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If I have the text in a shell variable, say $a:

a="The cat sat on the mat"

How can I search for "cat" and return 4 using a Linux shell script, or -1 if not found?

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possible duplicate of String contains in bash – Daniel DiPaolo Feb 17 '11 at 16:39
3  
@Daniel This question asks for an index of substring too – Nikita Rybak Feb 17 '11 at 16:41

With bash

a="The cat sat on the mat"
b=cat
strindex() { 
  x="${1%%$2*}"
  [[ $x = $1 ]] && echo -1 || echo ${#x}
}
strindex "$a" "$b"   # prints 4
strindex "$a" foo    # prints -1
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3  
+1 It also works in Dash, ash, ksh, pdksh, zsh. Dash and ash want [ "$x" = "$1" ] and pdksh wants x=$2; x="${1%%$x*}", however. – Dennis Williamson Feb 17 '11 at 20:22
1  
doesnt work on redhat bash 2.0 – Zubair Mar 17 '11 at 12:07
4  
@Zubair, bash 2.0 is 10 years old and 2 major releases behind (ftp.gnu.org/gnu/bash). Can you update it? – glenn jackman Mar 17 '11 at 13:47

You can use grep to get the byte-offset of the matching part of a string:

echo $str | grep -b -o str

As per your example:

[user@host ~]$ echo "The cat sat on the mat" | grep -b -o cat
4:cat

you can pipe that to awk if you just want the first part

echo $str | grep -b -o str | awk 'BEGIN {FS=":"}{print $1}'
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3  
cut -d: -f1 is a bit more lightweight than piping through awk – glenn jackman Feb 17 '11 at 17:54
1  
echo "The cat sat on the mat" | grep -b -o mat doesn't work – Zubair Mar 17 '11 at 11:16
    
@Zubair: define "doesn't work"- the output is correct on my machine. – Cercerilla Mar 17 '11 at 13:49
6  
outputs '0:cat' on my mac – commonpike Nov 20 '13 at 14:34
    
Gives '0:cat' on Mac and Ubuntu. – tommy.carstensen Apr 13 '15 at 21:37

I used awk for this

a="The cat sat on the mat"
test="cat"
awk -v a="$a" -v b="$test" 'BEGIN{print index(a,b)}'
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This does not work for large strings (10k +) – Zubair Mar 17 '11 at 11:14
    
awk gives +1 too great answer considering what the original poster requested. Howerer, there is a way to correct it: awk -v a="$a" -v b="$test" 'BEGIN{print index(a,b)}' | xargs expr -1 + – jarno Apr 1 '15 at 14:50
    
Thanks this helped me allot! – Patrick Leijser Apr 8 '15 at 21:36
echo $a | grep -bo cat | sed 's/:.*$//'
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Only echo "$a" worked when I tried this – Zubair Feb 17 '11 at 16:46
    
echo "The cat" | grep -bo cat | sed 's/:.*$//' doesnt work – Zubair Mar 17 '11 at 11:17
1  
@Zubair - your command displays "4" on my Ubuntu 10.04 box. That's what I expect. – qbert220 Mar 17 '11 at 11:26

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