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I know that ID is a faster selector than class in Javascript. But what if I cache the selector? When the selector is cached, would it differ in speed if it’s a class selector, or will it be as fast as the id selector?

Example:

<div class=”myclass”></div>
<div id=”myid”></div>

var $myclass = $('.myclass');
var $myid = $('#myid');

Will $myid be faster than than $myclass?

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I'm not sure your example is quite right. What are you trying to do here - your second line will return nothing? –  Paddy Feb 17 '11 at 13:06
    
I think your code sample is wrong. You reference #myid but you do not have a tag with an id attribute. You are setting both by class. –  Mr. Manager Feb 17 '11 at 13:06
    
Those are weird quotes. They're definitely not legal HTML; use regular " quotes instead of those things. –  rvighne Jun 3 at 4:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have those stored in variables. So the speed will be the same for both.

The performance hit will occur when you are iterating DOM to get elements. At that time ID selector will be faster than class selector.

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Thanks rahul! Good to know! –  Hakan Feb 17 '11 at 13:24

Just to make sure I'm not missing the mark... I think you mean

<div class="myclass"></div>
<div id="myid"></div>

and then in jquery your doing:

var $myclass = $('.myclass');
var $myid = $('#myid');

My understanding of jquery is that when creating the vars creating the $myclass is not as fast as creating the $myid... but when you go back to use them later. they will be the same speed.

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Have a look at this tips

http://www.tvidesign.co.uk/blog/improve-your-jquery-25-excellent-tips.aspx?sms_ss=favorites

Above link suggest to Use IDs instead of classes wherever possible

Description here:

jQuery makes selecting DOM elements using classes as easy as selecting elements by ID used to be, so it's tempting to use classes much more liberally than before. It's still much better to select by ID though because jQuery uses the browser's native method (getElementByID) to do this and doesn't have to do any of it's own DOM traversal, which is much faster. How much faster? Let's find out.

I'll use the previous example and adapt it so each LI we create has a unique class added to it. Then I'll loop through and select each one once.

// Create our list
var myList = $('.myList');
var myListItems = '<ul>';

for (i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    myListItems += '<li class="listItem' + i + '">This is a list item</li>';
}

myListItems += '</ul>';
myList.html(myListItems);

// Select each item once
for (i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    var selectedItem = $('.listItem' + i);
}

Just as I thought my browser had hung, it finished, in 5066 milliseconds (over 5 seconds). So i modified the code to give each item an ID instead of a class and then selected them using the ID.

// Create our list
var myList = $('.myList');
var myListItems = '<ul>';

for (i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    myListItems += '<li id="listItem' + i + '">This is a list item</li>';
}

myListItems += '</ul>';
myList.html(myListItems);

// Select each item once
for (i = 0; i < 1000; i++) {
    var selectedItem = $('#listItem' + i);
}

This time it only took 61 milliseconds. Nearly 100x faster.

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The cached reference to a DOM node is always the fastest possible way. So once you have a reference stored, it makes no difference how it did get there.

The bridge example

Imagine there is a bridge between your Javascript world and the DOM world. Each time you want to access an element (a "citizen") from Javascript in the DOM world, you need to cross that bridge.. but that is not for free.. you need to pay a pretty expensive toll.
So you should only go that way once and therefore only pay once.

If you know the exact position of the element (which is stored in a variable) you can just access it in no time.

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Very good example, @jAndy –  rahul Feb 18 '11 at 3:48

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