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I have a base class for data access classes. This class implements IDisposable. This base class contains the IDbConnection and instantiates it in the constructor.

public class DALBase : IDisposable
{
    protected IDbConnection cn;
    public DALBase()
    {
        cn = new MySqlConnection(connString);
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (cn != null)
        {
            if (cn.State != ConnectionState.Closed)
            {
                try
                {
                    cn.Close();
                }
                catch
                {
                }
            }
            cn.Dispose();
        }
    }
}

Classes that inherit from this class actually access the database:

public class FooDAL : DALBase
{
    public int CreateFoo()
    {
        // Notice that the cmd here is not wrapped in a using or try-finally.
        IDbCommand cmd = CreateCommand("create foo with sql", cn);
        Open();
        int ident = int.Parse(cmd.ExecuteScalar().ToString());
        Close();
        cmd.Dispose();
        return ident;
    }
}

Classes that use FooDAL use the using pattern to ensure that Dispose gets called on the FooDAL with code like this:

using(FooDAL dal = new FooDAL())
{
    return dal.CreateFoo();
}

My question is, does this also ensure that the IDbCommand is disposed of properly even though it's not wrapped in a using pattern or try-finally? What happens if an exception occurs during the execution of the command?

Also, would it be better to instantiate the connection in CreateFoo instead of in the constructor of the base class for performance reasons?

Any help is appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Given that the connections are pooled, just create the MySqlConnection in the CreateFOO method (with a using block).

Don't bother about closing it, as it will be disposed/closed automatically at the end of the using block.

public int CreateFoo()
{
    using (var cn = new MySqlConnection(connString))
    {
        // Notice that the cmd here is not wrapped in a using or try-finally.
        using (IDbCommand cmd = CreateCommand("create foo with sql", cn))
        {
            cn.Open();
            return int.Parse(cmd.ExecuteScalar().ToString());
        }
     }
}
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On a side note, if you have a class that has an IDisposable field, then this class should also be IDisposable (see: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182172%28v=vs.80%29.aspx) –  yorah Feb 17 '11 at 16:19

If this is all in the interest of efficiency, the biggest change you can make to speed up your code is to avoid opening and closing the db connection object on each DbCommand.

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Connections are pooled in .Net, so when you call Open(), you are only effectively opening the connection the first time you pool one. The cost of "opening" the connection is not mattering in terms of performance (most of the time). –  yorah Feb 17 '11 at 16:02
    
Except that you call Close(), which I assume is closing the db connection. You can avoid this by checking the ConnectionState of the DbConnection –  steinberg Feb 17 '11 at 16:06
    
Connections are released back into the pool when you call Close or Dispose on the Connection. (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8xx3tyca%28v=VS.100%29.aspx) => this is valid from .Net 1.1 –  yorah Feb 17 '11 at 16:11
    
I'm actually worried that the IDbCommand is not being disposed properly in the case of an exception. –  Brett Bim Feb 17 '11 at 16:52
    
@Brett Bim: don't be worried. A class that is IDisposable will be garbaged collected at some point in time if there is no reference to it. If you want to be totally sure, use the IDbCommand in a using() { ... } block => it is the same as a try .. finally { }, so it will always be disposed in the finally block, even in the case of an exception. –  yorah Feb 18 '11 at 10:40

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