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I've started learning C and am a bit confused when it comes to arrays.

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i;
    char j[5];

    for (i = 0; i < 5; i++)
    {
        j[i] = 'a';
    }

    printf("%s\n", j);
}

Running this code prints out

aaaaa♣

I've read that the char array needs to be one byte longer than the string so the compiler can place the \0 at the end. If I replace the code with this:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i;
    char j[5];

    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        j[i] = 'a';
    }

    printf("%s\n", j);
}

The output I get is:

aaaaa

The char array is one byte longer than I'm using. I suspect this is why I don't see that odd character at the end of the string?

I tried to test this theory with the following code:

#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int i;
    char j[5];

    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        j[i] = 'a';
    }

    for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
       printf("%d\n", j[i]);
    }
}

But, in the output, I see no nullbyte. Is this because it will only be added when outputed as a string?

97
97
97
97
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6 Answers 6

It's your job to add the null byte. The compiler won't necessarily do it for you. Local variables are generally left uninitialized at runtime.

int i;
char j[5];    /* five uninitialized characters, could be anything */

for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
{
    j[i] = 'a';
}

j[4] = '\0';  /* explicitly add null terminator */

Notice that if you use a string initializer rather than manually setting each character then the compiler will handle adding the null terminator for you:

char j[5] = "aaaa";  /* initialize to {'a', 'a', 'a', 'a', '\0'} */
share|improve this answer
    
Adding the nullbyte fixed up the output. Didn't realise I had to manually add that. Cheers. One more question: If I change the for loop to i <= 6 a 'b' gets appended to the output. This is obviously overfilling my j array and thus creating unexecpted output... But why a 'b'? Can you link me to some good reading material on C arrays? –  dave Feb 18 '11 at 0:51
    
Also include char j[5] = {0}; in the answer? –  user166390 Feb 18 '11 at 1:18

In both of these cases you print an array of char without 0-termination using a function that expects 0-termination.

Append a '\0' to each string (excluding the one with 5 chars)

for (i = 0; i < 4; i++)
    {
        j[i] = 'a';
    }
j[4] = '\0';

Also, your array is 5 chars/bytes long, not 6. You can store 4 chars + 0-termination in it, not 5 chars + 0-termination.

For the %d loop, you print each 'a' as an integer. The "%d\n" string you pass to printf is automatically 0-terminated, so the output is 97\n

share|improve this answer

The char array is one byte longer than I'm using. I suspect this is why I don't see that odd character at the end of the string?

Not really, if you added only 4 elements, the 5th one is there by coincidence. For the 5th character you should have done this j[4] = '\0';, in this case there might have been a \0 value on the next memory address.

But, in the output, I see no nullbyte

That is because you are only printing the first 4 characters (see your loop).

share|improve this answer

You need to put the null character in yourself when constructing strings like that.

The only time you don't is when you set a string literal...

char *str = "this is a string";

The compiler will pop the \0 at the end for you.

CodePad.org

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There is no null byte because you only printed the first four bytes. The null is in the fifth. Also, unless you use a string generated by the compiler (such as "string"), the null byte needs to be set manually. The only reason your code is working now is that the memory where the string is placed just happens to be 0 already. As for requiring the null byte, c strings use it to indicate the end of the string. It will not always be used for arrays, but needs to be there whenever the array is interpretted as a string.

share|improve this answer

I'm a big fan of array initialiser lists, and this is one example in particular where these can* be used.

As you're aware, your string is simply an array of characters. As such, you can use an array initialiser list with a single initialiser value to explicitly set every one of the characters in the string to NUL:

char j[5] = {'\0'};

This initialises each element of j to '\0'. Then, as you demonstrated in your original code, you can set each character and be sure that there's a NUL at the end of the string (unless of course you set every element to a character other than NUL).

* Just to be clear - I think the solutions char* j = "aaaa"; and char j[5]; j[4] = '\0' are preferable in this case, since they avoid setting characters to NUL that you're going to overwrite later. this is particularly the case with even longer strings. However, I thought I'd still introduce the technique since this can be quite useful for arrays of other kinds (such as, for example, if you had a need to initialise an array of floats to pi: float j[5] = {3.14159};).

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