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I'm looking for the recommended/nicest way to make Selenium tests execute in several browsers one after another. The website I'm testing isn't big, so I don't need a parallel solution yet.

I have the usual test set-up methods with [SetUp], [TearDown], and [Test]. The SetUp one, of course, instantiates a new ISelenium object with whatever browser I want to test with.

So what I want to do is programmatically say: this test will be run on Chrome, IE, and Firefox in sequence. How do I do that?

EDIT:

This might help a bit. We're using CruiseControl.NET to start the NUnit tests after a successful build. Is there any way to pass a parameter to the NUnit executable, and then use that parameter in the test? This way we could have NUnit run several times with different browser parameters.

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8 Answers 8

up vote 31 down vote accepted

NUnit 2.5+ now supports Generic Test Fixtures which make testing in multiple browsers very straightforward. http://www.nunit.org/index.php?p=testFixture&r=2.5

Running the following example will execute the GoogleTest twice, once in Firefox and once in IE.

using NUnit.Framework;
using OpenQA.Selenium;
using OpenQA.Selenium.Firefox;
using OpenQA.Selenium.IE;
using System.Threading;

namespace SeleniumTests 
{
    [TestFixture(typeof(FirefoxDriver))]
    [TestFixture(typeof(InternetExplorerDriver))]
    public class TestWithMultipleBrowsers<TWebDriver> where TWebDriver : IWebDriver, new()
    {
        private IWebDriver driver;

        [SetUp]
        public void CreateDriver () {
            this.driver = new TWebDriver();
        }

        [Test]
        public void GoogleTest() {
            driver.Navigate().GoToUrl("http://www.google.com/");
            IWebElement query = driver.FindElement(By.Name("q"));
            query.SendKeys("Bread" + Keys.Enter);

            Thread.Sleep(2000);

            Assert.AreEqual("bread - Google Search", driver.Title);
            driver.Quit();
        }
    }
}
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this is the best answer –  Dinis Cruz Jan 10 '13 at 17:10

This is a recurring question and is solved a couple ways:

  1. Factory method produces your ISelenium object - You have a helper class with a static getSelenium method. That method reads in some external config, which has a property that defines the browser you want as a string. In your getSelenium you then configure the browser accordingly. here's a handy post on using config files with NUnit http://blog.coryfoy.com/2005/08/nunit-app-config-files-its-all-about-the-nunit-file/

  2. Others have success with injecting the browser via an IoC container. I really like this because TestNG works really well with Guice in Java land, but I'm not sure how easy it is to mix NUnit and Ninject, MEF, etc...

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I have the helper stuff and configurable browser string, but the problem is that I have to run the same test multiple times with different browsers. –  Edgar Feb 21 '11 at 8:22
    
Then you should be swapping the config files for each run. The whole config file would be the same, but you'd have the browser name as a string for each browser you'd want to test. –  pnewhook Feb 22 '11 at 15:08

I use a list of IWeb driver to perform tests on all browsers, line by line:

[ClassInitialize]
        public static void ClassInitialize(TestContext context) {
            drivers = new List<IWebDriver>();
            firefoxDriver = new FirefoxDriver();
            chromeDriver = new ChromeDriver(path);
            ieDriver = new InternetExplorerDriver(path);
            drivers.Add(firefoxDriver);
            drivers.Add(chromeDriver);
            drivers.Add(ieDriver);
            baseURL = "http://localhost:4444/";
        }

    [ClassCleanup]
    public static void ClassCleanup() {
        drivers.ForEach(x => x.Quit());
    }

..and then am able to write tests like this:

[TestMethod]
        public void LinkClick() {
            WaitForElementByLinkText("Link");
            drivers.ForEach(x => x.FindElement(By.LinkText("Link")).Click());
            AssertIsAllTrue(x => x.PageSource.Contains("test link")); 
        }

..where I am writing my own methods WaitForElementByLinkText and AssertIsAllTrue to perform the operation for each driver, and where anything fails, to output a message helping me to identify which browser(s) may have failed:

 public void WaitForElementByLinkText(string linkText) {
            List<string> failedBrowsers = new List<string>();
            foreach (IWebDriver driver in drivers) {
                try {
                    WebDriverWait wait = new WebDriverWait(clock, driver, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(5), TimeSpan.FromMilliseconds(250));
                    wait.Until((d) => { return d.FindElement(By.LinkText(linkText)).Displayed; });
                } catch (TimeoutException) {
                    failedBrowsers.Add(driver.GetType().Name + " Link text: " + linkText);
                }
            }
            Assert.IsTrue(failedBrowsers.Count == 0, "Failed browsers: " + string.Join(", ", failedBrowsers));
        }

