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I'm trying to implement a WPF application using MVVM (Model-View-ViewModel) pattern and I'd like to have the View part in a separate assembly (an EXE) from the Model and ViewModel parts (a DLL).

The twist here is to keep the Model/ViewModel assembly clear of any WPF dependency. The reason for this is I'd like to reuse it from executables with different (non-WPF) UI techs, for example WinForms or GTK# under Mono.

By default, this can't be done, because ViewModel exposes one or more ICommands. But the ICommand type is defined in the System.Windows.Input namespace, which belongs to the WPF!

So, is there a way to satisfy the WPF binding mechanism without using ICommand?

Thanks!

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2  
@aoven: I'm where you were when you asked this 8 months ago, and wondering what you wound up doing and how well it worked it out for you. Cheers –  Berryl Oct 6 '09 at 16:08
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8 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You should be able to define a single WPF custom routed command in your wpf layer and a single command handler class. All your WPF classes can bind to this one command with appropriate parameters.

The handler class can then translate the command to your own custom command interface that you define yourself in your ViewModel layer and is independent of WPF.

The simplest example would be a wrapper to a void delegate with an Execute method.

All you different GUI layers simply need to translate from their native command types to your custom command types in one location.

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can you give an example? –  Jose May 29 '09 at 15:21
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please see below for example –  Dave Jellison Mar 3 '11 at 1:18
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WinForms doesn't have the rich data binding and commands infrastructure needed to use a MVVM style view model.

Just like you can't reuse a web application MVC controllers in a client application (at least not without creating mountains of wrappers and adapters that in the end just make it harder to write and debug code without providing any value to the customer) you can't reuse a WPF MVVM in a WinForms application.

I haven't used GTK# on a real project so I have no idea what it can or can't do but I suspect MVVM isn't the optimal approach for GTK# anyway.

Try to move as much of the behavior of the application into the model, have a view model that only exposes data from the model and calls into the model based on commands with no logic in the view model.

Then for WinForms just remove the view model and call the model from the UI directly, or create another intermediate layer that is based on WinForms more limited data binding support.

Repeat for GTK# or write MVC controllers and views to give the model a web front-end.

Don't try to force one technology into a usage pattern that is optimized for another, don't write your own commands infrastructure from scratch (I've done it before, not my most productive choice), use the best tools for each technology.

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Instead of the VM exposing commands, just expose methods. Then use attached behaviors to bind events to the methods, or if you need a command, use an ICommand that can delegate to these methods and create the command through attached behaviors.

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Off course this is possible. You can create just another level of abstraction. Add you own IMyCommand interface similar or same as ICommand and use that.

Take a look at my current MVVM solution that solves most of the issues you mentioned yet its completely abstracted from platform specific things and can be reused. Also i used no code-behind only binding with DelegateCommands that implement ICommand. Dialog is basically a View - a separate control that has its own ViewModel and it is shown from the ViewModel of the main screen but triggered from the UI via DelagateCommand binding.

See full Silverlight 4 solution here Modal dialogs with MVVM and Silverlight 4

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Answer demonstrating this approach here –  Neutrino Nov 5 '13 at 17:48
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I needed an example of this so I wrote one using various techniques.

I had a few design goals in mind

1 - keep it simple

2 - absolutely no code-behind in the view (Window class)

3 - demonstrate a dependency of only the System reference in the ViewModel class library.

4 - keep the business logic in the ViewModel and route directly to the appropriate methods without writing a bunch of "stub" methods.

Here's the code...

App.xaml (no StartupUri is the only thing worth noting)

<Application 
    x:Class="WpfApplicationCleanSeparation.App" 
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" 
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml">
</Application>

App.xaml.cs (load up the main view)

using System.Windows;
using WpfApplicationCleanSeparation.ViewModels;

namespace WpfApplicationCleanSeparation
{
    public partial class App
    {
        protected override void OnStartup(StartupEventArgs e)
        {
            var view = new MainView();
            var viewModel = new MainViewModel();

            view.InitializeComponent();
            view.DataContext = viewModel;
            CommandRouter.WireMainView(view, viewModel);
            view.Show();
        }
    }
}

