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I have the following xml code:

<p>
    <media id="pc300220-scpwr.gif" print-rights="no"
        rights="licensed" type="photo">
        <title>Louis Pasteur</title>
        <credit>Granger Collection</credit>
    </media>
    <b>Louis</b> 
    <pronunciation>
        <word-term>
            <b>Pasteur</b> 
        </word-term>
    </pronunciation> (1822&ndash;1895) was a French chemist. He made major contributions
    to chemistry, medicine, and industry. His work has greatly benefited people. For
    example, he discovered that diseases spread through
    <definition>
        <word-term>bacteria </word-term>
        <word-definition>tiny living things</word-definition>
    </definition>. This discovery has saved many millions of lives.
</p>

and the following XSLT segment:

<xsl:template match="p|b|i">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

will actually generate the output like

(18221895)

But I want

(1822-1895)

So could anybody help why the &ndash is not copied over to the resulting XML?

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Good question, +1. See my answer, showing that if your XML document was well-formed at all, the problem cannot be reproduced. :) –  Dimitre Novatchev Feb 17 '11 at 20:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

the following XSLT segment:

<xsl:template match="p|b|i">
    <xsl:copy>
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </xsl:copy>
</xsl:template>

will actually generate the output like

(18221895)

But I want

(1822-1895)

I cannot repro the problem.

With this XML document (corrected in order to be well-formed):

<!DOCTYPE p [
 <!ENTITY ndash   "&#8211;">
]>
<p>
    <media id="pc300220-scpwr.gif" print-rights="no"
    rights="licensed" type="photo">
        <title>Louis Pasteur</title>
        <credit>Granger Collection</credit>
    </media>
    <b>Louis</b>
    <pronunciation>
        <word-term>
            <b>Pasteur</b>
        </word-term>
    </pronunciation> (1822&ndash;1895) was a French chemist. He made major contributions         to chemistry, medicine, and industry. His work has greatly benefited people. For         example, he discovered that diseases spread through
    <definition>
        <word-term>bacteria </word-term>
        <word-definition>tiny living things</word-definition>
    </definition>. This discovery has saved many millions of lives.
</p>

and when this transformation is applied:

<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0"
 xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

    <xsl:template match="p|b|i">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

the result is:

    Louis Pasteur
    Granger Collection

<b>Louis</b>


        <b>Pasteur</b>

 (1822–1895) was a French chemist. He made major contributions         to chemistry, medicine, and industry. His work has greatly benefited people. For         example, he discovered that diseases spread through

    bacteria 
    tiny living things
. This discovery has saved many millions of lives.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Correct and well-written explanation. –  Flack Feb 17 '11 at 20:53
    
+1 Correct answer. –  user357812 Feb 17 '11 at 21:13
    
@Alejandro - you're right. I deleted my answer, in addition to being partially wrong, it woudn't compare to Dimitre's. Thx for the review. –  Alain Pannetier Feb 17 '11 at 21:22

Dimitre was correct in saying that there is no problem in the XSLT code. However, this is not an XSLT issue, this is a parsing issue.

Your document contains entity &ndash;, which is not a predefined XML entity. So a parser is not able to replace its value if it doesn't know the definition of that entity. This means that your XML is valid if it has an access to a DTD that has a definition for the entity &ndash;. That DTD might be embedded internally in the XML document (like in Dimitre's example) or it might be defined in an external DTD that is referred in the XML document. Your code didn't have any DTD definitions or references, but I believe you copy-pasted only a snippet from your code so DTD was accidentally left out.

So, what is actually causing your problem

Even if the entity definition is available, it still doesn't mean that the parser neccessarily does an entity value replacement.

XML 1.0 recommendation states: (ref: http://www.w3.org/TR/xml/#wf-entdeclared )

Note that non-validating processors are not obligated to read and process entity declarations occurring in parameter entities or in the external subset; for such documents, the rule that an entity must be declared is a well-formedness constraint only if standalone='yes'.

and: (ref: http://www.w3.org/TR/xml/#include-if-valid )

If the entity is external, and the processor is not attempting to validate the XML document, the processor MAY, but need not, include the entity's replacement text. If a non-validating processor does not include the replacement text, it MUST inform the application that it recognized, but did not read, the entity.

It's not clear is your whole document actually well-formed or not, but your parser did parse your document and it seems that it removed the entity reference without including the replacement text. Therefore 1822&ndash;1895 is interpreted as 18221895. The XSLT processor works on the parsed data model and if it doesn't contain that dash character, the XSLT processor can't copy it to the resulting XML.

I suggest that you make sure that the parser has access to the DTD where all the entities are defined and possibly also set your parser to a validating mode.

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