Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
void foo()
{
    static int x = 5;
    x++;
    printf("%d", x);
}

int main()
{
    foo();
    foo();
    return 0;
}

What will be printed out? 6 6 or 6 7

And why?

share|improve this question
9  
What's the problem to try? –  Andrew Feb 17 '11 at 19:32
3  
Did you try to type this in and see for yourself? –  wilhelmtell Feb 17 '11 at 19:32
2  
I want to understand why. –  Vadiklk Feb 17 '11 at 19:33
1  
@Vadiklk so ask question starting with "Why" –  Andrey Feb 17 '11 at 19:33
1  
is this like a homework? –  vmpstr Feb 17 '11 at 19:34
show 2 more comments

12 Answers 12

up vote 21 down vote accepted

There are two issues here, lifetime and scope.

The scope of variable is where the variable name can be seen. Here, x is visible only inside function foo().

The lifetime of a variable is the period over which it exists. If x were defined without the keyword static, the lifetime would be from the entry into foo() to the return from foo(); so it would be re-initialized to 5 on every call.

The keyword static acts to extend the lifetime of a variable to the lifetime of the programme; e.g. initialization occurs once and once only and then the variable retains its value - whatever it has come to be - over all future calls to foo().

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Great answer! –  Vadiklk Feb 17 '11 at 19:35
add comment

The output is 67 since static variable is preserved after the end of the function.

Just curious, but why haven't you try it yourself?

share|improve this answer
    
I know the answer, but why wasn't x initialized to be 5 again? –  Vadiklk Feb 17 '11 at 19:34
    
Because it is a static variable. That means it will be initialized only once at the runtime. –  Fábio Perez Feb 17 '11 at 19:35
add comment

6 7

compiler arranges that static variable initialization does not happen each time the function is entered

share|improve this answer
add comment

Let's just read the Wikipedia article on Static Variables...

Static local variables: variables declared as static inside a function are statically allocated while having the same scope as automatic local variables. Hence whatever values the function puts into its static local variables during one call will still be present when the function is called again.

share|improve this answer
3  
That's terrible! "variables declared as static inside a function are statically allocated" - it explains nothing, unless you already know what it means! –  user82238 Feb 17 '11 at 19:36
    
@Blank: well, that's what I thought the second sentence was for. Though I guess you're right, it should be better worded. –  Andrew White Feb 17 '11 at 19:43
add comment

The output will be 6 7. A static variable (whether inside a function or not) is initialized exactly once, before any function in that translation unit executes. After that, it retains its value until modified.

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure the static is initialised before the function is called, and not upon first call of the function? –  Jesse Pepper Nov 29 '12 at 6:03
    
@JessePepper: At least if memory serves, this depends on whether you're talking about C++98/03 or C++11. In C++98/03, I believe it's as described above. In C++11, threading makes that essentially impossible to do, so initialization is done on first entry to the function. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 29 '12 at 7:17
1  
I think you're wrong actually. I think even pre C++11 it was only initialised when the function is called. This is important for a common solution to the static initialisation dependency problem. –  Jesse Pepper Nov 30 '12 at 7:30
add comment

You will get 6 7 printed as, as is easily tested, and here's the reason: When foo is first called, the static variable x is initialized to 5. Then it is incremented to 6 and printed.

Now for the next call to foo. The program skips the static variable initialization, and instead uses the value 6 which was assigned to x the last time around. The execution proceeds as normal, giving you the value 7.

share|improve this answer
add comment

That is the same as having the following program:

static int x = 5;

void foo()
{
    x++;
    printf("%d", x);
}

int main()
{
     foo();
     foo();
     return 0;
}

All that the static keyword does in that program is it tells the compiler (essentially) 'hey, I have a variable here that I don't want anyone else accessing, don't tell anyone else it exists'.

Inside a method, the static keyword tells the compiler the same as above, but also, 'don't tell anyone that this exists outside of this function, it should only be accessible inside this function'.

I hope this helps

share|improve this answer
1  
Well, it's not actually the same. There's still the issue of scope on X. In this example, you could poke and futz with x in main; it is global. In the original example x was local to foo, only visible while inside that block, which is generally preferable: if foo exists to maintain x in predictable and visible ways, then letting others poke it is generally dangerous. As another benefit of keeping it in scope foo() It also keeps foo() portable. –  user2149140 Jan 16 at 15:45
add comment
6 7

x is a global variable that is visible only from foo(). 5 is its initial value, as stored in the .data section of the code. Any subsequent modification overwrite previous value. There is no assignment code generated in the function body.

share|improve this answer
add comment

A static variable inside a function works like a global variable except that you can't access it outside that function.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Vadiklk,

Why ...? Reason is that static variable is initialized only once, and maintains its value throughout the program. means, you can use static variable between function calls. also it can be used to count "how many times a function is called"

main()
{
   static int var = 5;
   printf("%d ",var--);
   if(var)
      main();
} 

and answer is 5 4 3 2 1 and not 5 5 5 5 5 5 .... (infinite loop) as you are expecting. again, reason is static variable is initialized once, when next time main() is called it will not be initialize to 5 because it is already initialized in the program.So we can change the value but can not reinitialized. Thats how static variable works.

or you can consider as per storage: static variables are stored on Data Section of a program and variables which are stored in Data Section are initialized once. and before initialization they are kept in BSS section.

In turn Auto(local) variables are stored on Stack and all the variables on stack reinitialized all time when function is called as new FAR(function activation record) is created for that.

okay for more understanding, do the above example without "static" and let you know what will be the output. That make you to understand the difference between these two.

Thanks Javed

share|improve this answer
add comment

Output : 6 7 Reason : static variable is initialised only once (unlike auto variable) and further defination of static variable would be bypassed during runtime. And if it is not initialised manually, it is initialised by value 0 automatically. So,

void foo()
{
    static int x = 5; // assign value of 5 only once
    x++;
    printf("%d", x);
}

int main()
{
    foo();// x = 6
    foo();// x = 7
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

6 and 7 Because static variable intialise only once, So 5++ becomes 6 at 1st call 6++ becomes 7 at 2nd call Note-when 2nd call occurs it takes x value is 6 instead of 5 because x is static variable.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.