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I'm using OpenGL with C#, using CSGL12 interface for our project. I'm attempting to draw a number of 4-point free-transformed images onto a bitmap in memory.

Is there a way to either:

  1. Directly render to a bitmap on memory, or,
  2. Render to an off-screen instance, and then convert this to a bitmap? I need to know how to setup an off-screen instance as well as the conversion.

Either method must work on a Remote Desktop, a Virtual Machine, and on a Panasonic CF-19 Toughbook (i.e. OpenGL v1.1). If possible, providing an example code related to it will help tremendously.

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I tried searching for the Frame Buffer method, but the examples didn't seem to work on a Remote Desktop. I'm trying to look into PBuffer right now, but I can't seem to find a good example code for this. –  Japtar Feb 18 '11 at 0:59
    
Thanks to datenwolf for the PBuffer code. Unfortunately, it doesn't look like it's working through Remote Desktop. A different method has to be sought. –  Japtar Feb 18 '11 at 21:28
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You know, OpenGL-1.1 is really outdated nowadays. Even the crappiest GPUs on the market can do OpenGL-1.4 now. One thing you should know first is, that OpenGL has been designed for getting pictures on the screen, although the nature of the output backend is keept abstract in the specification. If you want to use OpenGL to render 3D stuff accelerated, then don't render to bitmaps. This will always fall you back into software rasterization mode, which is extremely slow So use a PBuffer or a Framebuffer Object. Framebuffer Objects are straigtforward to use. But PBuffers are a little bit tricky.

In Windows you always need to take a detour over creating a dummy window with some OpenGL context first, so that you can request and use OpenGL extensions. Using X11/GLX one can create a PBuffer without that dummy window. However the usual use for a PBuffer used to be a place where contents for dynamic textures were created.

The following is some code I wrote ages ago, and it silently assumes an existing, validly initialized OpenGL context to be active on the current thread, and will configure the PBuffer context to share its OpenGL objects with the original context. Also it depends on the library GLEW.

pbuffer.h

#ifndef PBUFFER_H
#define PBUFFER_H

#ifdef WIN32
#include <GL/wglew.h>
#endif

#ifdef GLX
#ifdef NOGLEW
#include <GL/glx.h>
#else
#include <GL/glxew.h>
#endif
#endif

class PBuffer
{
public:
    PBuffer(int width, int height);
    virtual ~PBuffer();

    void Use();
    void Release();

    int const get_width() const { return width; }
    int const get_height() const { return height; }

private:
    void Create();
    void Destroy();

protected:
    int width;
    int height;

    bool initialized;

#ifdef WIN32
    HPBUFFERARB hPB;
    HGLRC       hPBRC;
    HDC     hPBDC;

    HDC     hGLDC;
    HGLRC       hGLRC;
#endif

#ifdef GLX
    Display     *dpy;
    int     scrnum;
    GLXContext  PBRC;
    GLXPbuffer  PBDC;

    GLXContext  FBRC;
    GLXDrawable FBDC;
#endif
};

#endif/*PBUFFER_H*/

pbuffer.cpp

#include <stdexcept>
#include <GL/glew.h>
#include "pbuffer.h"

using namespace std;

#ifdef WIN32

PBuffer::PBuffer(int width, int height)
{
    initialized=false;

    this->width=width;
    this->height=height;

    hGLDC = wglGetCurrentDC();
    hGLRC = wglGetCurrentContext();

    Create();
}

PBuffer::~PBuffer()
{
    Destroy();
}

void PBuffer::Use()
{
    // make sure the pbuffer has been initialized
    if (!initialized)
    {
        throw runtime_error("pbuffer is not initialized");
    }
    // make sure we haven't lost our pbuffer due to a display mode change

    int flag = 0;
    wglQueryPbufferARB(hPB, WGL_PBUFFER_LOST_ARB, &flag);
    if (flag)
    {
        throw runtime_error("pbuffer became invalid");
    }

    wglMakeCurrent(hPBDC, hPBRC);

    glViewport(0, 0, width, height);

