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I have an object writen like this:

Object1.prototype = {
    isInit: false,
    Get : function (){}
} 

Now I'd like to add a constructor which takes one parameter. How can I do it?

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up vote 50 down vote accepted

Class declaration

var User = function(name, age) { // constructor
}

User.prototype = {}

Instance variables (members)

var User = function(name, age) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

User.prototype = {}

Static variables

var User = function(name, age) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

User.prototype = {
    staticVar: 15,
    anotherStaticVar: 'text'
}

Here i defined two static variables. Each User instance has access to this two variables. Note, that we can initialize it with value;

Instance functions (methods)

var User = function(name, age) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

User.prototype = {
    getName: function() {
        return this.name;
    },

    setName: function(name) {
        this.name = name;
    }
}

Usage example:

var user = new User('Mike', 29);
user.setName('John');
alert(user.getName()); //should be 'John'

Static functions

var User = function(name, age) {
    this.name = name;
    this.age = age;
}

User.create = function(name, age) {
    return new User(name, age);
}

User.prototype = {}
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2  
That is not incorrect, but using a function expression with a name like that has various different problems in the various JavaScript interpreters and is probably (sadly) best avoided. Here is an article from kangax on the subject. – Pointy Feb 17 '11 at 15:22
    
+1 But it is not really a class. JavaScript has no concept of classes. – Felix Kling Feb 17 '11 at 15:50
1  
@Felix: I agree with you about javascript classes conceprt, it just i call it 'class'. – Andrew Orsich Feb 17 '11 at 21:13

Assuming that by "ctor" you mean "constructor", in JavaScript that's just a function. In this case your constructor would need to be "Object1" itself - in other words, what you've got there makes sense if you have already defined "Object1" to be a function.

Thus,

function Object1(param) {
  // constructor code
}

would be the constructor for your type.

Now there are some JavaScript libraries that provide a utility layer for defining classes. With those, you generally pass some sort of object (like you've got) that includes an "init" function. The libraries provide APIs for creating "classes" and for extending one class from another.

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Javascript has prototype based object model. Check this mozilla wiki page and suddenly you'll feel much better in js land.

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class CLASS_NAME
{
   private:
         int variable;
   public:
          CLASS_NAME()    //constructor
          {
                 variable = 0;
          }
};
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3  
Muhammad welcome to SO. one line answers typically don't get to much attention around here. you could improve this answer by explaining what value it has for someone who is trying to figure out how to define a javascript constructor – Semicolons and Duct Tape May 15 at 19:34
1  
Can you edit your proposed answer to expand on what this does and how it addresses the OP? – Ro Yo Mi May 16 at 0:48
    
Dear I have given the basic example of constructor. – Muhammad Rehan May 17 at 13:43

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