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Anyone know why if I push/pop localSearchViewController, I get a EXC_BAD_ACCESS error after like 5 push/pops

if (localSearchViewController == nil)
    localSearchViewController = [[LocalSearchViewController alloc] init];

    CBAAppAppDelegate *app = (CBAAppAppDelegate *) [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];

    [app.navBarController.navigationBar setHidden:YES];

    [app.navBarController pushViewController: localSearchViewController
                                    animated:YES];
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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I don't know if this is the cause if your crash but unless you have overwritten your view controller's init method, you should be using its designated initialiser instead:

- (id)initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibName bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundle

And if you have this method defined in your implementation file, make sure you are calling super on it too.

If that doesn't solve your problem, can you try and find exactly where your code is crashing by setting breakpoints through this method AND within localSearchViewController as well. This is most likely an over release problem somewhere in your code.

[edit to add]

Here's what your code for initialising the view controller should look like:

localSearchViewController = [[LocalSearchViewController alloc] initWithNibName:@"YourNibName" bundle:nil];

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As long as he has a nib named LocalSearchView.xib or (I think) LocalSearchViewController.xib, then init should work just fine. –  Carl Veazey Feb 17 '11 at 21:22
    
From Apple docs: "The designated initializer is the method in each class that guarantees inherited instance variables are initialized (by sending a message to super to perform an inherited method). It’s also the method that does most of the work, and the one that other initialization methods in the same class invoke". So it's only fine to call init as long as it contains a call to [super] on the designated initialiser inside it. This guarantees the class is being initialised the way its meant to be as we don't know if the superclass does any other work when this method is called. –  Rog Feb 17 '11 at 21:44

Enclose that in curly braces.

if (localSearchViewController == nil) {
    localSearchViewController = [[LocalSearchViewController alloc] init];

    CBAAppAppDelegate *app = (CBAAppAppDelegate *) [[UIApplication sharedApplication] delegate];

    [app.navBarController.navigationBar setHidden:YES];

    [app.navBarController pushViewController: localSearchViewController
                                animated:YES];
}
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But then the push won't occur the second time I try to push –  DaveTheKiwi Feb 17 '11 at 21:07
    
that's unlikely to solve the problem. The check for nil is correct as is in case the intention is to create a new instance of localSearchViewController, which makes sense in the context of his code. –  Rog Feb 17 '11 at 21:13

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