The IEDriver is painfully slow but this will have 3 of the main browsers running tests 'side by side'

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This is basically just an expansion of alanning's answer (Oct 21 '11 at 20:20). My case was similar, just that I did not want to run with the parameterless constructor (and thus use the default path to the driver executables). I had a separate folder containing the drivers I wanted to test against, and this seems to work out nicely:

[TestFixture(typeof(ChromeDriver))]
[TestFixture(typeof(InternetExplorerDriver))]
public class BrowserTests<TWebDriver> where TWebDriver : IWebDriver, new()
{
    private IWebDriver _webDriver;

    [SetUp]
    public void SetUp()
    {
        string driversPath = Environment.CurrentDirectory + @"\..\..\..\WebDrivers\";

        _webDriver = Activator.CreateInstance(typeof (TWebDriver), new object[] { driversPath }) as IWebDriver;
    }

    [TearDown]
    public void TearDown()
    {
        _webDriver.Dispose(); // Actively dispose it, doesn't seem to do so itself
    }

    [Test]
    public void Tests()
    {
        //TestCode
    }
}

}

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+1 Brilliant - this is much neater and you only need to decorate your class with the different drivers. –  Deano Nov 4 '13 at 11:41

Ok, one solution is to have wrapper tests that set-up the ISelenium object with different browsers. Then they pass that object to all the other tests which use it instead of setting up a new one themselves like they did previously.

The disadvantage is, I end up with one big test for each browser. Not the best solution either. Still looking...

EDIT:

Spent some more time on this. The solution I came up with is to have a text file in the solution that specifies the browser to use for testing. NUnit picks up the setting when instantiating a Selenium object.

I'm using CruiseControl.NET to run automatic builds and tests. And instead of just running the test once, I configured it to run them twice. But before each test I run a command line command that changes the browser in the configuration text file.

<exec>
    <executable>cmd</executable>
    <buildArgs>/C echo firefox C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Mozilla Firefox\\firefox.exe > F:\...\selenium_browser.txt</buildArgs>
</exec>
<exec>
    <executable>F:\...\NUnit 2.5.7\bin\net-2.0\nunit-console.exe</executable>
    <baseDirectory>F:\...\bin\Debug</baseDirectory>
    <buildArgs>F:\...\...nunit /xml:"F:\CCXmlLog\Project\nunit-results.xml" /noshadow</buildArgs>
    <successExitCodes>0</successExitCodes>
    <buildTimeoutSeconds>1200</buildTimeoutSeconds>
</exec>

<exec>
    <executable>cmd</executable>
    <buildArgs>/C echo googlechrome C:\\Program Files (x86)\\Google\\Chrome\\Application\\chrome.exe > F:\...\selenium_browser.txt</buildArgs>
</exec>
<exec>
    <executable>F:\...\NUnit 2.5.7\bin\net-2.0\nunit-console.exe</executable>
    <baseDirectory>F:\...\bin\Debug</baseDirectory>
    <buildArgs>F:\...\...nunit /xml:"F:\CCXmlLog\Project\nunit-results.xml" /noshadow</buildArgs>
    <successExitCodes>0</successExitCodes>
    <buildTimeoutSeconds>1200</buildTimeoutSeconds>
</exec>
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It turns out you can also specify environment variables with the <exec> element, so that would be a way to avoid the text files. –  Edgar Jun 2 '11 at 16:11

This helped me to solve similar problem How do I run a set of nUnit tests with two different setups?

Just set different browsers in setup method : ]

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I was wondering about the same issue and finally i got solution

So when you install plugin you then are able to controll in which browser should scenario be tested.

Feature example:

@Browser:IE
@Browser:Chrome
Scenario Outline: Add Two Numbers
    Given I navigated to /
    And I have entered <SummandOne> into summandOne calculator
    And I have entered <SummandTwo> into summandTwo calculator
    When I press add
    Then the result should be <Result> on the screen
    Scenarios:
        | SummandOne | SummandTwo | Result |
        | 50 | 70 | 120 |
        | 1 | 10 | 11 |

Implementation

[Given(@"I have entered '(.*)' into the commentbox")]
public void GivenIHaveEnteredIntoTheCommentbox(string p0)
{
            Browser.Current.FindElement(By.Id("comments")).SendKeys(p0);
}

More info

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@Dukeling fixed –  Volodymyr Bilyachat Mar 11 at 8:33

There must be a better way, but you could use T4 templates to generate duplicate test classes for each browser - essentially automating a copy-and-paste of the tests for each browser.

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Yeah, there must be a better way. –  Edgar Feb 17 '11 at 12:44

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