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I am wondering about the following C#-code:

struct Structure
{
    public Structure(int a, int b)
    {
        PropertyA = a;
        PropertyB = b;
    }
    public int PropertyA { get; set; }
    public int PropertyB { get; set; }
}

It is not compiling with an error "The 'this' object cannot be used before all of its fields are assigned to". For the analogous class it is compiling without any problems.

It can be made working by refactoring to the following:

struct Structure
{
    private int _propertyA;
    private int _propertyB;

    public Structure(int a, int b)
    {
        _propertyA = a;
        _propertyB = b;
    }

    public int PropertyA
    {
        get { return _propertyA; }
        set { _propertyA = value; }
    }

    public int PropertyB
    {
        get { return _propertyB; }
        set { _propertyB = value; }
    }
}

But, I though that the whole point of introducing auto-properties to the C# was to avoid writing later code. Does that mean that auto-properties are not relevant for the structs?

share|improve this question
    
What version of .Net are you using? –  Thom Wiggers Feb 17 '11 at 13:00
8  
Every time you write a mutable struct, someone cries –  Marc Gravell Feb 17 '11 at 13:00
    
@TheGuyOfDoom - it won't matter... the behaviour will be the same on any; this is a C# 3.0 compiler feature, and the "fix" is as per Stefan –  Marc Gravell Feb 17 '11 at 13:01
    
possible duplicate of Automatic Properties and Structures Don't Mix? –  nawfal Jun 3 '13 at 18:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 9 down vote accepted

While Stefan has the answer than addresses the question, I have to advise you not to use a mutable struct - it will bite you. Mutable structs are evil.

IMO, the "correct" fix here is simply:

struct Structure
{
    public Structure(int a, int b)
    {
        propertyA = a;
        propertyB = b;
    }
    private readonly int propertyA, propertyB;
    public int PropertyA { get { return propertyA; } }
    public int PropertyB { get { return propertyB; } }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
I'd just use PropertyA { get; private set; }. Readonly gains you very little – it's almost always trivial to avoid setting your properties more than once. And if you don't use readonly, you're still using automatically implemented properties, so the problem is still relevant. –  Joren Feb 17 '11 at 13:06
2  
@Joren - it expresses our intent ;) and avoids the annoyance of having to call :this() –  Marc Gravell Feb 17 '11 at 15:49

You need to call the default constructor first, like so:

struct Structure
{
    public Structure(int a, int b) : this()
    {
        PropertyA = a;
        PropertyB = b;
    }
    public int PropertyA { get; set; }
    public int PropertyB { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer

As you've seen, when referring to PropertyA in your constructor, you're accessing the this object, which the compiler won't allow because your fields haven't been initialized yet.

To get around this, you need to find a way to initialize the fields. One way is your example: If you don't use auto-properties, then the fields are explicit and you can initialize them.

Another way is to have your constructor call another constructor that initializes the fields. Structs always implicitly have a parameterless constructor that initializes its fields to zero, so use that:

public Structure(int a, int b)
    : this()
{
    PropertyA = a;
    PropertyB = b;
}
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