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Is there a command line based way to send pings to each computer in a subnet? Like

for(int i = 1; i < 254; i++)
    ping(192.168.1.i);

to enforce arp resolution?

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9 Answers 9

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This is a modification of the accepted answer above, which runs all the pings in parallel (much faster) and only shows the output for ip addresses which return the ping.

export COUNTER=1
while [ $COUNTER -lt 255 ]
do
    ping $1$COUNTER -c 1 -w 400 | grep -B 1 "Lost = 0" &
    COUNTER=$(( $COUNTER + 1 ))
done
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Not all machines have nmap available, but it's a wonderful tool for any network discovery, and certainly better than iterating through independent ping commands.

$ nmap -n -sP 10.0.0.0/24

Starting Nmap 4.20 ( http://insecure.org ) at 2009-02-02 07:41 CST
Host 10.0.0.1 appears to be up.
Host 10.0.0.10 appears to be up.
Host 10.0.0.104 appears to be up.
Host 10.0.0.124 appears to be up.
Host 10.0.0.125 appears to be up.
Host 10.0.0.129 appears to be up.
Nmap finished: 256 IP addresses (6 hosts up) scanned in 2.365 seconds
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Best answer to date because it is the first to be compatible with the reality that not all subnets are the same size, and using the /24 notation can be generalized to any size subnet. –  Liudvikas Bukys Feb 2 '09 at 14:03
    
This is the better answer than the excepted one because it is more flexible, and adjusts to different networks. –  Sam Jul 14 at 16:19

Broadcast ping:

$ ping 192.168.1.255
PING 192.168.1.255 (192.168.1.255): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 192.168.1.154: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=0.104 ms
64 bytes from 192.168.1.51: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=2.058 ms (DUP!)
64 bytes from 192.168.1.151: icmp_seq=0 ttl=64 time=2.135 ms (DUP!)
...

(Add a -b option on Linux)

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1  
note: you may need to add a "-b" in there depending on version/platform –  Mark Renouf Feb 2 '09 at 13:21
    
Also, not all operating systems will respond to a broadcast ping (by default). –  Mark Renouf Feb 2 '09 at 13:22
    
In IPv6 use "ff02::1". –  Keltia Feb 2 '09 at 13:34

In Bash shell:

#!/bin/sh

COUNTER=1

while [ $COUNTER -lt 254 ]
do
   ping 192.168.1.$COUNTER -c 1
   COUNTER=$(( $COUNTER + 1 ))
done
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1  
you might want to add a "-c 1" option to the ping command there... –  Henrik Paul Feb 2 '09 at 13:26

The command line utility nmap can do this too:

nmap -sP 192.168.1.*

(IIRC)

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Check if this blog post has what you need.

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Under linux, I think ping -b 192.168.1.255 will work (192.168.1.255 is the broadcast address for 192.168.1.*) however IIRC that doesn't work under windows.

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FOR /L %i in (1,1,254) DO PING 192.168.1.%i -n 1 -w 100 | for /f "tokens=3 delims=: " %j in ('find /i "TTL="') do echo %j>>IPsOnline.txt
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#!/bin/sh

COUNTER=$1

while [ $COUNTER -lt 254 ]
do
 echo $COUNTER
 ping -c 1 192.168.1.$COUNTER | grep 'ms'
 COUNTER=$(( $COUNTER + 1 ))
done

#specify start number like this: ./ping.sh 1
#then run another few instances to cover more ground
#aka one at 1, another at 100, another at 200
#this just finds addresses quicker. will only print ttl info when an address resolves
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