CommandRouter.cs (the magic)

using System.Windows.Input;
using WpfApplicationCleanSeparation.ViewModels;

namespace WpfApplicationCleanSeparation
{
    public static class CommandRouter
    {
        static CommandRouter()
        {
            IncrementCounter = new RoutedCommand();
            DecrementCounter = new RoutedCommand();
        }

        public static RoutedCommand IncrementCounter { get; private set; }
        public static RoutedCommand DecrementCounter { get; private set; }

        public static void WireMainView(MainView view, MainViewModel viewModel)
        {
            if (view == null || viewModel == null) return;

            view.CommandBindings.Add(
                new CommandBinding(
                    IncrementCounter,
                    (λ1, λ2) => viewModel.IncrementCounter(),
                    (λ1, λ2) =>
                        {
                            λ2.CanExecute = true;
                            λ2.Handled = true;
                        }));
            view.CommandBindings.Add(
                new CommandBinding(
                    DecrementCounter,
                    (λ1, λ2) => viewModel.DecrementCounter(),
                    (λ1, λ2) =>
                        {
                            λ2.CanExecute = true;
                            λ2.Handled = true;
                        }));
        }
    }
}

MainView.xaml (there is NO code-behind, literally deleted!)

<Window 
    x:Class="WpfApplicationCleanSeparation.MainView" 
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation" 
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml" 
    xmlns:WpfApplicationCleanSeparation="clr-namespace:WpfApplicationCleanSeparation" 
    Title="MainWindow" 
    Height="100" 
    Width="100">
    <StackPanel>
        <TextBlock Text="{Binding Counter}"></TextBlock>
        <Button Content="Decrement" Command="WpfApplicationCleanSeparation:CommandRouter.DecrementCounter"></Button>
        <Button Content="Increment" Command="WpfApplicationCleanSeparation:CommandRouter.IncrementCounter"></Button>
    </StackPanel>
</Window>

MainViewModel.cs (includes the actual Model as well since this example is so simplified, please excuse the derailing of the MVVM pattern.

using System.ComponentModel;

namespace WpfApplicationCleanSeparation.ViewModels
{
    public class CounterModel
    {
        public int Data { get; private set; }

        public void IncrementCounter()
        {
            Data++;
        }

        public void DecrementCounter()
        {
            Data--;
        }
    }

    public class MainViewModel : INotifyPropertyChanged
    {
        private CounterModel Model { get; set; }
        public event PropertyChangedEventHandler PropertyChanged = delegate { };

        public MainViewModel()
        {
            Model = new CounterModel();
        }

        public int Counter
        {
            get { return Model.Data; }
        }

        public void IncrementCounter()
        {
            Model.IncrementCounter();

            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Counter"));
        }

        public void DecrementCounter()
        {
            Model.DecrementCounter();

            PropertyChanged(this, new PropertyChangedEventArgs("Counter"));
        }
    }
}

Proof

Just a quick and dirty and I hope it's useful to someone. I saw a few different approaches through various Google's but nothing was quite as simple and easy to implement with the least amount of code possible that I wanted. If there's a way to simplify even further please let me know, thanks.

Happy Coding :)

EDIT: To simplify my own code, you might find this useful for making the Adds into one-liners.

    private static void Wire(this UIElement element, RoutedCommand command, Action action)
    {
        element.CommandBindings.Add(new CommandBinding(command, (sender, e) => action(), (sender, e) => { e.CanExecute = true; }));
    }
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λ1, λ2 is kind of cool. –  ta.speot.is Jan 13 '13 at 5:20
    
I came across the lambda character syntax somewhere here in SO and would love to give credit: it has just stuck with me. –  Dave Jellison Jan 14 '13 at 14:34
    
I have a different approach here –  Neutrino Nov 5 '13 at 17:49
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I think you are separating your Project at wrong point. I think you should share your model and business logic classes only.

VM is an adaptation of model to suit WPF Views. I would keep VM simple and do just that.

I can't imagine forcing MVVM upon Winforms. OTOH having just model & bussiness logic, you can inject those directly into a Form if needed.

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" you can't reuse a WPF MVVM in a WinForms application"

For this please see url http://waf.codeplex.com/ , i have used MVVM in Win Form, now whenver i would like to upgrade application's presentation from Win Form to WPF, it will be changed with no change in application logic,

But i have one issue with reusing ViewModel in Asp.net MVC, so i can make same Desktop win application in Web without or less change in Application logic..

Thanks...

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Sorry Dave but I didn't like your solution very much. Firstly you have to code the plumbing for each command manually in code, then you have to configure the CommandRouter to know about each view/viewmodel association in the application.

I took a different approach.

