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Hi i need some help to improve my code. I am trying to use Radixsort to sort array of 10 numbers (for example) in increasing order.

When i run the program with array of size 10 and put 10 random int numbers in like 70 309 450 279 799 192 586 609 54 657

i get this out:

450 309 192 279 54 192 586 657 54 609

Don´t see where my error is in the code.

class IntQueue
{

  static class Hlekkur
  {
    int tala;
    Hlekkur naest;
  }

  Hlekkur fyrsti;
  Hlekkur sidasti;
  int n;

  public IntQueue()
  {
    fyrsti = sidasti = null;
  }


  // First number in queue.
  public int first()
  {
    return fyrsti.tala;
  }


  public int get()
  {
    int res = fyrsti.tala;
    n--;
    if( fyrsti == sidasti )
      fyrsti = sidasti = null;
    else
      fyrsti = fyrsti.naest;
    return res;
  }


  public void put( int i )
  {
    Hlekkur nyr = new Hlekkur();
    n++;
    nyr.tala = i;
    if( sidasti==null )
    f yrsti = sidasti = nyr;
    else
    {
      sidasti.naest = nyr;
      sidasti = nyr;
    }
  }


  public int count()
  {
    return n;
  }

  public static void radixSort(int [] q, int n, int d){
    IntQueue [] queue = new IntQueue[n];

    for (int k = 0; k < n; k++){
      queue[k] = new IntQueue();
    }
    for (int i = d-1; i >=0; i--){
      for (int j = 0; j < n; j++){
        while(queue[j].count() != 0)
        {
          queue[j].get();
        }
      }
      for (int index = 0; index < n; index++){
        // trying to look at one of three digit to sort after.
        int v=1;
        int digit = (q[index]/v)%10;
        v*=10;

        queue[digit].put(q[index]);
      }
      for (int p = 0; p < n; p++){
        while(queue[p].count() != 0) {
          q[p] = (queue[p].get());
        }
      }
    }
  }
}

I am also thinking can I let the function take one queue as an argument and on return that queue is in increasing order? If so how?

Please help. Sorry if my english is bad not so good in it.

Please let know if you need more details.

import java.util.Random;
public class RadTest extends IntQueue {

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int [] q = new int[10];
        Random r = new Random();
        int t = 0;
        int size = 10;
        while(t != size)
        {
            q[t] = (r.nextInt(1000));
            t++;
        }

        for(int i = 0; i!= size; i++)
        {
            System.out.println(q[i]);
        }

        System.out.println("Radad: \n");
        radixSort(q,size,3);

        for(int i = 0; i!= size; i++)
        {
            System.out.println(q[i]);
        }

    }
}

Hope this is what you were talking about...


Thank you for your answer, I will look into it. Not looking for someone to solve the problem for me. Looking for help and Ideas how i can solve it.

in my task it says:

Implement a radix sort function for integers that sorts with queues. The function should take one queue as an argument and on return that queue should contain the same values in ascending order You may assume that the values are between 0 and 999.

Can i put 100 int numbers on my queue and use radixsort function to sort it or do i need to put numbers in array and then array in radixsort function which use queues?

I understand it like i needed to put numbers in Int queue and put that queue into the function but that has not worked.

But Thank for your answers will look at them and try to solve my problem. But if you think you can help please leave comment.

share|improve this question
    
It will be very, very nice to add to this source main() - how you execute your sorting –  smas Feb 17 '11 at 22:18
    
hmm you have too hard code to me, Nested for, while... It's look that you coded own implementation of queue - my suggestion is to use java Queue class, look at: javadb.com/using-a-queue-or-linkedlist. When you will use Java queue then your code will be much simplier. And I've found this: stackoverflow.com/questions/1736808/radix-sort-java maybe it will help –  smas Feb 17 '11 at 22:44

3 Answers 3

This works for the test cases I tried. It's not entirely well documented, but I think that's okay. I'll leave it to you to read it, compare it to what you're currently doing, and find out why what you have might be different than mine in philosophy. There's also other things that are marked where I did them the "lazy" way, and you should do them a better way.

import java.util.*;
class Radix {

    static int[] radixSort(int[] arr) {
        // Bucket is only used in this method, so I declare it here
        // I'm not 100% sure I recommend doing this in production code
        // but it turns out, it's perfectly legal to do!
        class Bucket {
            private List<Integer> list = new LinkedList<Integer>();
            int[] sorted;

            public void add(int i) { list.add(i);  sorted = null;}

            public int[] getSortedArray() {
                if(sorted == null) {
                    sorted = new int[list.size()];
                    int i = 0;
                    for(Integer val : list) {
                        sorted[i++] = val.intValue(); // probably could autobox, oh well
                    }
                    Arrays.sort(sorted); // use whatever method you want to sort here... 
                                         // Arrays.sort probably isn't allowed
                }
                return sorted;
            }
        }

        int maxLen = 0;
        for(int i : arr) {
            if(i < 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException("I don't deal with negative numbers");
            int len = numKeys(i);
            if(len > maxLen) maxLen = len;
        }

