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I guessed it but was still surprised to see that the output of these two programs, written in C and C++, when compiled were very different. That makes me think that the concept of objects still exist at even the lowest level. Does this add overhead? If so is it currently an impossible optimization to convert object oriented code to procedural style or just very hard to do?

helloworld.c

#include <stdio.h>

int main(void) {
    printf("Hello World!\n");
    return 0;
}

helloworld.cpp

#include <iostream>

int main() {
  std::cout << "Hello World!" << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

Compiled like this:

gcc helloworld.cpp -o hwcpp.S -S -O2
gcc helloworld.c -o hwc.S -S -O2

Produced this code:

C assembly

    .file   "helloworld.c"
    .section    .rodata.str1.1,"aMS",@progbits,1
.LC0:
    .string "Hello World!\n"
    .text
    .p2align 4,,15
.globl main
    .type   main, @function
main:
    pushl   %ebp
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    andl    $-16, %esp
    subl    $16, %esp
    movl    $.LC0, 4(%esp)
    movl    $1, (%esp)
    call    __printf_chk
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    leave
    ret
    .size   main, .-main
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5) 4.4.3"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits

C++ assembly

    .file   "helloworld.cpp"
    .text
    .p2align 4,,15
    .type   _GLOBAL__I_main, @function
_GLOBAL__I_main:
.LFB1007:
    .cfi_startproc
    .cfi_personality 0x0,__gxx_personality_v0
    pushl   %ebp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    .cfi_offset 5, -8
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 5
    subl    $24, %esp
    movl    $_ZStL8__ioinit, (%esp)
    call    _ZNSt8ios_base4InitC1Ev
    movl    $__dso_handle, 8(%esp)
    movl    $_ZStL8__ioinit, 4(%esp)
    movl    $_ZNSt8ios_base4InitD1Ev, (%esp)
    call    __cxa_atexit
    leave
    ret
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE1007:
    .size   _GLOBAL__I_main, .-_GLOBAL__I_main
    .section    .ctors,"aw",@progbits
    .align 4
    .long   _GLOBAL__I_main
    .section    .rodata.str1.1,"aMS",@progbits,1
.LC0:
    .string "Hello World!"
    .text
    .p2align 4,,15
.globl main
    .type   main, @function
main:
.LFB997:
    .cfi_startproc
    .cfi_personality 0x0,__gxx_personality_v0
    pushl   %ebp
    .cfi_def_cfa_offset 8
    movl    %esp, %ebp
    .cfi_offset 5, -8
    .cfi_def_cfa_register 5
    andl    $-16, %esp
    pushl   %ebx
    subl    $28, %esp
    movl    $12, 8(%esp)
    movl    $.LC0, 4(%esp)
    movl    $_ZSt4cout, (%esp)
    .cfi_escape 0x10,0x3,0x7,0x55,0x9,0xf0,0x1a,0x9,0xfc,0x22
    call    _ZSt16__ostream_insertIcSt11char_traitsIcEERSt13basic_ostreamIT_T0_ES6_PKS3_i
    movl    _ZSt4cout, %eax
    movl    -12(%eax), %eax
    movl    _ZSt4cout+124(%eax), %ebx
    testl   %ebx, %ebx
    je  .L9
    cmpb    $0, 28(%ebx)
    je  .L5
    movzbl  39(%ebx), %eax
.L6:
    movsbl  %al,%eax
    movl    %eax, 4(%esp)
    movl    $_ZSt4cout, (%esp)
    call    _ZNSo3putEc
    movl    %eax, (%esp)
    call    _ZNSo5flushEv
    addl    $28, %esp
    xorl    %eax, %eax
    popl    %ebx
    movl    %ebp, %esp
    popl    %ebp
    ret
    .p2align 4,,7
    .p2align 3
.L5:
