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id|pnumber|special|limitedtime|normal
1 |765234 |1      |0          |0
2 |765235 |0      |1          |0
3 |776234 |0      |0          |1
4 |776235 |1      |0          |0
5 |785456 |0      |1          |0
6 |785457 |1      |0          |0

Here is another scenario of a problem I had posted previously.

Please note I am in fact using dbi and placeholders but, using just the basics for my question.

Instead of three queries:

SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `special` > 1
ORDER BY ABS(pnumber) DESC 
LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar2

execute and display

SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `limitedtime` > 1
ORDER BY ABS(pnumber) DESC 
LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar2

execute and display

SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `normal` > 1
ORDER BY ABS(pnumber) DESC 
LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar2

execute and display

Which gives my results but, the LIMIT needs to be tied to all three /dependent.

So, I want to do something like:

SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
ORDER BY special?? ABS(pnumber) DESC,
ORDER BY limitedtime?? ABS(pnumber) DESC,
ORDER BY normal?? ABS(pnumber) DESC
LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar2

Which, I think if done correctly, will give me my results in the order I desire.

765234 (special)
776235 (special)
785457 (special)
765235 (limitedtime)
785456 (limitedtime)
776234 (normal)

I use the LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar2 for pagination / navigation.

(The table has much more data results are actually being pushed into arrays because there is some cross referencing / querying to other tables going on later down the code.)

Sure is a big question in which someone may answer with a simple here ya' go!

Thanks for helping this noob everyone.

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3 Answers

You could just use union all to combine the output of the queries

SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `special` > 1
ORDER BY ABS(pnumber) DESC 
LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar2

UNION ALL

SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `limitedtime` > 1
ORDER BY ABS(pnumber) DESC 
LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar

UNION ALL

SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `normal` > 1
ORDER BY ABS(pnumber) DESC 
LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar

Union All essentially takes the outputs of the queries and concatenates them.

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I will try now and get back to you. Look promising. I will do some reading on UNION ALL. Thank you for pointing me there. I will choose your answer if this works for me. –  Stephie Feb 17 '11 at 14:56
    
@Dodger pointed out an important issue, the where clauses need to have > 0 instead of > 1. –  The Dog Feb 17 '11 at 19:26
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You can use the union operator to join the three selects, then do the order and limit.

SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `special` > 1
union
SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `limitedtime` > 1
union
SELECT `pnumber` from `table`
WHERE `normal` > 1
ORDER BY ABS(pnumber) DESC 
LIMIT $Lvar1,$Lvar2
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That won't give the same effect as the 3 queries he is running now. It will change the order that the data is displayed because it will order only by pnumber, the poster needs to be ordered by subcategory then by pnumber. –  The Dog Feb 17 '11 at 14:36
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I'm seeing some inconsistencies with your example data. You're looking for things with special, limitedtime, or normal that have values > 1, but your example dataset only has values of 1. You'll never get any results from this dataset at all because nothing will ever match the WHERE clause.

Also, you are specifying ORDER BY clauses with DESC, but in the example you want to see as the results, you show them sorted with pnumber ascending.

I'm going to make two assumptions here:

1) You actually want them where the values are > 0, not > 1 (if you only need a nonzero value, the query gets simpler, but since you've specifically used ABS() I'm assuming the real data you're working with can negative values).

2) You actually meant ASC, not DESC, since the output you were asking for is in that order.

So using the data you've specified above, the following query will work:

  SELECT pnumber,
         CONCAT('(',
                CONCAT_WS(', ',
                          IF(special > 0, 'special', NULL),
                          IF(limitedtime > 0, 'limited time', NULL),
                          IF(normal > 0, 'normal', NULL)),
                ')') AS type_desc,
         IF(special > 0, 3, 0) + IF(limitedtime > 0, 2, 0) + IF(normal > 0, 1, 0) AS disp_priority
    FROM ex_table
   WHERE ((special > 0) + (limitedtime > 0) + (normal > 0)) > 0
ORDER BY disp_priority DESC,
         ABS(pnumber) ASC

No UNION necessary. Also note that a UNION may not give you what you're looking for anyway: If you use one of the UNION examples shown above, then in the case that both special > 0 AND limitedtime > 0 you'd get a duplicate output row, as it would match more than one of the UNION-ed queries.

The query below outputs the following, in the MySQL monitor:

+---------+----------------+---------------+
| pnumber | type_desc      | disp_priority |
+---------+----------------+---------------+
|  765234 | (special)      |             3 | 
|  776235 | (special)      |             3 | 
|  785457 | (special)      |             3 | 
|  765235 | (limited time) |             2 | 
|  785456 | (limited time) |             2 | 
|  776234 | (normal)       |             1 | 
+---------+----------------+---------------+
6 rows in set (0.23 sec)

And, except for the extra output column, that's exactly what you asked for it to do.

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Oh, forgot about the LIMIT clause... just tack that on the end. –  Dodger Feb 17 '11 at 17:12
    
Oh, BTW: that whole CONCAT...CONCAT_WS..AS type_desc line is just to actually output the special/limited/normal concatenated together in parens like you showed. Since you're doing this in the DBI, you can just put those three columns in the selection and check them for truthiness in Perl to determine what to show there. –  Dodger Feb 17 '11 at 17:20
    
OK, guys... explain something to me here. Stephie asked for a query that would not use three separate queries. I posted an answer that does not use three separate queries. Two other people posted answers that use UNIONs. Anyone who knows how MySQL works knows that a UNION IS THREE SEPARATE QUERIES, just concatenated together before output. So riddle me this: Why is my answer which actually answers what was asked being ignored and the two answers which do not get voted up? Reality is not subject to the whims of democracy. Stephie: My answer is correct. The UNION operator uses multiple queries. –  Dodger Feb 18 '11 at 18:18
    
I'm not sure why you consider a query using unions to be separate queries? Because the word "select" is used more than once? In my solution above there is one execute and one list of results that can then be sorted and paginated. I see that as one "query", even if multiple selects are involved. I saw The fact that the results are segregated by type in the question to be an accident of doing three separate queries, not an essential requirement. Perhaps that is wrong, that is up to the OP to decide. –  Bill Ruppert Feb 20 '11 at 4:12
    
As far as ignored vs. voted up, your answer was a bit late in arriving, and the question aged out. I saw it only because I'm following this thread. Personally, I did not vote it up because it seems overly complex and not obviously correct (or incorrect). –  Bill Ruppert Feb 20 '11 at 4:14
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