    glDrawBuffer(GL_FRONT);
        glReadBuffer(GL_FRONT);
}

void PBuffer::Release()
{
    // make sure the pbuffer has been initialized
    if ( !initialized )
    {
        throw runtime_error("pbuffer is not initialized");
    }
    // make sure we haven't lost our pbuffer due to a display mode change
    int flag = 0;
    wglQueryPbufferARB(hPB, WGL_PBUFFER_LOST_ARB, &flag);
    if (flag)
    {
        throw runtime_error("pbuffer became invalid");
    }

    wglMakeCurrent(hGLDC, hGLRC);
}

void PBuffer::Create()
{
    if(initialized)
    {
        Destroy();
    }

    if (hGLDC == NULL)
    {
        throw runtime_error("unable to get device context");
    }
    if (hGLRC == NULL)
    {
        throw runtime_error("unable to get render context");
    }
    // define the minimum pixel format requirements we will need for our pbuffer
    // a pbuffer is just like a frame buffer, it can have a depth buffer associated
    // with it and it can be double buffered.
    int attr[] =
    {
        WGL_SUPPORT_OPENGL_ARB, TRUE, // pbuffer will be used with gl
        WGL_DRAW_TO_PBUFFER_ARB, TRUE, // enable render to pbuffer
        WGL_RED_BITS_ARB, 16, // at least 8 bits for RED channel
        WGL_GREEN_BITS_ARB, 16, // at least 8 bits for GREEN channel
        WGL_BLUE_BITS_ARB, 16, // at least 8 bits for BLUE channel
        WGL_ALPHA_BITS_ARB, 16, // at least 8 bits for ALPHA channel
        WGL_DEPTH_BITS_ARB, 24, // at least 24 bits for depth buffer
        WGL_DOUBLE_BUFFER_ARB, FALSE, // we dont require double buffering
        0 // zero terminates the list
    };

    // choose a pixel format that meets our minimum requirements
    unsigned int count = 0;
    int pixelFormat;
    wglChoosePixelFormatARB(hGLDC,(const int*)attr, NULL, 1,&pixelFormat,&count);
    if(count == 0)
    {
        throw runtime_error("no matching pbuffer pixel format found");
    }

    int attribs[]={0,0};

    // allocate the pbuffer
    hPB = wglCreatePbufferARB(hGLDC, pixelFormat, width, height, attribs);
    hPBDC = wglGetPbufferDCARB(hPB);
    hPBRC = wglCreateContext(hPBDC);

    wglShareLists(hGLRC, hPBRC);

    initialized=true;
}

void PBuffer::Destroy()
{
    // make sure the pbuffer has been initialized
    if ( !initialized )
    {
        throw runtime_error("pbuffer is not initialized");
    }

    Release();

    wglDeleteContext(hPBRC);
    wglReleasePbufferDCARB(hPB, hPBDC);
    wglDestroyPbufferARB(hPB);

    initialized = false;
}
#endif

#ifdef GLX
PBuffer::PBuffer(int width, int height)
{
    initialized=false;

    this->width=width;
        this->height=height;

    dpy = glXGetCurrentDisplay();
    scrnum = DefaultScreen( dpy );
    FBRC = glXGetCurrentContext();
    FBDC = glXGetCurrentDrawable();

    Create();
}

PBuffer::~PBuffer()
{
    Destroy();
}

void PBuffer::Use()
{
    // make sure the pbuffer has been initialized
    if (!initialized)
    {
        throw runtime_error("pbuffer is not initialized");
    }
    // make sure we haven't lost our pbuffer due to a display mode change

    // resize view port. generally you'll want to set this to the
    // size of your pbuffer so that you render to the entire pbuffer
    // but there are cases where you might want to render to just a
    // sub-region of the pbuffer.
    glXMakeContextCurrent(dpy, PBDC, PBDC, PBRC);

    glViewport(0, 0, width, height);

    glDrawBuffer(GL_FRONT);
    glReadBuffer(GL_FRONT);
}

void PBuffer::Release()
{
    // make sure the pbuffer has been initialized
    if ( !initialized )
    {
        throw runtime_error("pbuffer is not initialized");
    }
    // make sure we haven't lost our pbuffer due to a display mode change

