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I have the following code in a java Web Service:

public boolean makeFile(String fileName, String audio)
    {
        if (makeUserFolder())
        {
            File file = new File(getUserFolderPath() + fileName + amr);
            FileOutputStream fileOutputStream = null;
            try
            {

                file.createNewFile();
                fileOutputStream = new FileOutputStream(file);
                fileOutputStream.write(Base64.decode(audio));

                return true;

            }
            catch(FileNotFoundException ex)
            {
                return false;
            }
            catch(IOException ex)
            {
                return false;
            }
            finally{
                try {
                    fileOutputStream.close();
                    convertFile(fileName);
                } catch (IOException ex) {
                    Logger.getLogger(FileUtils.class.getName()).log(Level.SEVERE, null, ex);
            }
}

        }
        else
            return false;

    }

    public boolean convertFile(String fileName)
    {
        Process ffmpeg;
        String filePath = this.userFolderPath + fileName;
        try {
            ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("ffmpeg","-i",filePath + amr,filePath + mp3);
            pb.redirectErrorStream();
            ffmpeg = pb.start();
        } catch (IOException ex) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

It used to work and now it simply won't execute the ffmpeg conversion for some reason. I thought it was a problem with my file but after running the command from terminal no errors are thrown or anything, thought it was maybe permissions issue but all the permissions have been granted in the folder I'm saving the files. I noticed that the input BufferedReader ins being set to null after running the process, any idea what's happening?

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

First of all, a small nitpick with your code...when you create the FileOutputStream you create it using a string rather than a File, when you have already created the File before, so you might as well recycle that rather than force the FileOutputStream to instantiate the File itself.

Another small nitpick is the fact that when you are writing out the audio file, you should enclose that in a try block and close the output stream in a finally block. If you are allowed to add a new library to your project, you might use Guava which has a method Files.write(byte[],File), which will take care of all the dirty resource management for you.

The only thing that I can see that looks like a definite bug is the fact that you are ignoring the error stream of ffmpeg. If you are blocking waiting for input on the stdout of ffmpeg, then it will not work.

The easiest way to take care of this bug is to use ProcessBuilder instead of Runtime.

ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("ffmpeg","-i",filePath+amr,filePath+mp3);
pb.redirectErrorStream(); // This will make both stdout and stderr be redirected to process.getInputStream();
ffmpeg = pb.start();

If you start it this way, then your current code will be able to read both input streams fully. It is possible that the stderr was hiding some error that you were not able to see due to not reading it.

If that was not your problem, I would recommend using absolute paths with ffmpeg...in other words:

String lastdot = file.getName().lastIndexOf('.');
File mp3file = new File(file.getParentFile(),file.getName().substring(0,lastdot)+".mp3");
ProcessBuilder pb = new ProcessBuilder("ffmpeg","-i",file.getAbsolutePath(),mp3file.getAbsolutePath());
// ...

If that doesn't work, I would change ffmpeg to be an absolute path as well (in order to rule out path issues).

Edit: Further suggestions.

I would personally refactor the writing code into its own method, so that you can use it elsewhere necessary. In other other words:

public static boolean write(byte[] content, File to) {
    FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(to);
    try {
        fos.write(content);
    } catch (IOException io) {
        // logging code here
        return false;
    } finally {
        closeQuietly(fos);
    }
    return true;
}
public static void closeQuietly(Closeable toClose) {
    if ( toClose == null ) { return; }
    try {
        toClose.close();
    } catch (IOException e) {
        // logging code here
    } 
}

The reason that I made the closeQuietly(Closeable) method is due to the fact that if you do not close it in that way, there is a possibility that an exception will be thrown by the close() method, and that exception will obscure the exception that was thrown originally. If you put these in a utility class (although looking at your code, I assume that the class that it is currently in is named FileUtils), then you will be able to use them throughout your application whenever you need to deal with file output.

This will allow you to rewrite the block as:

File file = new File(getUserFolderPath() + fileName + amr);
file.createNewFile()
write(Base64.decode(audio),file);
convertFile(fileName);

I don't know whether or not you should do this, however if you want to be sure that the ffmpeg process has completed, then you should say ffmpeg.waitFor(); to be sure that it has completed. If you do that, then you should examine ffmpeg.exitValue(); to make sure that it completed successfully.

Another thing that you might want to do is once it has completed, write what it output to a log file so you have a record of what happened, just in case something happens.

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Thank you, currently i'm home so i'll have to test this code tomorrow. The thing is the code you see above was working last week, and today when I went to do another test because I made some changes (not in this part of the code) it failed and would not convert the audio file, thought it was a permissions issue but doing the command from the terminal worked. I'll get back to you with the results –  8vius Feb 18 '11 at 2:00
    
Thanks it worked :D i changed the code to the new one if you have any more suggestions i'd appreciate them –  8vius Feb 18 '11 at 15:02
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