I have an Mvvm utility assembly (which has no WPF dependencies) and which I use in my viewmodel. In that assembly I declare a custom ICommand interface, and a DelegateCommand class that implements that interface.

namespace CommonUtil.Mvvm
{
    using System;


    public interface ICommand
    {
        void Execute(object parameter);
        bool CanExecute(object parameter);

        event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;
    }

    public class DelegateCommand : ICommand
    {
        public DelegateCommand(Action<object> execute) : this(execute, null)
        {

        }

        public DelegateCommand(Action<object> execute, Func<object, bool> canExecute)
        {
            _execute = execute;
            _canExecute = canExecute;
        }

        public void Execute(object parameter)
        {
            _execute(parameter);
        }

        public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
        {
            return _canExecute == null || _canExecute(parameter);
        }


        public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;

        private readonly Action<object> _execute;
        private readonly Func<object, bool> _canExecute;
    }
}

I also have a Wpf library assembly (which does reference the System WPF libraries), which I reference from my WPF UI project. In that assembly I declare a CommandWrapper class which has the standard System.Windows.Input.ICommand interface. CommandWrapper is constructed using an instance of my custom ICommand and simply delegates Execute, CanExecute and CanExecuteChanged directly to my custom ICommand type.

namespace WpfUtil
{
    using System;
    using System.Windows.Input;


    public class CommandWrapper : ICommand
    {
        // Public.

        public CommandWrapper(CommonUtil.Mvvm.ICommand source)
        {
            _source = source;
            _source.CanExecuteChanged += OnSource_CanExecuteChanged;
            CommandManager.RequerySuggested += OnCommandManager_RequerySuggested;
        }

        public void Execute(object parameter)
        {
            _source.Execute(parameter);
        }

        public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
        {
            return _source.CanExecute(parameter);
        }

        public event System.EventHandler CanExecuteChanged = delegate { };


        // Implementation.

        private void OnSource_CanExecuteChanged(object sender, EventArgs args)
        {
            CanExecuteChanged(sender, args);
        }

        private void OnCommandManager_RequerySuggested(object sender, EventArgs args)
        {
            CanExecuteChanged(sender, args);
        }

        private readonly CommonUtil.Mvvm.ICommand _source;
    }
}

In my Wpf assembly I also create a ValueConverter that when passed an instance of my custom ICommand spits out an instance of the Windows.Input.ICommand compatible CommandWrapper.

namespace WpfUtil
{
    using System;
    using System.Globalization;
    using System.Windows.Data;


    public class CommandConverter : IValueConverter
    {

        public object Convert(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            return new CommandWrapper((CommonUtil.Mvvm.ICommand)value);
        }

        public object ConvertBack(object value, Type targetType, object parameter, CultureInfo culture)
        {
            throw new System.NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
}

Now my viewmodels can expose commands as instances of my custom command type without having to have any dependency on WPF, and my UI can bind Windows.Input.ICommand commands to those viewmodels using my ValueConverter like so. (XAML namespace spam ommited).

<Window x:Class="Project1.MainWindow">

    <Window.Resources>
        <wpf:CommandConverter x:Key="_commandConv"/>
    </Window.Resources>

    <Grid>
        <Button Content="Button1" Command="{Binding CustomCommandOnViewModel,
                                        Converter={StaticResource _commandConv}}"/>
    </Grid>

</Window>

Now if I'm really lazy (which I am) and can't be bothered to have to manually apply the CommandConverter every time then in my Wpf assembly I can create my own Binding subclass like this:

namespace WpfUtil
{
    using System.Windows.Data;


    public class CommandBindingExtension : Binding
    {
        public CommandBindingExtension(string path) : base(path)
        {
            Converter = new CommandConverter();
        }
    }
}

So now I can bind to my custom command type even more simply like so:

<Window x:Class="Project1.MainWindow"
                xmlns:wpf="clr-namespace:WpfUtil;assembly=WpfUtil">

    <Window.Resources>
        <wpf:CommandConverter x:Key="_commandConv"/>
    </Window.Resources>

    <Grid>
        <Button Content="Button1" Command="{wpf:CommandBinding CustomCommandOnViewModel}"/>
    </Grid>

</Window>
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+1, Don't be sorry, I would hope someone smarter came along in 2 years, that's what SO is for ;). Just skimmed your answer but I like the added abstraction and what it brings. "I can create my own Binding subclass like this" = terribly sexy, I like it ;) –  Dave Jellison Nov 7 '13 at 4:51
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