    movl    %ebx, (%esp)
    call    _ZNKSt5ctypeIcE13_M_widen_initEv
    movl    (%ebx), %eax
    movl    $10, 4(%esp)
    movl    %ebx, (%esp)
    call    *24(%eax)
    jmp .L6
.L9:
    call    _ZSt16__throw_bad_castv
    .cfi_endproc
.LFE997:
    .size   main, .-main
    .local  _ZStL8__ioinit
    .comm   _ZStL8__ioinit,1,1
    .weakref    _ZL20__gthrw_pthread_oncePiPFvvE,pthread_once
    .weakref    _ZL27__gthrw_pthread_getspecificj,pthread_getspecific
    .weakref    _ZL27__gthrw_pthread_setspecificjPKv,pthread_setspecific
    .weakref    _ZL22__gthrw_pthread_createPmPK14pthread_attr_tPFPvS3_ES3_,pthread_create
    .weakref    _ZL20__gthrw_pthread_joinmPPv,pthread_join
    .weakref    _ZL21__gthrw_pthread_equalmm,pthread_equal
    .weakref    _ZL20__gthrw_pthread_selfv,pthread_self
    .weakref    _ZL22__gthrw_pthread_detachm,pthread_detach
    .weakref    _ZL22__gthrw_pthread_cancelm,pthread_cancel
    .weakref    _ZL19__gthrw_sched_yieldv,sched_yield
    .weakref    _ZL26__gthrw_pthread_mutex_lockP15pthread_mutex_t,pthread_mutex_lock
    .weakref    _ZL29__gthrw_pthread_mutex_trylockP15pthread_mutex_t,pthread_mutex_trylock
    .weakref    _ZL31__gthrw_pthread_mutex_timedlockP15pthread_mutex_tPK8timespec,pthread_mutex_timedlock
    .weakref    _ZL28__gthrw_pthread_mutex_unlockP15pthread_mutex_t,pthread_mutex_unlock
    .weakref    _ZL26__gthrw_pthread_mutex_initP15pthread_mutex_tPK19pthread_mutexattr_t,pthread_mutex_init
    .weakref    _ZL29__gthrw_pthread_mutex_destroyP15pthread_mutex_t,pthread_mutex_destroy
    .weakref    _ZL30__gthrw_pthread_cond_broadcastP14pthread_cond_t,pthread_cond_broadcast
    .weakref    _ZL27__gthrw_pthread_cond_signalP14pthread_cond_t,pthread_cond_signal
    .weakref    _ZL25__gthrw_pthread_cond_waitP14pthread_cond_tP15pthread_mutex_t,pthread_cond_wait
    .weakref    _ZL30__gthrw_pthread_cond_timedwaitP14pthread_cond_tP15pthread_mutex_tPK8timespec,pthread_cond_timedwait
    .weakref    _ZL28__gthrw_pthread_cond_destroyP14pthread_cond_t,pthread_cond_destroy
    .weakref    _ZL26__gthrw_pthread_key_createPjPFvPvE,pthread_key_create
    .weakref    _ZL26__gthrw_pthread_key_deletej,pthread_key_delete
    .weakref    _ZL30__gthrw_pthread_mutexattr_initP19pthread_mutexattr_t,pthread_mutexattr_init
    .weakref    _ZL33__gthrw_pthread_mutexattr_settypeP19pthread_mutexattr_ti,pthread_mutexattr_settype
    .weakref    _ZL33__gthrw_pthread_mutexattr_destroyP19pthread_mutexattr_t,pthread_mutexattr_destroy
    .ident  "GCC: (Ubuntu 4.4.3-4ubuntu5) 4.4.3"
    .section    .note.GNU-stack,"",@progbits
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4  
these are two different programs, the only thing they have in common is the final output on the screen. of course they have to compile differently. –  Javier Feb 18 '11 at 2:39
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5 Answers

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Different compilers produce different code. An early version of gcc versus the current version of gcc likely produce different code.

More importantly, iostream handles a lot of things stdio doesn't, so there's obviously going to be some substantial overhead. I understand that, in theory, these could be compiled down to indentical code, but what they're doing is not technically identical.

