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I have an InputStream from which I'm reading characters. I would like multiple readers to access this InputStream. It seems that a reasonable way to achieve this is to write incoming data to a StringBuffer or StringBuilder, and have the multiple readers read that. Unfortunately, StringBufferInputStream is deprecated. StringReader reads a string, not a mutable object that's continuously being updated. What are my options? Write my own?

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1  
I think you should ask yourself why you want to do this. I have a model like this but the single reader reads the data and passes that data to where it needs to go. –  Peter Lawrey Feb 17 '11 at 20:42
    
I could do that, sure. The InputStream is from a Process. I'd like to log the output of the process to a file, and display it on a console in a GUI. I could read the output, and send the text to the log and the GUI, but it would be easier if there were a cached input stream or something. –  dgorur Feb 17 '11 at 20:46
    
@PeterLawrey: I see a scenario for this - when the different readers are independent. Example: Wrapping a console/terminal. One Reader always passes the content to be shown to the user. Another reader reacts to commands by parsing the response and eventually gives the user a different feedback based on the same input. Both readers are completely independent. –  Alik Elzin - kilaka Mar 20 '13 at 10:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Input stream work like this: once you read a portion from it, it's gone forever. You can't go back and re-read it. what you could do is something like this:

class InputStreamSplitter {
  InputStreamSplitter(InputStream toReadFrom) {
    this.reader = new InputStreamReader(toReadFrom);
  }
  void addListener(Listener l) {
    this.listeners.add(l);
  }
  void work() {
    String line = this.reader.readLine();
        while(line != null) {
      for(Listener l : this.listeners) {
        l.processLine(line);
      }
    }
  }
}

interface Listener {
  processLine(String line);
}

have all interested parties implement Listener and add them to InputStreamSplitter

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Thanks. This is in effect what I ended up doing, and ties in with Peter Lawrey's comment above. –  dgorur Feb 17 '11 at 23:20
1  
"Input stream work like this: once you read a portion from it, it's gone forever. " <--- that's not entirely true. Any InputStream implementation whose markSupported() method returns true can use mark() and reset() to effectively replay the InputStream... at least according to the contract of InputStream. –  whaley Feb 17 '11 at 23:51

To create two readers that read independently from the same source, you'll have to make sure they don't consume data from the same stream.

This can be achieved by combining TeeInputStream from Apache Commons and a PipedInputStream and PipedOutputStream as follows:

import java.io.*;
import org.apache.commons.io.input.TeeInputStream;
class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) throws IOException {

        // Create the source input stream.
        InputStream is = new FileInputStream("filename.txt");

        // Create a piped input stream for one of the readers.
        PipedInputStream in = new PipedInputStream();

        // Create a tee-splitter for the other reader.
        TeeInputStream tee = new TeeInputStream(is, new PipedOutputStream(in));

        // Create the two buffered readers.
        BufferedReader br1 = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(tee));
        BufferedReader br2 = new BufferedReader(new InputStreamReader(in));

        // Do some interleaved reads from them.
        System.out.println("One line from br1:");
        System.out.println(br1.readLine());
        System.out.println();

        System.out.println("Two lines from br2:");
        System.out.println(br2.readLine());
        System.out.println(br2.readLine());
        System.out.println();

        System.out.println("One line from br1:");
        System.out.println(br1.readLine());
        System.out.println();
    }
}

Output:

One line from br1:
Line1: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,      <-- reading from start

Two lines from br2:
Line1: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet,      <-- reading from start
Line2: consectetur adipisicing elit,

One line from br1:
Line2: consectetur adipisicing elit,    <-- resumes on line 2
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Be aware by copy pasting this code. This works not in any case. For example if the InputStream comes from ClassLoader.getSystemResourceAsStream("myResource") it will get stuck. –  Zarathustra Dec 10 '13 at 11:03

Instead of using StringWriter/StringBufferInputStream, write your original InputStream to a ByteArrayOutputStream. Once you've finished reading from the original InputStream, pass the byte array returned from ByteArrayOutputStream.toByteArray to a ByteArrayInputStream. Use this InputStream as the InputStream of choice for passing around other things that need to read from it.

Essentially, all you'd be doing here is storing the contents of the original InputStream into a byte[] cache in memory as you tried to do originally with StringWriter/StringBufferInputStream.

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Use TeeInputStream to copy all the bytes read from InputStream to secondary OutputStream, e.g. ByteArrayOutputStream.

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That's very useful, thanks. –  dgorur Feb 17 '11 at 23:20

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