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Thanks for your help

Here's the finished code for IE, Firefox, Safari and Chrome: http://jsbin.com/eyoda4


I created a simple CSS UL drop down menu, so when a user hovers over the designated link, a menu will drop down for the user to select an option.

The issue I'm having is I'd like the content to wrap around the UL menu so the UL appears seamless/flush within the content without breaks in content.

This is a demo of the issue and my code. As you can see the content doesn't wrap around the UL.
DEMO: http://jsbin.com/uzidu4/

This demo is a visual of how I'd like the content to wrap around the menu.
Note: This example won't work, because no UL is present in this example - This is just a visual
Demo: http://jsbin.com/uzidu4/2/

Thank you for your help!

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

(answering only your update here)

To make it work in IE7, you can add this:

<!--[if IE 7]>
<style>
.inline-list, ul.program-menu li {
  display: inline;
  zoom: 1
}
</style>
<![endif]-->

I also recommend adding this to stop the annoying text jump when you hover over the drop down:

ul.program-menu li {
    position : relative;
    border-top: 1px solid #fff;
    border-left: 1px solid #fff;
    border-right: 1px solid #fff
}

(I tried transparent, but it screwed up the menu slightly in IE7)

http://jsbin.com/uzidu4/21

share|improve this answer
1  
Thanks for the IE fix and resolving text jump issue. This looks like real winner. Thanks again! I fixed the text jump in the sub menus here: jsbin.com/eyoda4 – Evan Feb 17 '11 at 20:19
    
@Evan: Good work, looks fine to me. – thirtydot Feb 17 '11 at 21:06

Second example doesn't work for me, but what you need to do is make your menu and menu elements relatively positioned so that when the sub menus show, they are not removed from the flow of the document.

share|improve this answer

This is quite the dilemma.

You want your menu to be inline. So, the solution would seem to be to declare display: inline on your menu node. However, since the node contains block-level nodes, this is invalid.

As I see it, your best solution would be to have two separate elements: one for your menu "trigger", and one for your menu items:

<ul id="menu1" class="menu-items">
    <li>Item 1</li>
    <li>Item 2</li>
    <li>Item 3</li>
</ul>
<p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Quisque convallis libero sit amet nisi pellentesque dapibus. <span id="menu1-trigger" class="menu-trigger">Menu</span> Etiam iaculis, erat sit amet adipiscing venenatis</p>

.menu-items would then be positioned absolutely, with #menu1 having coordinates such that it appears under your #menu1-trigger.

This is probably best done with javascript, as you can't reliably predict screen resolution or font size, and thus you can't predict the actual position of any given inline element.

Do note that the content will not wrap around the menu items, the menu items will be overlaid on the content. It was unclear as to whether this is what you wanted.

share|improve this answer
    
is there something in jquery that can do the work? I thought something like wrapInner() could do it, but I'm not sure. api.jquery.com/wrapInner – Evan Feb 17 '11 at 19:04
    
jQuery can set up an event handler, which then gets passed an event object. `$('#menu1-trigger').click(function(e) { // get trigger coords from the event object (e), position #menu1 at those coords, plus whatever offset you need }); – Ryan Kinal Feb 17 '11 at 19:10
    
I have the issue solved, but it doesn't seem to render properly for IE7. jsbin.com/ahipe3 I have it working fine for Safari, Chrome and FireFox. Is there a position/inline style issue with IE? – Evan Feb 17 '11 at 19:50
    
you can change the display of any element to whatever you want. making a ul have display: inline is not invalid, although making the ul a child of a p element is invalid. Either don't use a p element (div > ul), or don't use a ul (p > span > span). – zzzzBov Feb 17 '11 at 20:02

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