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I am trying to understand C, by going through K&R. I have trouble understanding this code for two functions found in the book:

void qsort(int v[], int left, int right){
int i, last;

void swap(int v[], int i, int j);

if (left >= right)
    return;

swap(v, left, (left+right)/2);

last = left;

for ( i = left+1; i<=right; i++)
    if (v[i]<v[left])
        swap(v,++last, i);

swap(v,left,last);
qsort(v,left,last-1);
qsort(v,last+1,right);
}


void swap(int v[], int i, int j){

    int temp;

    temp = v[i];
    v[i] = v[j];
    v[j] = temp;
}

These two function perform a quicksort on a given array. In the main function I created an int array and called qsort. It compiled fine and ran fine. My question is, why is the prototype for swap() put in the function qsort() and not before main()?

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It can be done both ways. I suppose this is done to put the prototype in a scope, not that it matters. –  Stefan Dragnev Feb 17 '11 at 13:48
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3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The prototype should be added before the actual function is used for first time. In this case, I do not think its a general practice to have prototype in qsort() function, however, it still serves the purpose. The prototype for swap() could also be added before main() too, don't think it will make a difference.

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This is incorrect. The prototype for swap() could not be added in main(), as it must be declared before it's used in qsort(). It is a strange place to put the prototype, but the only other place it could be legally put would be before swap(). –  Bradley Swain Feb 17 '11 at 14:54
    
@Bradley - Edited my answer. –  Sachin Shanbhag Feb 17 '11 at 14:57
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You write a function prototype so that the compiler knows that function exists, and can use it. swap() is used inside qsort(), so it must appear before the line it is used. In this case, the swap() prototype is declared inside the qsort() function, but it could as well be declared before the function itself. Or you could define swap() before qsort() and remove the prototype.

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When you call function there is no need to write void before function. You just call like this

swap(arguments whatever you pass to it)

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The void you mention actually refers to the prototype of the function, not the function call itself. Nowhere in the code is there a call with void prepended... –  Ioannis Karadimas Feb 17 '11 at 14:00
    
The code is verbatim from K&R. –  Caveman Feb 17 '11 at 14:06
    
@JJG: Yes, but the line void swap(int v[], int i, int j); is not a call. –  Keith Thompson Jan 5 at 2:51
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