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I have deployed a wcf service on two different machines. One is running windows server 2003 x86 and the other is x64. The x86 version works fine but on the x64 it just displays page not found when I navigate to the service in a browser.

The server is running IIS 6 and was set up the same as the x86 server.

Any ideas?

EDIT 1

Now I am getting

Exception Details: System.BadImageFormatException: Could not load file or assembly 'AgentService' or one of its dependencies. An attempt was made to load a program with an incorrect format.

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Hi, what does it happen if you set the app pool in the x64 bit box to work in 32 bit mode? –  Davide Piras Feb 17 '11 at 10:27
    
changing the property didnt change much. But after some more fiddling around I got a service error message. I'll edit the question –  Marcom Feb 17 '11 at 10:43
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Marcom are you using any third party assembly which was built only for 32 bits? Because the BadImageFormatException is exactly telling you that AgentService cannot be loaded due to architecture differences. –  Davide Piras Feb 17 '11 at 10:46
    
It is possible. I am trying to enable Assembly binding logging to find the culprit. –  Marcom Feb 17 '11 at 10:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I would look like one of your dependent assemblies is built only for 32bit.

In that case you would need to force IIS (assuming thats whats hosting your service) to run in 32bit mode - see this msdn page for how to do that

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yup that was it. I recompiled everything to any cpu. And found out that the sqlite DLL was x86 only, so i added the x64 and everything worked smoothly. Enabling 32bit on IIS broke the whole thing. –  Marcom Feb 17 '11 at 12:23

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