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I'm trying to convert a string to a double, but since I'm working on a Windows native application (as in linking only to ntdll.dll), I don't have most of the standard library available. I can use basic FP support in math.h, but that's basically it.

How do I convert a string to the double closest to the rational number expressed in that string?

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You could search for the source of "strtod" and copy them. Be aware of the license! (strtod is the function that converts strings to doubles in C). I looked at a version, and it doesn't seem to be very difficult to write. –  xanatos Feb 20 '11 at 20:01
    
@xanatos, I did look at the glibc sources before asking the question; however, the algorithm involves multiple-precision arithmetic (and is of course hard to decipher without reading the paper---if any---it is based on). –  avakar Feb 21 '11 at 8:18
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

If you really want to get the nearest, the problem is quite hard and you need arbitrary precision arithmetic to achieve that result. See ftp://ftp.ccs.neu.edu/pub/people/will/howtoread.ps for instance.

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Thanks! So it seems that I can't do it without also bringing arbitrary-precision arithmetic on board. –  avakar Feb 17 '11 at 12:24
    
lipforge.ens-lyon.fr/projects/crlibm could be of help for you. –  AProgrammer Feb 17 '11 at 15:18
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Have you seen Open NT Native Template Library, particularly the STLx part? Basically, you get something close to normal C++ runtime in Native or Kernel code.

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Assuming the JSON grammar (link currently down, Google cached version here) is acceptable to you, the following comes more or less direct from internally developed code for JSON parsing, being a literal implementation of its syntax diagram:

/*

    defined functions for handling the input:

        nextChar() - peeks at the next character of input

        getAndRemoveCharacter() - returns the next character of input and
        dequeues it

    This code also assumes you have BOOL, YES and NO defined; I've left this in
    for clarity
*/

double getNumber()
{
    // determine whether the number is negative - it'll start with a '-' if so
    BOOL negative = NO;
    if(nextChar() == '-')
    {
        negative = YES;
        getAndRemoveCharacter();
    }

    // seed the output number to 0
    double number = 0.0;

    // if the next character isn't a '0' then this is the number proper, so
    // just pull off the digits and assemble the number; otherwise this number
    // is either 0 itself (in which case the initial seed is correct) or a
    // decimal starting in 0
    if(nextChar() != '0')
    {
        while(nextChar() >= '0' && nextChar() <= '9')
        {
            number *= 10.0;
            number += getAndRemoveCharacter() - '0';
        }
    }
    else
        getAndRemoveCharacter();

    // if this is a decimal then jump on to the decimal part and deserialise
    // digits, much as above
    if(nextChar() == '.')
    {
        getAndRemoveCharacter();
        double decimalMultiplier = 1.0;
        while(nextChar() >= '0' && nextChar() <= '9')
        {
            decimalMultiplier /= 10.0;
            number += (double)(getAndRemoveCharacter() - '0') * decimalMultiplier;
        }
    }

    // if this number has an exponent then deal with that
    if(nextChar() == 'e' || nextChar() == 'E')
    {
        getAndRemoveCharacter();

        double exponent = 0.0;
        BOOL exponentPositive = YES;

        // JSON allows positive exponents to start with + (unlike
        // the mantissa) and requires negative exponents to start with -
        if(nextChar() == '+')
        {
            getAndRemoveCharacter();
        }
        else
            if(nextChar() == '-')
            {
                exponentPositive = NO;
                getAndRemoveCharacter();
            }

        // read out digits and assemble exponent
        while(nextChar() >= '0' && nextChar() <= '9')
        {
            exponent *= 10.0;
            exponent += getAndRemoveCharacter() - '0';
        }

        // apply exponent
        number *= pow(10.0, exponentPositive ? exponent : -exponent);
    }

    // negate if necessary and return
    return negative ? -number : number;
}

Any character type that puts the ASCII letters in the normal ASCII range will work, so it should work equally on ASCII and variants, and unicode. I guess you'd probably want to just take a string directly as an argument rather than do all those calls out; they're their in the original because the input stream is coming from afar, so they may block.

The only math.h function used in 'pow', everything else is just primitive operations.

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That solution is good is you don't want to take the "closest" requirement too seriously. If you do, see the link I provided. –  AProgrammer Feb 17 '11 at 12:21
    
Agreed; I took the context supplied by the "I don't have most of the standard library available" question to modify the "closest" such as to be just an explicit clue that incoming numbers aren't in any way formatter according to the precision and range of doubles. The code given is likely to be as good as atof, for example, and I understood the task to be supplying what the standard C library ordinarily would. –  Tommy Feb 17 '11 at 12:59
    
@Tommy, I'm pretty sure that some standard library implementations are using multiple precision arithmetic to gives a precise result. –  AProgrammer Feb 17 '11 at 15:17
1  
The C standard requirement on floating point constants, which is inherited by strtod() and atof(), is "the result is either the nearest representable value, or the larger or smaller representable value immediately adjacent to the nearest representable value, chosen in an implementation-defined manner". I believe a perfectly conforming strtod() has historically been one of the trickiest parts of the C standard to implement. –  caf Feb 17 '11 at 23:50
1  
Precisely — from which it follows that it is permissible for strtod to return a value that is only next to the closest — not necessarily the closest. –  Tommy Feb 18 '11 at 0:53
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