    glXMakeContextCurrent(dpy, FBDC, FBDC, FBRC);
}

void PBuffer::Create()
{
    if(initialized)
    {
        Destroy();
    }

    if (dpy == NULL)
    {
        throw runtime_error("unable to get device context");
    }
    if (!FBDC)
    {
        throw runtime_error("unable to get render context");
    }
    // define the minimum pixel format requirements we will need for our pbuffer
    // a pbuffer is just like a frame buffer, it can have a depth buffer associated
    // with it and it can be double buffered.
    /*int attr[] =
    {
        GLX_RENDER_TYPE, GLX_RGBA_BIT,
        GLX_DRAWABLE_TYPE, GLX_PBUFFER_BIT | GLX_WINDOW_BIT,
        GLX_DOUBLEBUFFER, False,
        GLX_RED_SIZE, 1,
        GLX_GREEN_SIZE, 1,
        GLX_BLUE_SIZE, 1,
        GLX_ALPHA_SIZE, 1,
        GLX_DEPTH_SIZE, 1,
        0 // zero terminates the list
    };*/

    int attrib[] =
    {
        GLX_DOUBLEBUFFER,  False,
        GLX_RED_SIZE,      8,
        GLX_GREEN_SIZE,    8,
        GLX_BLUE_SIZE,     8,
        GLX_ALPHA_SIZE,    8,
        GLX_STENCIL_SIZE,  1,
        GLX_DEPTH_SIZE,    24,
        GLX_RENDER_TYPE,   GLX_RGBA_BIT,
        GLX_DRAWABLE_TYPE, GLX_PBUFFER_BIT | GLX_WINDOW_BIT,
        None
    };

    int PBattrib[] =
    {
        GLX_PBUFFER_WIDTH,   width,
        GLX_PBUFFER_HEIGHT,  height,
        GLX_LARGEST_PBUFFER, False,
    None
    };

    // choose a pixel format that meets our minimum requirements
    int count = 0;
    //GLXFBConfigSGIX *config=
    //  glXChooseFBConfigSGIX(dpy, scrnum, attrib, &count);

    GLXFBConfig *config=
        glXChooseFBConfig(dpy, scrnum, attrib, &count);

    if(config == NULL || count == 0)
    {
        throw runtime_error("no matching pbuffer pixel format found");
    }

    // allocate the pbuffer
    //PBDC=glXCreateGLXPbufferSGIX(dpy, config[0], width, height, PBattrib);
    //PBRC=glXCreateContextWithConfigSGIX(dpy, config[0], GLX_RGBA_TYPE_SGIX, FBRC, true);

    PBDC=glXCreatePbuffer(dpy, config[0], PBattrib);
    PBRC=glXCreateNewContext(dpy, config[0], GLX_RGBA_TYPE, FBRC, true);

    XFree(config);

    initialized=true;
}

void PBuffer::Destroy()
{
    // make sure the pbuffer has been initialized
    if ( !initialized )
    {
        throw runtime_error("pbuffer is not initialized");
    }

    Release();

    glXDestroyContext(dpy, PBRC);
    glXDestroyPbuffer(dpy, PBDC);

    initialized = false;
}

#endif
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In a VM, you don't have much choice besides software rasterization. But letting OpenGL render as efficiently as possible and creating a bitmap out of the result is definitely a better idea than rendering into a (host) memory DC. –  Ben Voigt Feb 18 '11 at 18:46
    
You could use VirtualGL to provide the VM with access to an actual GPU. –  datenwolf Feb 18 '11 at 20:00
    
What about Remote Desktop? –  Japtar Feb 18 '11 at 20:16
    
By the way, thanks for the code. I certainly got it working through a few computers, but Remote Desktop didn't seem to work. Function wglCreatePbufferARB() didn't exist through Remote Desktop, though running the same desktop on a monitor directly connected to it worked fine. –  Japtar Feb 18 '11 at 21:25
    
PBuffer is an extension and not supported by the Windows OpenGL software rasterizer. But you could use MesaGL which also offers a pure software rasterizer, directly into a pixmap. Also MesaGL's software rasterizer is a good deal faster than Windows's software implementation. –  datenwolf Feb 19 '11 at 0:46
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You can pull from a buffer (opengl calls off-screen buffers "aux") into a bitmap using Bitmap.LockBits and glCopyPixels.

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