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Your issue here isn't about objects or optimization: it's that printf and cout are fundamentally very different beasts. For a more fair comparison, replace your cout statement in the C++ code with printf. Optimization is a moot point when you're outputting to stdout, as the bottleneck will certainly be the terminal's buffer.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for spotting the difference, but please note that stdout doesn't mean a terminal, and the overhead of cout often does negatively impact throughput when redirected to a disk file. –  Ben Voigt Feb 18 '11 at 2:24
    
@Ben: or to /dev/null... :-) –  Tony D Feb 18 '11 at 2:27
    
@Tony: True, but when redirecting to /dev/null, the function to beat isn't printf, but one that recognizes /dev/null and skips the formatting altogether. –  Ben Voigt Feb 18 '11 at 2:30
1  
@Ben Voigt: the point isn't about overhead, efficiency or anything. it's that the original programs are two different programs that do different things, they have to be compiled differently. if the same program was fed to both compilers the code would be more similar. –  Javier Feb 18 '11 at 2:37
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You're not calling the same functions in the C++ example as the C example. Replace the std::cout pipes with plain old printf just like the C code and you should see a much greater correlation between the output of the two compilers.

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You have to realize that there are a whole lot of "other" things going on in C++. Global constructors for example. Also the libraries are different.

the C++ stream object is far more complicated than C io, and if you look through the assembler you can see all the code for pthreads in the C++ version.

It's not necessarily slower but it's certainly different.

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I guessed it but was still surprised to see that the output of these two programs, written in C and C++, when compiled were very different.

I'm surprised you were surprised - they're totally different programs.

That makes me think that the concept of objects still exist at even the lowest level.

Absolutely... objects are the way memory is laid out and used during program execution (subject to optimisations).

Does this add overhead?

Not necessarily or typically - the same data would have to be somewhere anyway if the work was being coordinated in the same logical way.

If so is it currently an impossible optimization to convert object oriented code to procedural style or just very hard to do?

The issue has nothing to do with OO vs procedural code, or one being more efficient than the other. The main issue you observe here is that C++'s ostreams require a bit more setup and tear-down, and have more of the I/O coordinated by inline code, while printf() has more out-of-line in the precompiled library so you can't see it in your little code listing. It's not clear really which is "better", and unless you have a performance problem that profiling shows is related you should forget about it and get some useful programming done.

EDIT in response to comment:

Fair call - was a bit harshly worded - sorry. It's a difficult distinction to make actually... "only the compiler [knows] of objects" is true in one sense - they're not encapsulated, half-holy discrete "things" to the compiler the way they can be to the programmer. And, we could write an object that could be used exactly like you have used cout that would disappear during compilation and produce code that was equivalent to the printf() version. But, cout and iostreams involves some setup because it's thread safe and more inlined and handles different locales, and it's a real object with storage requirements because it carries around more independent information about error state, whether you want exceptions thrown, end-of-file conditions (printf() affects "errno", which is then clobbered by the next library/OS call)....

What you might find more insightful is to compare how much extra code is generated when you print one more string, as the amount of code is basically some constant overhead + some per-usage amount, and in latter regard ostream-based code can be as or more efficient than printf(), depending on the types and formatting requested. It's also worth noting that...

std::cout << "Hello world!\n";

...is correct and more analogous to your printf() statement... std::endl explicitly requests an unnecessary flushing operation, as a Standard-compliant C++ program will flush and close its buffers as the stream goes out of scope anyway (that said, there's an interesting post today where it seems someone's Microsoft VisualC++ compiler's not doing that for them! - worth keeping an eye on but hard to believe).

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1  
Why were you surprised? I don't claim to be an expert. The software industry is harsh... I was surprised because I figured under the hood cout was just taking a string and and outputting it to the console like the printf was with some differences, I didn't think an actual object had to be created, I thought only the compiler knew of objects. –  ArturPhilibin Feb 18 '11 at 2:39
    
@DaSilva_Ireland: response in EDIT above... –  Tony D Feb 18 '11 at 3:13
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