?

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As somebody said, you need a definition of 'enough'. You can calculate something like the entropy of the shuffle but i'd say it's easier to do what Jigar Joshi said and use Collections.shuffle(). –  Erik Feb 17 '11 at 10:17
2  
A fair shuffle (such as fisher-yates, which yours is an implementation of) will select all shufflings with equal probability. By trying to exclude 'less shuffled' results, you are actually reducing the randomness of the shuffle. –  Nick Johnson Mar 1 '11 at 2:14

6 Answers 6

You can't. It's impossible to determine if a deck is shuffled because in theory the shuffling could produce a deck that is exactly in order.

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would it be possible to compare the first card in a deck against another and add to a counter? then compare the first two cards of the deck to the next two card of the deck? so on and so forth. thus the higher the counter the more its been shuffled? –  frodosamoa Feb 17 '11 at 9:56
4  
@frodosamoa: Maybe this analogy will help you. Imagine you have a function that claims to return random integers uniformly between one and ten (inclusive). You want to test how random it is. You decide that if the result is one or ten then it's not random enough. Anything else is random enough. The problem is that this test rejects truly random functions 20% of the time, and it accepts functions that aren't random at all (e.g. "return 4;"). What you are doing is basically the same thing as this simple example, except you are picking 52 random numbers instead of just 1. –  Mark Byers Feb 17 '11 at 12:44

Exact test is not possible. Just trust your algorithm. or use Collections.shuffle()

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would it be possible to compare the first card in a deck against another and add to a counter? then compare the first two cards of the deck to the next two card of the deck? so on and so forth. thus the higher the counter the more its been shuffled? –  frodosamoa Feb 17 '11 at 9:54
    
again consider the worst case. you have shuffled and it got aligned to as it was before, you have shuffled (but not actually). you can modify your algo that will keep track of previous order and shuffle that much it doesn't align to previous state in any case –  Jigar Joshi Feb 17 '11 at 10:07

You cannot do this with a single sample. But what you might be able to do is to perform an statistical analysis of a number of shuffled decks to look for signs of non-randomness.

I think you might do better asking this on math.stackexchange.com ... where the brainy guys hang out. If they can explain "the math" in simple terms (for dumb IT folks like you and me), you should be able to code the tests in Java.

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And now there's a Statistics site as well that might be a little more focused towards what you're looking for: stats.stackexchange.com –  Gordon Gustafson Apr 14 '12 at 17:05

One measure might be to sort the shuffled deck and check how many 'operations' it took. Obviously this measure would depend on the sort algorithm.

Alternately, you might find some statistical measure somewhere here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Randomness_tests.

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First of I like this question(interesting).

  • First of I would like to know what is your definition off "shuffled enough?". Can you even measure it? Do you have guidlines for this? Should for example at least five cards but in a different spot? You could easily write a test to validate that a number of cards or in a different spot, but is this enough?
  • I also think Mark is right about producing a shuffled deck which mimics original deck(although I doubt the probability is very low). So testing that would be very hard or you could discard the shuffled deck if it mimics original. That way your test would suffice
  • Furthermore I believe you should probably use Jigar's mention of Collections.shuffle() instead of writing something yourself?
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Exactly as Mark Byers said, a shuffling algorithm may produce a deck that is exactly in order. But if it does so in every successive run, then definitely it's a bad algorithm! So a proper algorithm for shuffling should create sequences of cards such that the distribution of cards on the i-th position is uniform. Let S(i)={c(1)(i),c(2)(i),...,c(54)(i)} be the i-th sequence (the i-th outcome of your algorithm). Then c(j)(i) with respect to (i) should follow (approximately) the uniform distribution. To check if that holds, run your algorithm some thousands of times, and at each position j=1,2,...,54 count the frequency in which each different card appears. The numbers should be more or less equal. Ideally, if you run the algorithm 54000 times you should see each card at each position 1000 times. I strongly doubt whether this will be the case using Math.random(). Use java.util.Random for better results. This is how you work with Random:

final java.util.Random random = new java.util.Random(seed);

and each time you need a random double:

random.nextDouble();

The method Collections.shuffle(); does exactly that. If you need RNGs better than Java's Random implementation you should most probably proceed with your own implementation.

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1  
"I strongly doubt whether this will be the case using Math.random(). Use java.util.Random for better results" - nope, it's the same thing. Math.random() javadoc says: "When this method is first called, it creates a single new pseudorandom-number generator, exactly as if by the expression new java.util.Random" "If you need RNGs better than Java's Random implementation you should most probably proceed with your own implementation." - no, if you need RNGs better than that, you should use java.util.SecureRandom, which is almost certainly better than what a non-expert could implement. –  Cowan Feb 17 '11 at 10:19
    
That said, otherwise an excellent answer. Testing the distribution is the only real way to test this. –  Cowan Feb 17 '11 at 10:21
    
@Cowan: I agree that SecureRandom is a very good RNG but a (maybe) better is the linux's /dev/random that uses environmental noise collected from device drivers. –  Pantelis Sopasakis Feb 17 '11 at 10:28

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