        Bucket[] buckets = new Bucket[maxLen];

        for(int i = 0; i < buckets.length; i++) buckets[i] = new Bucket();
        for(int i : arr) buckets[numKeys(i)-1].add(i);

        int[] result = new int[arr.length];
        int[] posarr = new int[buckets.length]; // all int to 0

        for(int i = 0; i < result.length; i++) {
            // get the 'best' element, which will be the most appropriate from
            // the set of earliest unused elements from each bucket
            int best = -1;
            int bestpos = -1;
            for(int p = 0; p < posarr.length; p++) {
                if(posarr[p] == buckets[p].getSortedArray().length) continue;
                int oldbest = best;
                best = bestOf(best, buckets[p].getSortedArray()[posarr[p]]);
                if(best != oldbest) {
                    bestpos = p;
                }


            }
            posarr[bestpos]++;
            result[i] = best;
        }

        return result;

    }

    static int bestOf(int a, int b) {
        if(a == -1) return b;
        // you'll have to write this yourself :)
        String as = a+"";
        String bs = b+"";
        if(as.compareTo(bs) < 0) return a;
        return b;
    }

    static int numKeys(int i) {
        if(i < 0) throw new IllegalArgumentException("I don't deal with negative numbers");
        if(i == 0) return 1;
        //return (i+"").length(); // lame method :}
        int len = 0;
        while(i > 0) {
            len++;
            i /= 10;
        }
        return len;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        int[] test = {1, 6, 31, 65, 143, 316, 93, 736};
        int[] res = radixSort(test);
        for(int i : res) System.out.println(i);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 just for the fact that after years of Java I just found out that you can define a class in a method. Other than that you seem to impleemnt a BucketSort not a RadixSort, which is a bit more complicated (Radix is just 3 loops after all [at least if you keep it simple and allow only positive numbers]) –  Voo Feb 17 '11 at 23:46
    
Radix sort is often implemented as a modified version of bucket sort. The difference is what do you do to merge after you get them from the buckets? I.e. what is the bestOf(int,int) method? In traditional bucket sort, it would be return min(a,b). Instead, we use the radix to do it. Essentially, bucket sort can be thought of as a special case of radix sort where radix = 2. –  corsiKa Feb 17 '11 at 23:48
    
Why would you want to implement the simpler, less efficient algorithm using the more complex, efficient sort? RadixSort is a extremely easy algorithm that only needs loops and bitmasking - BucketSort is a good bit more complicated don't you agree? Also a bucket sort with radix=2 is more of an inefficient QuickSort isn't it? A MSB radix sort could be considered a bucket sort if you limit yourself to powers of 2 I think. –  Voo Feb 17 '11 at 23:59
    
I find that code to complicated. The solution im supposed to write cant be that extreme, Im only in my second computer science course so it should be little bit easier and not so much code i think? :S –  endif Feb 18 '11 at 0:02
    
I really don't see bucketsort being more difficult (or even different) than radixsort. They're both applying the same basic concepts, and the difficult part is in the merge. Where's the big difference? –  corsiKa Feb 18 '11 at 0:06

One thing that looks strange:

  for (int p = 0; p < n; p++){
    while(queue[p].count() != 0) {
      q[p] = (queue[p].get());
    }
  }

Is p supposed to be the index in q, which ranges from 0 to n-1, or in queue, which ranges from 0 to 9? It is unlikely to be both ...

Another:

  for (int index = 0; index < n; index++){
    // trying to look at one of three digit to sort after.
    int v=1;
    int digit = (q[index]/v)%10;
    v*=10;

    queue[digit].put(q[index]);
  }

Why are you multiplying v by 10, only to overwrite it by v = 1 in the next iteration? Are you aware than v will always be one, and you will thus look at the same digit in every iteration?

share|improve this answer

Well I don't think I can help without almost posting the solution (just giving hints is more exhausting and I'm a bit tired, sorry), so I'll just contribute a nice little fuzz test so you can test your solution. How does that sound? :-)

Coming up with a good fuzztester is always a good idea if you're implementing some algorithm. While there's no 100% certainty if that runs with your implementation chances are it'll work (radix sort doesn't have any strange edge cases I'm aware of that only happen extremely rarely)

private static void fuzztest() throws Exception{
    Random rnd = new Random();
    int testcnt = 0;
    final int NR_TESTS = 10000;
    // Maximum size of array.
    final int MAX_DATA_LENGTH = 1000;
    // Maximum value allowed for each integer. 
    final int MAX_SIZE = Integer.MAX_VALUE; 

    while(testcnt < NR_TESTS){
     int len = rnd.nextInt(MAX_DATA_LENGTH) + 1;
     Integer[] array = new Integer[len];
     Integer[] radix = new Integer[len];

     for(int i = 0; i < len; i++){
      array[i] = rnd.nextInt(MAX_SIZE);
      radix[i] = new Integer(array[i]);
     }

     Arrays.sort(array);
     sort(radix);  // use your own sort function here.

     for(int i = 0; i < len; i++){
      if(array[i].compareTo(radix[i]) != 0){
       throw new Exception("Not sorted!");
      }
     }
     System.out.println(testcnt);
     testcnt++;
    }        
share|improve this answer

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