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I have a TSQL script that is used to set up a database as part of my product's installation. It takes a number of steps which all together take five minutes or so. Sometimes this script fails on the last step because the user running the script does not have sufficient rights to the database. In this case I would like the script to fail strait away. To do this I want the script to test what rights it has up front. Can anyone point me at a general purpose way of testing if the script is running with a particular security permission?

Edit: In the particular case I am looking at it is trying to do a backup, but I have had other things go wrong and was hoping for a general purpose solution.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
select * from fn_my_permissions(NULL, 'SERVER') 

This gives you a list of permissions the current session has on the server

select * from fn_my_permissions(NULL, 'DATABASE')

This gives you a list of permissions for the current session on the current database.

See here for more information.

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Thanks a lot, I see from the MSDN post that what I actually want is IF HAS_PERMS_BY_NAME(db_name(), 'DATABASE', 'BACKUP DATABASE') <> 1 but this post pointed me there. –  Martin Brown Feb 2 '09 at 16:53

try the last insert/update up front with some where condition like

insert/update
where 1=2

if (@@error <> 0)
   raise error 6666 'no permissions'

this would not cause any harm but would raise a flag upfront about the lack of rights.

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I assume it is failing on an update or insert after a long series of selects.

Just try a simple update or insert inside a transaction. Hard-code the row id, or whatever to make it simple and fast.

Don't commit the transaction--instead roll it back.

If you don't have rights to do the insert or update, this should fail. If you DO, it will roll back and not cause a permanent change.

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In the particular case I am looking at it is trying to do a backup, but I have had other things go wrong and was hoping for a general purpose solution. –  Martin Brown Feb 2 '09 at 16:07
    
Ah.... Hmm. That'd be a little trickier, then. –  BradC Feb 2 '09 at 16:17

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