Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Please see the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

enum dataType {
    DATATYPE_BYTE,
    DATATYPE_CHAR, 
    DATATYPE_UCHAR,
    DATATYPE_SHORT,
    DATATYPE_USHORT,
    DATATYPE_INT,
    DATATYPE_UINT,
    DATATYPE_LONG,
    DATATYPE_ULONG,
    DATATYPE_FLOAT,
    DATATYPE_UFLOAT,
    DATATYPE_DOUBLE,
    DATATYPE_UDOUBLE,

    DATATYPE_BLOB,
    DATATYPE_STRING,
    DATATYPE_COMPLEX, 

    DATATYPE_MORE, 
    DATATYPE_ERROR
};

typedef struct typenamepair_ {
    const dataType name;
    const char* const nameval ;
} typenamepair;

class types {
    private:
        typenamepair *typesArr;
        static typenamepair TYPES[];
        static types* instance_;
    public:
        static types* getInstance() {
            if ( !instance_ )
                instance_ = new types;

            return instance_;
        }
        const char* operator[](dataType typeEnum)
        {
            for ( unsigned int i = 0; i < (sizeof(types::TYPES)/sizeof(typenamepair)); ++i ) {
                if ( i == TYPES[i].name  )
                    return TYPES[i].nameval;
            }
            // failed to get value. return error
            return TYPES[DATATYPE_ERROR].nameval;
        }
};

types* types::instance_ = NULL;
typenamepair types::TYPES[] = {
    { DATATYPE_BYTE, "byte" },
    { DATATYPE_CHAR, "char" },
    { DATATYPE_UCHAR, "u_char" },
    { DATATYPE_SHORT, "short" },
    { DATATYPE_USHORT, "u_short" },
    { DATATYPE_INT, "int" },
    { DATATYPE_UINT, "u_int" },
    { DATATYPE_FLOAT, "float"},
    { DATATYPE_UFLOAT, "u_float"},
    { DATATYPE_DOUBLE, "double"},
    { DATATYPE_UDOUBLE, "u_double"},
    { DATATYPE_STRING, "cstring"},
    { DATATYPE_BLOB, "blob"},
    { DATATYPE_COMPLEX, "complex"},
    { DATATYPE_MORE, "more"},

    // Unknown type!
    { DATATYPE_ERROR, "ERROR"}
};


main()
{
    const char* test = (types::getInstance())[DATATYPE_UINT] ;
    cout << test << endl;
}

Gives me the following compilation errors:

test.cpp: In member function 'const char* types::operator': test.cpp:53: error: invalid application of 'sizeof' to incomplete type 'typenamepair []' test.cpp: In function 'int main()': test.cpp:87: error: cannot convert 'types' to 'const char*' in initialization

What is wrong with size of and how can I fix it? Also, how can I use the returned instace to use the operator to get the typename?

Also, please let me know if there is a better solution. Thanks

share|improve this question
    
1. singleton is irrelevant to your problem. simplifying your example would help us help you 2. you can use dataType as an index of your array so you won't need to iterate it – Andy T Feb 17 '11 at 16:28
    
Unfortunately, cannot use the datatype as index as it needs to be defined in accordance with API specs. Will make sure to remove non-relevant code next time. Thanks. What is the alternative if not singleton? – Kiran Feb 17 '11 at 18:19
up vote 0 down vote accepted

For your first error, you need to move the code using sizeof until after the array contents have been defined. There is a better way to get the array size but it also can't be used until the contents are defined.

For your second error, you have a pointer, so your user-defined operator[] isn't being found. Change getInstance to return a reference instead of a pointer and it should work.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you pls explain how to use .nameval? – Kiran Feb 17 '11 at 16:14
    
@Kiran: Sorry, I didn't see that you were trying to redefine operator[]. The problem is that your user defined operator[] exists for types and not types*... operator[] on a pointer always means array access and cannot be redefined. Replace the pointer with a reference and everything should be ok. – Ben Voigt Feb 17 '11 at 16:19
    
If you dont mind, can you explain me the significance of (&) in this solution? template <typename T, std::size_t N> std::size_t size(T (&)[N]) { return N; } – Kiran Feb 17 '11 at 18:31
    
@Kiran, it means a reference. T& would be a reference to a single T object, and T (&)[N] is a reference to an array of N T objects. – Ben Voigt Feb 17 '11 at 19:28

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.